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tyres

Construction just got a lot faster ?

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End of brickies? Robotic Hadrian X can build a house in just two days

 

Hadrian X is a robot that can lay 1,000 bricks an hour from a stationary position and build a house in just two days.

 

more here...

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It's all amazing and transforming. But until we solve the issue with credit, speculation and land values; fairly meaningless.

The cost of the bricks and laying is fairly immaterial to the cost of everything else.

 

It just means Persimmon will sell you a home for 300k made by robots instead of a home for 300k made by people.

Edited by honkydonkey

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So they've removed the local economy at the same time as all those brickies eat food, lived some place and generally contributed more then their trade.

Anyhow it doesnt look like it would pass a visit from building control on heat loss; some of bricks are 20mm apart so why bother spreading 4mm of hot glue on them?

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34 minutes ago, giggler000 said:

and I might add there's something odd with this forum and a fascination with robots as it seems like every week there's another thread like this :wacko:

It's not us... it's the rest of the world. They are smitten with them.

Don't shoot the messenger.  

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1 hour ago, tyres said:

End of brickies? Robotic Hadrian X can build a house in just two days

 

Hadrian X is a robot that can lay 1,000 bricks an hour from a stationary position and build a house in just two days.

 

more here...

 

35 minutes ago, hotairmail said:

What is sticking those bricks together?

Actually this reminds me of so many programming 'problems'. That they try and imitate the process they are replacing. Actually what is really required is total innovation - re-design the process from top to bottom and then apply the new technology to it. Replicate laying bricks in situ...hahahahaha

 

 

 

 

Glue, if you watch carefully it is spraying some type of glue on the bottom of the bricks before laying them.

To be fair they are not quite old style bricks, and if you could get the robot to lay interlocking ceramic blocks such as Porotherm you would have a good building system. You would if you could get brickies to lay them, but you can't (I have tried) as the brickies are more than bright enough to realise that replacing bricks with a system that's 5 times faster and requires less skill would not be good for their long term employment prospects.

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It may be glued , but if you put house in the real world with settlement combined with bricks/blocks stuck that close , you'd have  stress cracks everywhere. Essentially what they have there is a brick stacker and not a housebuilder imho.

D

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5 hours ago, Dames said:

It may be glued , but if you put house in the real world with settlement combined with bricks/blocks stuck that close , you'd have  stress cracks everywhere. Essentially what they have there is a brick stacker and not a housebuilder imho.

D

There are a number of building methods that use these "thin bed morters". Porotherm and Aircrete are two examples, you can also do it with standard breezeblocks. They produce a stronger more airtight and better insulated wall. 

Settlement isn't an issue with modern foundations, as the foundation continues to provide a rigid base even if the whole house settles.

Edited by Confusion of VIs

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5 hours ago, Saving For a Space Ship said:

Hopefully bricks will become a thing of the past, as they take a lot of energy to make & are thermally inefficient compared to SIPS panels   ..

The conservative / VI nature of house builders seem to keep them going

It will take a long time,  a couple of year ago I looked into a self build using  MgO SIPS or Prothem blocks for the structure but getting interest from local builders was impossible and the local council could not even advise on what the would require to meet building regs.      

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27 minutes ago, Confusion of VIs said:

There are a number of building methods that use these "thin bed morters". Porotherm and Aircrete are two examples, you can also do it with standard breezeblocks. They produce a stronger more airtight and better insulated wall. 

Settlement isn't an issue with modern foundations, as the foundation continues to provide a rigid base even if the whole house settles.

Theres always settlement imho. I know of the thin jointsystems , looked into it when i was considering selfbuild . However after being in construction for many years i know in my own mind that i personally wouldnt use such a system. Just my opinion tho'.

Also i priced up some work in thin joint house undergoing construction , i managed to get my hand in the crack that opened up on the external wall. It was the builders own house too which hed decided to test the system on , bonkers .

D :+)

Edited by Dames
added anecdote.

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1 hour ago, Dames said:

Theres always settlement imho. I know of the thin jointsystems , looked into it when i was considering selfbuild . However after being in construction for many years i know in my own mind that i personally wouldnt use such a system. Just my opinion tho'.

Also i priced up some work in thin joint house undergoing construction , i managed to get my hand in the crack that opened up on the external wall. It was the builders own house too which hed decided to test the system on , bonkers .

D :+)

I was looking at an insulated slab foundation, so if I had differential settlement in that I would have had a bigger problem than a few cracks in the walls.

Anyway the costings I received made the project uneconomic for anything other than standard brick and block.

 

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15 minutes ago, Confusion of VIs said:

I was looking at an insulated slab foundation, so if I had differential settlement in that I would have had a bigger problem than a few cracks in the walls.

Anyway the costings I received made the project uneconomic for anything other than standard brick and block.

 

 

Exactly the same for me. 

 

£50-70k for SIPS once I managed to track down someone who supplied them and would do the work. 

£31k for bricks and mortar.

The reason for the vastly higher SIPS quote was nobody local knew what I was talking about and I was going to have to pay for people to stay somewhere during the 2 week build.

 

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5 hours ago, Timak said:

 

Exactly the same for me. 

 

£50-70k for SIPS once I managed to track down someone who supplied them and would do the work. 

£31k for bricks and mortar.

The reason for the vastly higher SIPS quote was nobody local knew what I was talking about and I was going to have to pay for people to stay somewhere during the 2 week build.

 

£19k-39k extra - where were you going to put them up? In the Ritz!

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On 01/10/2016 at 4:45 PM, Timak said:

 

Exactly the same for me. 

 

£50-70k for SIPS once I managed to track down someone who supplied them and would do the work. 

£31k for bricks and mortar.

The reason for the vastly higher SIPS quote was nobody local knew what I was talking about and I was going to have to pay for people to stay somewhere during the 2 week build.

 

Quote
  On 01/10/2016 at 4:27 PM, Confusion of VIs said:

I was looking at an insulated slab foundation, so if I had differential settlement in that I would have had a bigger problem than a few cracks in the walls.

Anyway the costings I received made the project uneconomic for anything other than standard brick and block.

It's ridiculous, considering SIPS have been around for over 50 yrs. Smacks of a conspiracy. Considering they are putting PIR sheets /  kingspan in the cavity wall anyway its crazy. 

I would have thought some EU lca energy  usage regs would have come in by now, but perhaps the corp brick / building lobby got to the EU.  

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