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RichM

How The Wheels Came Off Uk Plc

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How the wheels came off UK plc

Erm, so what are you saying Dave, Gordon and Tony have f*cked it up? :lol::lol::lol:

Post thatcher advantage. What a tosser. 1 in 10 unemployed. It was a tottal disaster. They might have been profligate with public spending but the Torries made a bigger mess of it. I cant see how a return to the dark ages is going to improve my quality of life. L A ******* LOL.

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Post thatcher advantage. What a tosser. 1 in 10 unemployed. It was a tottal disaster. [jellybean]

If you add the increase in student numbers under Labour to the number of economically inactive jobless people who say they want a job the total is around 4.5 million or 1 in 10 of the adult population.

'Focus: How the wheels came off UK plc':

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,20...04099_1,00.html

“Perhaps the most depressing feature of the latest figures is the sharp rise in unemployment to above 1.5m,” said John Philpott, chief economist at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. “When combined with the number of economically inactive jobless people who say that they want a job this raises the total number of people who want to work above 3.5m.”

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i'm a doommonger re-our economy principally because of the state of the public finances............The large trade deficit is to be expected if demand here is stronger than in most other countries and will diminish somewhat with the forthcoming slump in demand.............

but the public finance situation ( already as dire as you expect in a slump) is heading for a crisis of Argentine proportions when the slump comes......The idiots have created a million new public sector jobs since 97 the cost which has far outweighed the large (and largely hidden) increases in taxation...........

Edited by Michael

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Melodramatic? If only it were. Make no mistake, thousands will commit suicide in the years to come, as a result of unbearable financial hardship. That's one aspect of economics that they don't tend to teach you at school/uni.

Jobless rise threatens growth

No necessarily melodramatic

Back in the 80’s a guy that lived in the next street to us got in a lot of debt (approx 20K from memory)

It got to him so much that he cracked one day and shot his wife and three kids and then himself

Problem was he survived and eventually we he was fit enough to be tried, the judge had a slight dilemma, he had no recollection of his actions, because he had lot a lost a lot of his brain, including the bit that controls your memory

He eventually got 6 years

This is an extreme case, but it serves to remind me that for some, debt can lead to some serious problems and a lot of people underestimate the long term implications

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Guest Riser
Inside the oak-panelled room the star turn was Lord Kinnock, the former Labour leader, who was openly criticising the prime minister for the first time. In a speech full of references to solidarity and socialism, and quotes from Gramsci, said he could not accept the “dreadful shattering of the school system . . .”

If there was ever a signal that the Blair era was coming to a close this was surely it — the return of the “Welsh windbag” looking and sounding almost exactly as he did 20 years ago. The only difference, quipped one observer, was that this time he was rallying the militants rather than purging them.

Kinnock and his wife have both had their noses in the European trough now they have had their fill it is no wonder he is willing to turn his attentions back on UK politics.

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nurses on average 30k a year can still be heard in the popular press moaning about there lot.

house price rises in my opinion were a direct result of giving extra money and hiring more people for the public sector.So many people work for the public sector now that its the new economy, lock stock and barrel.

Forget talking of rover or golden wonder, these are mere blips in whats got to hqappen to the public sector, it will also be the final nail in the coffin of the housing boom.

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"Research from the King’s Fund, an independent health watchdog, shows that 59% of the extra money pumped into the NHS since 2001 — the point at which the taps where turned on — has gone on staff pay. Consultants and GPs have had salary increases worth up to 50% over three years, with GPs now earning more than £100,000 a year on average. Nurses have also had substantial increases. "

(From the article)

And GUESS WHO is paying for that largess?

No doubt, a fair share of that going to embattled nurses is to help pay for higher living costs

in places like London

- -

"The best measure of a country’s long-term prosperity is the growth in productivity — output per worker, or output per hour. In his first budget more than eight years ago Brown set out a “productivity agenda”, aimed at closing the gap between Britain and competitor countries. But British workers still produce substantially less every hour than their French, German and American counterparts.

Productivity growth has slowed sharply since 2001, when Blair and Brown turned on the spending taps. Public sector productivity has been falling for the past four years, dragging down the overall figures. The latest figures show output per worker in Britain up by a paltry 0.4% on a year earlier. Measured on a per-hour basis, there was no increase at all. "

HARD TO PRODUCE many productivity gains,

when your economy is based upon tarting up flats and reselling them,

and lending the money to tart up the flats

I don't regard these NHS staff pay rises (for front line staff) as largesse. Perhaps their unions have been intelligent enough to recognise that real inflation has been rampant in the past decade (i.e. they can't afford anywhere to live - doctors and nurses).

They have enough power to maintain their quality of life - doubling in doctor's pay has merely kept pace with reality, not enriched them.

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My partner is a Junior Sister with 15 years nursing experience and 2 degrees.

She works extremely hard, weekends, nights and erratic shift patterns.

Virtually no benefits - 25K a year (which includes her unsociable hours cash).

She is underpaid in the extreme. Nuff said.

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If you add the increase in student numbers under Labour to the number of economically inactive jobless people who say they want a job the total is around 4.5 million or 1 in 10 of the adult population.

Someone studying is the same as being on the dole then? Recipe for ecconomic success for UK PLC? Tory logic, dont you just love it.

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My partner is a Junior Sister with 15 years nursing experience and 2 degrees.

She works extremely hard, weekends, nights and erratic shift patterns.

Virtually no benefits - 25K a year (which includes her unsociable hours cash).

She is underpaid in the extreme. Nuff said.

and no doubt much of that £25k is now eaten up by increased council tax, fuel costs, acommodation costs and other knock on fuel costs - yet inflation is only 2%!

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(...)

- -

"The best measure of a country’s long-term prosperity is the growth in productivity — output per worker, or output per hour. In his first budget more than eight years ago Brown set out a “productivity agenda”, aimed at closing the gap between Britain and competitor countries. But British workers still produce substantially less every hour than their French, German and American counterparts.

Productivity growth has slowed sharply since 2001, when Blair and Brown turned on the spending taps. Public sector productivity has been falling for the past four years, dragging down the overall figures. The latest figures show output per worker in Britain up by a paltry 0.4% on a year earlier. Measured on a per-hour basis, there was no increase at all. "

(...)

I would like to understand how one assesses the productivity of a nurse.

My partner is a Junior Sister with 15 years nursing experience and 2 degrees.

She works extremely hard, weekends, nights and erratic shift patterns.

Virtually no benefits - 25K a year (which includes her unsociable hours cash).

She is underpaid in the extreme. Nuff said.

Doesn't sound untypical I guess.

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nurses on average 30k a year can still be heard in the popular press moaning about there lot.

house price rises in my opinion were a direct result of giving extra money and hiring more people for the public sector.So many people work for the public sector now that its the new economy, lock stock and barrel.

Forget talking of rover or golden wonder, these are mere blips in whats got to hqappen to the public sector, it will also be the final nail in the coffin of the housing boom.

Er what? I wish my wife was on that much. As a degree-qualified Staff Nurse with 10 years experience her gross is about £18k.

AND... her hospital now charges staff to park (£20 month) AND... they are now individually charged for any pens/pencils they need on the ward etc. AND she often has to work unpaid overtime (nurses cannot just down tools and walk out...).

Please don't ever believe that nurses have had fat increases and are now 'well off' - I think the last pay increase gave us about £200 a year in our pcoket.

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I work in HE and we have seen no wage increases apart from 2% for inflation.

Also we are now being told they dont want any of the extra money coming in student fees to go on wages.

And this year the departments are going to be reorganised (read redundancies) and want to cut our pensions.

As I am past 40 I will have to put up with it as I would find it difficult to get a job in the private sector, however

if I was younger I would get out or not take the job in the first place.

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Someone studying is the same as being on the dole then? Recipe for ecconomic success for UK PLC? Tory logic, dont you just love it.

I think there is quite alot of truth in this. The numbers of people in full time further and higher education has rocketed.

I do not believe that all these additional numbers are people who would have gained entry to F&HE 10 or 20 years ago. Evolution simply does not happen that fast!

These numbers are not included in any unemployment stats.

Yet many of the newer style courses are of little value to the economy as a whole. e.g.... Communications Studies, Media Studies, Tourism etc etc.... these skills would have been learnt on the job years ago, with the individual employed and economically active. Further, learning this stuff in college just results in graduates coming out with lots of theory unrelated to the reality of the relevant industry. That's even if they go and work in that industry subsequently.

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Someone studying is the same as being on the dole then? [jellybean]

No. Students who would otherwise be in the workforce or unemployed.

Recipe for economic success for UK PLC? Tory logic, dont you just love it. [jellybean]

I'm not sure what point you're trying to make here. I was merely pointing out that today's official unemployment numbers are not directly comparable with the numbers back in the 1990s. The structure of the potential workforce has changed and the status of many of those not working is different.

Yet many of the newer style courses are of little value to the economy as a whole. e.g.... Communications Studies, Media Studies, Tourism etc etc.... these skills would have been learnt on the job years ago, with the individual employed and economically active. [xian]

...or not as the case may be. Even if the individual were to be employed that may displace someone else. The fact remains that the rise in student numbers has reduced the number of unemployed youngsters. The merits of particular degree courses is another issue entirely.

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I would like to understand how one assesses the productivity of a nurse.

If you want to assess productivity in the NHS it's quite simple, simply look at the length of the waiting lists.

I think there is quite alot of truth in this. The numbers of people in full time further and higher education has rocketed.

How many are on the New Deal... Blair often touted these figures as a good thing in their own right, however they're essentially government supported jobs, jobs that wouldn't exist if it wasn't for public largess, something to tidy up the youth unemployment figures. If a person at work is worth their salt they should be paid at the market rate, regardless of the government.

P.S. This might be of interest

Edited by BuyingBear

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Post thatcher advantage. What a tosser. 1 in 10 unemployed. It was a tottal disaster.

Indeed, a disaster of the "tottal" variety if you bother to read the article :-

Perhaps the most eyecatching number, however, was the number of “economically inactive” people of working age. This rose by 25,000 to 7.94m, the highest since comparable records began in 1971.

There are many reasons for the rise in economic inactivity. It is a direct consequence of higher staying-on rates in schools and higher university participation — 1.85m of the inactive are students, no joke intended. It is also a reflection of past policies designed to massage down the jobless numbers for political reasons.

It includes early retirees (0.6m), and the long-term sick (2.1m). Many of the inactive (2.3m) — and they would dispute this label — are looking after family and home. In all, three-quarters of the inactive say they are not seeking work.

But that leaves just over 2m who say they are. Add that to the 1.5m counted as unemployed and you end up with what John Philpott, chief economist at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, characterises as “underlying joblessness” of 3.5m. Ministers may have chosen the worst moment to get some of the inactive, notably those on incapacity benefit, back into work.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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