Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

dgul

Seeing the receptionist/doctor

Recommended Posts

So it turns out many people with serious conditions are dissuaded from seeing the doctor because the receptionist needs to ask about their medical condition.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-37605573

Apparently we need to be 'forceful' with the receptionist...

IMO this has gone the same way that everything else government touches goes.  They manage demand down by making the experience sufficiently unpleasant that it dissuades people from using the service, while those who know the tricks use up all of the provision (then making it worse for those who need to use the service...).

In this case they could probably solve 95% of the problem by merely asking the patient's name and entering it into their database -- if the person hasn't seen a doctor in ages then they might as well just give them an early appointment with no more questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you need a receptionist for?

Can that not be automated?

It can. But our practice refused to let more than 5% of appointments be allocated online, and I think has actually stopped it now. There's also an automated booking system you can opt for.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some receptionists must beleive they are doctors, or even run/own the practice.

and some are right rude and millitant. 

After a long phone call to book an appointment, one receptionist said "i will allow you to see a doctor today"  thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, SarahBell said:

What do you need a receptionist for?

Can that not be automated?

It can. But our practice refused to let more than 5% of appointments be allocated online, and I think has actually stopped it now. There's also an automated booking system you can opt for.

 

 

Likewise, the automated/online systems have been shut down here since there aren't any appointments. The available appointments appear to be given to the lucky ones who managed to get through by phone when the practice opened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gave up with the NHS. This link is only going to be useful for people who live near Winchester.

£49 per month for 6 appointments per year with various other things included.

http://thewalcotepractice.co.uk/

Same-day or next-day appointment. The doctor is extremely good.

I can't work out why we don't have several of these in every city. It took me ages to find that one and at twenty miles from here it's the nearest functional GP practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, SarahBell said:

What do you need a receptionist for?

Can that not be automated?

It can. But our practice refused to let more than 5% of appointments be allocated online, and I think has actually stopped it now. There's also an automated booking system you can opt for.

 

 

Public sector make-work scheme.

The fact that they then cause crap service is neither here or there - for the public.

Just a means where by reso8rces are made to feel short when they are not.

GPs un towns and regions shuld be forced to pool appointments. You go online to selec and appointment. Then let the money follow the patients. The cr.p abou a GP knowing there patient is BS for 95% of the cases. Even then, its just a cosy agreemnt of providng sick notes to the select few - normally ther receptionists family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, SarahBell said:

'Can I speak to Richard?' after being told there were no appointments immediately got me one. 
Richard being the practice manager. 

Thanks, that's a useful tip,

Are they always called Richard?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, DTMark said:

I gave up with the NHS. This link is only going to be useful for people who live near Winchester.

£49 per month for 6 appointments per year with various other things included.

http://thewalcotepractice.co.uk/

Same-day or next-day appointment. The doctor is extremely good.

I can't work out why we don't have several of these in every city. It took me ages to find that one and at twenty miles from here it's the nearest functional GP practice.

Very interesting indeed. I now have a 3 week wait to see a GP. 3 weeks to spend 10 minutes talking to someone.

I can see businesses like this taking off big time all over the UK if they can stay at this price point. Does the price start to ramp up big-time once you have to order blood tests and the like?

Good to see you back by the way DTMark!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SarahBell said:

What do you need a receptionist for?

Can that not be automated?

It can. But our practice refused to let more than 5% of appointments be allocated online, and I think has actually stopped it now. There's also an automated booking system you can opt for.

 

 

People and their bloody gadgets. Why can't we just do it the old way rather than implementing more crap to keep people in work ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have much experience with the quack's (haven't been for 20 years) but needed to call this morning to make an appointment for my teenager (who also hasn't been for probably 10 years). Was given an appointment in three weeks.

This would be OK except that he is being sick every day - not badly, so must be a reaction to something - but school rules state that he cannot attend withing 24 hours of vomiting. 

So theoretically three weeks off for a minor ailment and he is fine 99% of the time. I wonder if we went on holiday would I get the fine for taking him out of school?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, CunningPlan said:

I don't have much experience with the quack's (haven't been for 20 years) but needed to call this morning to make an appointment for my teenager (who also hasn't been for probably 10 years). Was given an appointment in three weeks.

This would be OK except that he is being sick every day - not badly, so must be a reaction to something - but school rules state that he cannot attend withing 24 hours of vomiting. 

So theoretically three weeks off for a minor ailment and he is fine 99% of the time. I wonder if we went on holiday would I get the fine for taking him out of school?

You have to call first thing the surgery opens.

You have to say it's urgent (even if it isn't).

Don't say he isn't being sick badly. Big it up - he's being sick repeatedly, has an aversion to light etc. Even if he's been doing this for weeks don't tell them. Say it's just come on. Tell them you are worried and he must see a doctor urgently.

Play the system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JoeDavola said:

Very interesting indeed. I now have a 3 week wait to see a GP. 3 weeks to spend 10 minutes talking to someone.

I can see businesses like this taking off big time all over the UK if they can stay at this price point. Does the price start to ramp up big-time once you have to order blood tests and the like?

Good to see you back by the way DTMark!

Thanks :)

It includes certain tests as part of an overall health check.

I needed some additional tests to diagnose a problem which turned out to be wheat intolerance.

IIRC the bill for the additional tests was about £140 and I got to keep the documents - he explained them (and what the problem was) and then gave them to me to take away.

The issue I had, had been plaguing me for years. I recall posting a long time back about some sleepless nights, itching and other random symptoms. Wasn't a thyroid issue after all.

From call to book appointment to diagnosis was just days.

1 minute ago, the gardener said:

You have to call first thing the surgery opens.

You have to say it's urgent (even if it isn't).

Don't say he isn't being sick badly. Big it up - he's being sick repeatedly, has an aversion to light etc. Even if he's been doing this for weeks don't tell them. Say it's just come on. Tell them you are worried and he must see a doctor urgently.

Play the system.

Are elderly people exempted from this "He who shouts the loudest" style of prioritisation?

Is there a policy, stated or not, of always seeing people over the age of 60 ASAP, and this is one of the things that has led to the scenario we find ourselves in where only people over 60 can readily get appointments because there is now no way for the GP practice to run some kind of diary system if a dozen elderly people can drive a coach-and-horses through it within five minutes of the surgery opening?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, DTMark said:

Thanks :)

It includes certain tests as part of an overall health check.

I needed some additional tests to diagnose a problem which turned out to be wheat intolerance.

IIRC the bill for the additional tests was about £140 and I got to keep the documents - he explained them (and what the problem was) and then gave them to me to take away.

The issue I had, had been plaguing me for years. I recall posting a long time back about some sleepless nights, itching and other random symptoms. Wasn't a thyroid issue after all.

From call to book appointment to diagnosis was just days.

Are elderly people exempted from this "He who shouts the loudest" style of prioritisation?

Is there a policy, stated or not, of always seeing people over the age of 60 ASAP, and this is one of the things that has led to the scenario we find ourselves in where only people over 60 can readily get appointments because there is now no way for the GP practice to run some kind of diary system if a dozen elderly people can drive a coach-and-horses through it within five minutes of the surgery opening?

I just think it's a case of people over 60 have more free time (generally retired) and can take any appointment given, mix that in with the fact they have on going conditions and way more likely to be going in the first place (i.e. for they younger people it's illness, for the elderly their bodies giving up with age) and you get in to a cycle of repeat visits. They go in once a month and immediately book another appointment on the way out. 

My own experience has been in areas with more younger people it's been much easier to see a doctor quickly, the older the general population the longer it takes. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, happy_renting said:

Thanks, that's a useful tip,

Are they always called Richard?


no, but you can find out who your practice manager is by looking on
http://www.nhs.uk/Service-Search/GP/LocationSearch/4
under Staff, Reception & administration staff

Mine told me about the patient consultation group - a  quarterly forum of users to help shape and suggest improvements. So I went a couple of times to that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, DTMark said:

Is there a policy, stated or not, of always seeing people over the age of 60 ASAP, and this is one of the things that has led to the scenario we find ourselves in where only people over 60 can readily get appointments because there is now no way for the GP practice to run some kind of diary system if a dozen elderly people can drive a coach-and-horses through it within five minutes of the surgery opening?

 

Ours said that many appointments are taken up every month by the same people - who insist on booking repeat appointments for feedback after test results - even if the test results are negative - etc. These regulars don't really have anything wrong with them but want the doctor to talk to. Which is something I'd heard another GP say many years ago. 

I don't know how they allocate on old age, but I was told kids under 2 get seen same day if they need a doctor. 

You only have to read through a review like this to get the sense that some people use the doctors a lot more than others.
My husband and I changed our GP Surgery to Medlock Medical Practice about 3 years ago as we could never get an appointment at our usual surgery. Since this time we have never looked back. We have needed more medical help than ever this year and I dread to think how it would have been for us had we not changed to this practice. The staff are courteous and helpful and we can always get an appointment. In an emergency their 'Book on the Day' facility is fantastic and means we can confidently be assured we will be seen. We have regular blood tests with the nurse and the results are added to our medical files within a couple of days so we are never kept waiting for the outcome. If we have any queries the reception staff are able to direct us to the correct member of staff. The doctors are excellent. Our consultations are timely, thorough and professional. I have even had minor surgery here. The doctor was so caring and gentle and the results are excellent. We have been referred to other Medics outside the practice and this has been handled with speed and efficiency by the Practice secretary who spoke to us to clarify some details. It is also very reassuring to see the Practice Manager very much in attendance and there to support the staff and help the patients when necessary.We saw a Locum PG there recently who was excellent and explained everything they were suggesting in great detail. During this consultation there were 2 trainee GP's with them and we felt they were as impressed as we were. In comparison to lots of the other patients who attend this practise we are new patients to this surgery but we cant praise it highly enough and wish we had moved a long time ago. We feel cared for, looked after and valued and a lot healthier which is our main concern. We cannot rate this practise highly enough and thank those involved most sincerely.

http://www.nhs.uk/Services/GP/ReviewsAndRatings/DefaultView.aspx?id=36222
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CunningPlan said:

I don't have much experience with the quack's (haven't been for 20 years) but needed to call this morning to make an appointment for my teenager (who also hasn't been for probably 10 years). Was given an appointment in three weeks.

This would be OK except that he is being sick every day - not badly, so must be a reaction to something - but school rules state that he cannot attend withing 24 hours of vomiting. 

So theoretically three weeks off for a minor ailment and he is fine 99% of the time. I wonder if we went on holiday would I get the fine for taking him out of school?

 

1 hour ago, DTMark said:

Are elderly people exempted from this "He who shouts the loudest" style of prioritisation?

Is there a policy, stated or not, of always seeing people over the age of 60 ASAP, and this is one of the things that has led to the scenario we find ourselves in where only people

over 60 can readily get appointments because there is now no way for the GP practice to run some kind of diary system if a dozen elderly people can drive a coach-and-horses through it within five minutes of the surgery opening?

 

This is the sort of thing I'm talking about.

I speak with the over 60s around here and they all know the system -- what days are quieter, which doctors to see, when you have to call, what you have to say to get a same day appointment.  I don't particularly mind (as they probably need more medical intervention), but I do mind that everyone else has to play by those rules.

Surely, if you've got a child (who's not seen much of the doctor for years) suddenly appearing with acute symptoms, see them that day.  It is probably something that needs to be attended to.  Same if you've got a guy who's not been in the surgery for 20 years.  They have all this information, they just have no incentive to do anything other than just make things inconvenient for everyone*.

*[the system works by regulating demand by making things inconvenient, thus dissuading the hypochondriac.  But that guy who's not been to the surgery for 20 years isn't the problem.]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DTMark said:

Thanks :)

It includes certain tests as part of an overall health check.

I needed some additional tests to diagnose a problem which turned out to be wheat intolerance.

IIRC the bill for the additional tests was about £140 and I got to keep the documents - he explained them (and what the problem was) and then gave them to me to take away.

The issue I had, had been plaguing me for years. I recall posting a long time back about some sleepless nights, itching and other random symptoms. Wasn't a thyroid issue after all.

From call to book appointment to diagnosis was just days.

Are elderly people exempted from this "He who shouts the loudest" style of prioritisation?

Is there a policy, stated or not, of always seeing people over the age of 60 ASAP, and this is one of the things that has led to the scenario we find ourselves in where only people over 60 can readily get appointments because there is now no way for the GP practice to run some kind of diary system if a dozen elderly people can drive a coach-and-horses through it within five minutes of the surgery opening?

Being closer to 70 than 60 I still would expect to wait around two weeks for an appointment.

Funny thing is, I was chatting to the GP recently and he reckoned that if he were allowed to work anothre couple of hours a day there would be no long waits to see him. I should have asked him who is restricting his hours, is it the NHS?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, the gardener said:

You have to call first thing the surgery opens.

You have to say it's urgent (even if it isn't).

Don't say he isn't being sick badly. Big it up - he's being sick repeatedly, has an aversion to light etc. Even if he's been doing this for weeks don't tell them. Say it's just come on. Tell them you are worried and he must see a doctor urgently.

Play the system.

Break the system - use *A&E.

I did recently. Doesn't seem so bad to get seen in 3-4 hours.

*My GP offered me an appointment in three week so too.

The private practice is looking like an increasingly better alternative. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a real postcode lottery. Although practically every reception has their pet dragon. Some receptions even have five all working together on the same day on a quiet Friday afternoon with seemingly nothing to do but chat.  In fairness that probably happens in a lot of businesses at that time of the week - but most are savvy not to be so conspicuous. 

Strangely, my parents reckon that after 60 they no longer care and try to manage down expectations. 

Personally, I've been twice in the last decade. Missus is one of the regulars though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh the other interesting thing is that some NHS GP's are 'drop in' surgeries where you can just turn up. Don't get why some are drop in and some are appointment only - anyone know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, JoeDavola said:

Oh the other interesting thing is that some NHS GP's are 'drop in' surgeries where you can just turn up. Don't get why some are drop in and some are appointment only - anyone know?

Our walk in centre is just nurses. A GP is sometimes available (to the nurses not directly) to write prescriptions, but even that's highly variable. If you go there the nurses can usually get you in to see your GP the same day, even though the receptionist insisted there was nothing available for 8 weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Result - Mrs CP rang them this morning. Nothing was going to stop her lioness attitude to getting her son seen. Got a same day appointment.

My approach was going to be to point out to them that they had received the best part of £6000 in capitation fees on my behalf and this would be only our second visit. If they didn't make an immediate appointment available I would take my custom elsewhere and they could use the free space on their list to have yet another whinging frequent flyer loss making boomer.

That is why Mrs CP made the call.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   93 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.