Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

cica

American Interstates And Tyre Blowouts

Recommended Posts

I've driven a lot in the UK and Spain. I've driven around quite a lot of Eastern Europe. I've recently driven a few thousand miles in the US.

One thing I simply cannot explain is the sheer amount of rubber from tyre blowouts on the US interstate system. It's just a continuous parade of rubber carcasses for as long as you drive every few hundred meters.

Any ideas why? Do they not have MOT and checks and just drive until they explode? Or do they just make sure they are pushed on to the side of the road and do no more and they stay there for years?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colour of the roads over there ? Generally much lighter. Maybe there are lots here too and you just don't notice them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are indeed vastly more there than anywhere else I've been and as I see regular rubbish collection by gangs of prisoners it's not like they don't clear them up regularly.

I don't know why but my guess would be that as their trucks have multiple axles with wheels close together, and I have seen pickups with doubled tyres at the back, then they may just may be running tyres to destruction as am individual blow out wouldn't stop one of these getting to the next town for a new one.

There is also that some southern states do not have an equivalent of an annual MoT requirement so if you want to run your pickup on four tyres worn down to the canvas then you can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard that, like Australia, there are no MOT-type tests in the States.

Australia has an MOT equivalent. The rules are just different.

However, the number of wrecks on US roads never fails to amaze me. I was at a set of lights last week and a guy pulls up in a battered old Impreza that looked like it was being held together by parcel tape and to top it off two of his wheels were space savers. I spontaneously started laughing when I saw it, then stopped when I considered that laughing at someone's car might be considered gravely offensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that it was because they still use radial tyres (old design with no inner chamber), which blow out very easily, making this a regular "everyday" occurrence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought that it was because they still use radial tyres (old design with no inner chamber), which blow out very easily, making this a regular "everyday" occurrence.

Radial tires are the current standard pretty much everywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our semi trucks have typically six axles versus their five but only have 14 wheels versus their 18 so they're running another 4 tyres.

A lot of rubber may not be blowouts, as such but, tread separation from poor quality remoulds. Blowouts tend to be caused by overheating of the tyres. Against this country they drive much longer distances without stopping and drive faster.

Blowouts on a truck are expensive, certainly here, can easily be £1000 if the tyre damages lights and mudflaps etc. So you would think they would make an effort to minimise it. Tyre pressure monitoring would do a lot to prevent but hasn't really been embraced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are we sure this is not a truckers site?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wagon tyres in the UK are regularly recut.

Tyre fitters have a special tool which does it. Worn off the tread.... No worry lets cut another.

Steering axle tyres always move backwards. Recuts never go on the front axle New tyres only when they wear down.

Can't really comment on the blowouts in the US, except to say I driven a few thousand miles over there and not really noticed it. Only other thing I would add is that on some of the more rural freeways you are often the only vehicle on the road as far as the eye can see.

The M25 it certainly ain't.

Have driven probably 250,000> UK truck miles and never ever suffered a blowout, few punctures of course and you don't always notice on a double wheel axle but not the one which went bang.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Increased cost of labour has made recutting make less sense these days. Biggest tyre fitters ATS don't really push it although they're owned by Michelin so have a VI in flogging new tyres.

It is legal to put recuts on the steering axle though can see why some might not want to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can the tyres be recut once only? I used to see it regularly done at a place I used to work and was left wondering quite how such a primitive process was allowed, the new tread was just a sort of wavy line, dunno if truck dynamics/weight make the tread pattern less critical compared to eg a car, with the water dispersing sipes etc but it seemed like a cheapo route. What is the cost difference versus extra miles obtained?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not just America, they're all over the roads in Canada, too. I assume truck drivers drive their retread tires until the tread falls off, then get a new one.

It's worth noting that the distance between this city and the next one on the highway is roughly the same as the distance from London to Edinburgh. One of my girlfriend's truck-driving relatives used to drive that every day, delivering aviation fuel. So I'm not really surprised that trucks would get through a lot of tires.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   90 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.