Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

spyguy

Problem Areas For Obesity In The Uk

Recommended Posts

"They are big users of the internet - so they don't even go out to shop anymore and do a lot of their socialising using social media and they just become more and more trapped."

Right I'm going out for another walk this morning :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have spent an awful lot of time in N Devon lately (very sick friend and just now back for the funeral) and have to say N Devon seems to have a lot more than its fair share of hefty lardarses.

If Wales has even more it must be pretty bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

South Wales namely the Valleys. Isn't Caerphilly the fattest place in the UK? I'm not surprised, I'd probably overeat if I lived in some of the little towns in the Valleys - grim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a cycle path around Swansea Bay. In some places it is very wide - like two car widths - and last week I was cycling along when I came behind two women walking beside one another. They were so wide that I had to slow and think about how to negotiate getting past them.

It does not surprise me that the Welsh have this problem. The amount of crud I see people stick in their shopping baskets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it would really help if our transport policy revolved more around these things. There's a large degree of inertia in really hilly areas like parts of Wales and Scotland, where people rely heavily on the car and infrequent bus services. Perhaps the electric bike could be a part of the solution?

cervelo-r2-105-211656-15.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a cycle path around Swansea Bay. In some places it is very wide - like two car widths - and last week I was cycling along when I came behind two women walking beside one another. They were so wide that I had to slow and think about how to negotiate getting past them.

It does not surprise me that the Welsh have this problem. The amount of crud I see people stick in their shopping baskets.

Whenever I see something like this I think "These are the ones who are out walking", like when I see a fat jogger and I give them a silent cheer.

It's the ones who aren't out and doing something about it that you need to worry about; but you don't see them except upon mobility scooters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You obviously haven't been to Chippenham (market town half way along the M4). Depends on the day you visit but when most people are at work there are an awful lot waddling up the high street or battling their way through with mobility scooters....also a lot with sticks who don't have any obvious impairment to justify them. Why is it that the fattest seem to wear the least amount of clothing? Either that or the tightest leggings etc. Sometimes I have to look away :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You obviously haven't been to Chippenham (market town half way along the M4). Depends on the day you visit but when most people are at work there are an awful lot waddling up the high street or battling their way through with mobility scooters....also a lot with sticks who don't have any obvious impairment to justify them. Why is it that the fattest seem to wear the least amount of clothing? Either that or the tightest leggings etc. Sometimes I have to look away :rolleyes:

Well ... the market days sees the population at their worse.

This is pretty much wjhar market days look like:

http://judgedredd.wikia.com/wiki/League_of_Fatties

When I first read this, it was funny. Now it seems prescient.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whenever I see something like this I think "These are the ones who are out walking", like when I see a fat jogger and I give them a silent cheer.

It's the ones who aren't out and doing something about it that you need to worry about; but you don't see them except upon mobility scooters.

Yes, good point. I always think that the chubby joggers are giving it a go. But it did cross my mind, with these two ladies, that they were walking so slowly that few calories were being burnt off... especially as at least one appeared to have some kind of chocolate bar in her hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When doing the weekly shop at the big supermarket in Cardiff I often like to park in a 'family' space that is nearish to the entrance and has extra width to help with getting the sprogs in/out, though there are surprisingly very few of them, so not always possible. There are however loads of disabled spaces, about three times as many.

This used to puzzle me, until I spent half an hour sitting in the car as my wife did the shop (son asleep in the back of the car) and watching car after car arrive into these spaces and relatively young but massively obese people getting out and waddling into the shop (sometimes with stick or other mobility aid). I was totally shocked. You're not disabled, you cheeky ******s, you're just fat! If anything, they should be forced to walk a bit further!

I couldn't work out if they actually had disabled badges (ie officially justified, though still BS if you ask me) or were just taking the p!ss because they are lazy lardbuckets.

Rant over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I started off by just doing 25 sit ups per day and now I`m up to 46. I`ll just continue to do one extra until I get to 80 (in 2 minutes)

According to youtube 80 is up to the standard of US navy seals.......probably a gay club of somekind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right. I'll give you my opinion, but I'm sure not many will agree - argue away.

I think that this has quite a bit to do with the way our bodies are built to cope with carbohydrate loading, and very much in particular evolutionarily 'newer' more easily digestible carbohydrates such as found in wheat (and, in a more modern sense, sugar - but wheat is very rapidly broken down into glucose in the gut).

Populations who have a genetic ancestry which incorporates large plains (and similar geographical areas) will have exposure to these grains etc and will have a digestive system (including gut microflora) which can cope with these inputs; as a result these individuals will have a mesomorphic or even asthenic body.

Others have a genetic ancestry which doesn't include too much in the way of these carbohydrates - for example, the classic Welsh/celtic ancestry won't have much access to wheat, although there would have been moderate quantities of oats and barley - but even as flour these are harder/slower to digest compared with wheat (Not sure why - soluble dietary fibre perhaps) .

In our modern world there is an over-abundance of more readily digestible carbs, particularly newer wheats and sugars - with the result that those with the 'wrong' genetic ancestry will be much more likely to have a physiological response of laying down fat.

Now, I know that exercise / sedentary behaviour has a lot to do with it - but it would be my thesis that the sedentary behaviour comes as a result of the laying down of fat, not the other way around. Of course, once the response has set in (ie, you've become obese) it becomes relatively harder to correct this behaviour, and you get a positive feedback loop of the individual getting fatter and fatter.

IMO the way to deal with the problem would be to advise susceptible populations (which would be easy to identify, as it = areas where there at loads of fat people) to not eat carbohydrates. This would go against the modern dietary method, and I'd accept that it might not give optimal nutrition (maybe an increased risk of heart attack compared with the average person), but I'd say that the health impact of everyone being morbidly obese is worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nobody on the biggest loser show anywhere in the World has failed to lose a huge amount of weight by simply increasing exercise and reducing calorie intake.

Of course the abundance of sugars and processed foods and all the rest of it is important - but it's basic calories in vs out that really matters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right. I'll give you my opinion, but I'm sure not many will agree - argue away.

I think that this has quite a bit to do with the way our bodies are built to cope with carbohydrate loading, and very much in particular evolutionarily 'newer' more easily digestible carbohydrates such as found in wheat (and, in a more modern sense, sugar - but wheat is very rapidly broken down into glucose in the gut).

Populations who have a genetic ancestry which incorporates large plains (and similar geographical areas) will have exposure to these grains etc and will have a digestive system (including gut microflora) which can cope with these inputs; as a result these individuals will have a mesomorphic or even asthenic body.

Others have a genetic ancestry which doesn't include too much in the way of these carbohydrates - for example, the classic Welsh/celtic ancestry won't have much access to wheat, although there would have been moderate quantities of oats and barley - but even as flour these are harder/slower to digest compared with wheat (Not sure why - soluble dietary fibre perhaps) .

In our modern world there is an over-abundance of more readily digestible carbs, particularly newer wheats and sugars - with the result that those with the 'wrong' genetic ancestry will be much more likely to have a physiological response of laying down fat.

Now, I know that exercise / sedentary behaviour has a lot to do with it - but it would be my thesis that the sedentary behaviour comes as a result of the laying down of fat, not the other way around. Of course, once the response has set in (ie, you've become obese) it becomes relatively harder to correct this behaviour, and you get a positive feedback loop of the individual getting fatter and fatter.

IMO the way to deal with the problem would be to advise susceptible populations (which would be easy to identify, as it = areas where there at loads of fat people) to not eat carbohydrates. This would go against the modern dietary method, and I'd accept that it might not give optimal nutrition (maybe an increased risk of heart attack compared with the average person), but I'd say that the health impact of everyone being morbidly obese is worse.

If be surprised if the genetic make up of the old industrial towns in the Valleys was more than 10℅ "welsh". These places had massive inflows of migration into what had been sparsely populated agricultural land to work in the mines and works that set up the modern world during the industrial revolution.

The issue here is that all the jobs went away, and everybody was told to claim on the sick, rather than the dole, so that the stats would look better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If be surprised if the genetic make up of the old industrial towns in the Valleys was more than 10℅ "welsh". These places had massive inflows of migration into what had been sparsely populated agricultural land to work in the mines and works that set up the modern world during the industrial revolution.

The issue here is that all the jobs went away, and everybody was told to claim on the sick, rather than the dole, so that the stats would look better.

Yep, longer-term back in the 80s it would have been cheaper to simply close the Valleys down and move everyone to the coast or back to Devon & Cornwall.

But there was so much history in the Valleys - in truth, less than a hundred years - that it just became hugely political. After Thatcher closed the pits down everyone spent 30 years wanting the pits re-opened. Then Corbyn turns up, wants to re-open the pits and everyone tells him to feck off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If be surprised if the genetic make up of the old industrial towns in the Valleys was more than 10℅ "welsh". These places had massive inflows of migration into what had been sparsely populated agricultural land to work in the mines and works that set up the modern world during the industrial revolution.

Yes, concentrated poverty rather than genetics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If be surprised if the genetic make up of the old industrial towns in the Valleys was more than 10℅ "welsh". These places had massive inflows of migration into what had been sparsely populated agricultural land to work in the mines and works that set up the modern world during the industrial revolution.

The issue here is that all the jobs went away, and everybody was told to claim on the sick, rather than the dole, so that the stats would look better.

Doesn't matter if they're Welsh - it is the sort of agricultural existence they came from. I doubt that there were loads of incomers into the Welsh coalfields from Norfolk. Most of the migration came from elsewhere in Wales, border counties (Somerset, Gloucestershire) and Devon/Cornwall (because of their mining history). There was migration from other areas, but mainly the poorer ones - parts of Scotland and Ireland. The immigration from Russia, Italy, Spain, etc, (which there is no doubt occurred), was relatively minor in comparison.

It might be interesting to compare fatness from the ex mining valleys of Wales with the former dockyard areas around Pembroke. There is quite a bit of poverty around there but the genetic diversity of west Pembrokeshire is interesting (compared with other parts of Wales).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't matter if they're Welsh - it is the sort of agricultural existence they came from. I doubt that there were loads of incomers into the Welsh coalfields from Norfolk. Most of the migration came from elsewhere in Wales, border counties (Somerset, Gloucestershire) and Devon/Cornwall (because of their mining history). There was migration from other areas, but mainly the poorer ones - parts of Scotland and Ireland. The immigration from Russia, Italy, Spain, etc, (which there is no doubt occurred), was relatively minor in comparison.

It might be interesting to compare fatness from the ex mining valleys of Wales with the former dockyard areas around Pembroke. There is quite a bit of poverty around there but the genetic diversity of west Pembrokeshire is interesting (compared with other parts of Wales).

Parts of the Welsh-speaking Taffia have recently been using genetic DNA testing to proudly boast that they are pure Welsh - it reminded me of the Eugenics of the late 1800s/early 1900s and the Nazis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonder if there is a correlation between density of TC gourging and degree of fatness? Seems a lot of the population of "impoverished" areas are waddlers. Presumably they send their 24 hours not working, eating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest, on a per head basis I think Middlesborugh is the furthest ahead.

Aye, you might think that - but there is a limiting factor.

The low oxygen, highly-polluted atmosphere in the 'Boro means there's a maximum sustainable weight of about 35 stone - beyond which point you simply suffocate to death...

;)

XYY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a cycle path around Swansea Bay. In some places it is very wide - like two car widths - and last week I was cycling along when I came behind two women walking beside one another. They were so wide that I had to slow and think about how to negotiate getting past them.

It does not surprise me that the Welsh have this problem. The amount of crud I see people stick in their shopping baskets.

I used to run along there when I lived in Swansea. Sometimes me and my young lady would walk to the Mumbles along that path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If be surprised if the genetic make up of the old industrial towns in the Valleys was more than 10℅ "welsh". These places had massive inflows of migration into what had been sparsely populated agricultural land to work in the mines and works that set up the modern world during the industrial revolution.

The issue here is that all the jobs went away, and everybody was told to claim on the sick, rather than the dole, so that the stats would look better.

Apparently when they discovered iron ore on the north Yorks coast, many of the miners/ diggers migrated in from Wales. Seems to me that the population of the 1800s was far more transient than we think. Perhaps this has always been the way and today's economic migrants are just doing what others closer to home have always done. But, the difference is that now, there is the ability to cross seas and vast numbers of miles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   34 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.