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Cost Per Sq Ft In N.i

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I am currently thinking of building in the fermanagh area and was wondering what the average price per square foot is?

Perhaps someone with industry knowledge such as BelfastVI could give me a guesstimate.

Also does the average price include bathroom/kitchen fittings etc?

I already have the land if that helps.

Thanks

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Having the land definitely helps, as does planning permission

It is all dependant on what you want to build. A 1400sqft house that is square and over 2 storeys and without a chimney stack will be much cheaper per ft than an L shaped bungalow with bay windows, a porch and several chimney stacks.

What it includes will also make a difference. As will the spec of wiring, plumbing and the associated fittings.

I believe you can build to passivhaus standards for circa £100 per sqff and that you can get down below £60 per sqff if you build to current regs and keep the shape and finishes simple.

I'd ask local builders and your architect for ball park figures once you decide what you are going to build. Saying that, if you are out of town they will probably only allow you to go up 1.5 storeys and it will need to be white colour through render on the outside. There is also an odd prevelance of houses being so far back from the road that they are wedged back against the rear boundary So that there is no back garden and instead there is a big useless south facing front garden for some bizarre reason that I can not fathom. I guess that must be a planning condition too!

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As the above post states there is a varying range of costs basically because all houses are not the same. Country houses tend to be storey and half requiring larger footprints and wall to floor area.A builder might quote you a price equating to £60 per sq foot but it will be full of PC sums for bathrooms, kitchen, tiling and external works. When all in done you will be doing well to be under the £100 per sq foot.

Passivhaus is not the be all and end all and unless you are really into it its not worth the money. If you focus on lowest life time running cost you will find that you are not far away from a very sustainable and eco house without all the extra cost that come with passivhaus. invest in the fabric insulation and air tightness rather than heat recovery or air sourse etc. Solar is the only alternative source that really works but as a secondary source.

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Can't argue with any of that. If I were building I'd go for the current Scottish regs for insulation as being the standard most suited for Fermanagh/Northern Ireland. A friend of mine who built 7 years ago went to 'about' that standard and he heats the 150m2 house with around 500-600 litres of oil per year. Not bad going.

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Can't argue with any of that. If I were building I'd go for the current Scottish regs for insulation as being the standard most suited for Fermanagh/Northern Ireland. A friend of mine who built 7 years ago went to 'about' that standard and he heats the 150m2 house with around 500-600 litres of oil per year. Not bad going.

NI and Scotland use the same regs

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Apologies, I left out the 'tense' of my statement. I believe the current Scottish regs are a bit more stringent than the current NI regs. My friend achieved 0.2 for walls when he built back in 2008/9(I think) which is inline with the latest Scottish regs (I think ish) as opposed to the 0.3 currently Required here in NI.

Basically, as you suggested, I'd build to the best (easily achieved) standard I could if I were building.

An overall envelope of less than 0.2 with good air tightness and positive ain't input seems like a good way to go and shouldn't be too costly.

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Apologies, I left out the 'tense' of my statement. I believe the current Scottish regs are a bit more stringent than the current NI regs. My friend achieved 0.2 for walls when he built back in 2008/9(I think) which is inline with the latest Scottish regs (I think ish) as opposed to the 0.3 currently Required here in NI.

Basically, as you suggested, I'd build to the best (easily achieved) standard I could if I were building.

An overall envelope of less than 0.2 with good air tightness and positive ain't input seems like a good way to go and shouldn't be too costly.

The new regs here sadly don't give or require a specific, or min U value for walls, floor etc. You perform a SAP cal and basically come up with what you need to obtain the overall result. You can go for fabric (which I would) or compensate heavily with a renewable heat system or a bit or both.

The fabric 'U' values are easily achieved as long as you are prepared to spend and increase the thickness of walls, floors and glazing (and reduce glazing size). doing this however will increase the £ per sq' foot. It is still recommendable up to a certain stage where the return on money is not realy achieved and indeed living in the house can become uncomfortable.

By this I mean solar gain can become uncomfortable and its also nice to light a fire in a house in a winter night. even at current standards both can become a problem.

Edited by BelfastVI

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On a similar topic...

An old school friend has just inherited a site in a town in Tyrone.

Its in the town boundary and previously had permission granted to 25 800 sq ft houses in a terrace type set up.

Does this still work out at 100 sq ft or would it be considerably cheaper?

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On a similar topic...

An old school friend has just inherited a site in a town in Tyrone.

Its in the town boundary and previously had permission granted to 25 800 sq ft houses in a terrace type set up.

Does this still work out at 100 sq ft or would it be considerably cheaper?

25 x 800 square foot?

Of course it's cheaper. Economies of scale apply to building work too.

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Anyone know a rough build cost per sq ft of this type of development or if its even worth doing with the low prices in the west of ulster?

BelfastVI?

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Are 800sqft houses going to sell or even rent in Omagh? That is a small house by any standards and especially so in NI. Townhouses are especially tricky to sell from what I see. With the current state of the market I wouldn't build anything that wasn't done for 'love'. New Developments aromd Enniskillen are sitting for sale and not budging- even with what appear to be rather realistic prices. People are scared of another crash post Brexit and seem to be waiting it out.

Anyone know a rough build cost per sq ft of this type of development or if its even worth doing with the low prices in the west of ulster?

BelfastVI?

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The new regs here sadly don't give or require a specific, or min U value for walls, floor etc. You perform a SAP cal and basically come up with what you need to obtain the overall result. You can go for fabric (which I would) or compensate heavily with a renewable heat system or a bit or both.

The fabric 'U' values are easily achieved as long as you are prepared to spend and increase the thickness of walls, floors and glazing (and reduce glazing size). doing this however will increase the £ per sq' foot. It is still recommendable up to a certain stage where the return on money is not realy achieved and indeed living in the house can become uncomfortable.

By this I mean solar gain can become uncomfortable and its also nice to light a fire in a house in a winter night. even at current standards both can become a problem.

Indeed, I would only opt for a house that meets the minimum target via fabric alone. If it had renewables then it would need a sap score in the A range to interest me, as mid B can be achieved by fabric alone and gives a much better indication of what you are getting regards actual heating costs. The whole trade off thing is a crock and is only there to appease big builders who can't be bothered to move with the times because it impacts on floor area vs footprint.

Are you an architect/surveyor/building control officer??

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There was a good poster on the board called PJ. He showed a figure a number of years ago on the number of plots (mostly repossessed) with planning approval in Tyrone. It was something mad like 20,000.

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25 x 800 square foot?

Of course it's cheaper. Economies of scale apply to building work too.

the smaller the house the more expensive per sq foot it is to build.

the only thing that is close to constant in any building project is the cost from the DPC up and the kerb in. and thats only if you are building the same house type. One 800 sq foot house type or design may cost £10k more to build that another and not obtain any increase in sales value.

the real difference occurs in the cost of the dpc down. is there poor ground, have you fill to bring in, spoil to deport. is their contamination or radon barrier. Has the site to be piled. the design, length and makeup of the roads will have a big impact. is the road single or dual fronted , what is the density per m length. i.e how many houses is the cost of the roads spread over. Is there storm and sewer connections. how much will you have to pay to get connected. is a mini treatment plant needed. will it wpork by gravity or will you have to install a £60k pump. Have you full access and sight lines. are there retaining walls needed or culverts to cover. are there badgers, newts bats owls etc.

are there any external road improvements.

the point I am making is that the cost to build the house on its own is somewhat irrelevant in the overall appraisal. unfortunately many, many so-called developers bought sites on the £40/50 or 60 per sq foot nonsense and ignored all the rest. their mistakes were covered up by rising house prices.

the shocks for anyone building their own house was not the cost of the bricks and blocks or labour but the £20k NIE wanted. The £15k treatment plant not to mention the price of the curtains the wife wants.

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