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CrashedOutAndBurned

Brutal Rises In Cost Of Living

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I'm now noticing a fairly big change among friends, colleagues and acquaintances. I'm calling it the 'The Rise Of The Money Moaners'.

I think the moans started around mid-2004, but now money moaning has become mainstream and everyone's at it. Here are some key money moans that have stood out in the last few weeks:

1. Couple on better-than-average money have big mortgage from a couple of years back, fixed rate ended. Small claustrophobic house. One takes better-paid job, but with big commute. Have got sick of the grind for little reward. Mortgage still feels huge. Hoping to find some cheap area to live in.

2. Single woman on average salary. Big mortgage. Fixed rate ended. Talking about getting a second job. Now brings 'cutting back' into many conversations. Aware of big rises in cost of living - fuel, council tax, insurance, food.

3. Chap's contract ends. Takes job that sounds well below his calibre for half the money. Wife seemed narky about this. Any financial slack?

Everyone, even Eastenders watchers and Heat readers at work, are massively aware of the cost of living racing away, scowling at the thought of 'inflation' pay rises, fully aware of the real-terms pay cuts they are about to suffer.

The VI spinsters are going to have to work three times as hard to paint the usual rosy picture this year, I think. Joe Public isn't going to believe the hype when his pockets are empty.

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Why don't they go and see a mortgage broker? when my fixed term ended I just remortgaged onto another low cost deal. I wasn't charged any fees.

Edited by Peach

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these people are simply 'doom mongers'

why dont they just get another consolidation loan so they end up owing up to 10 times their annual salary.?

Exactly. People should take out loans and use the new loan to fund the repayments of the original loan. Hang on a minute, that is a stupid suggestion. If people did that kind of nonsense, private debt would be over a trillion pounds today.

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I am hoping this will increase the amount of people that need to take in a lodger to pay the bills. I am sure more people will start to see the value of an extra £250 per month, especially when it is tax free (I think).

It would also give me a warm glow to think that I was not helping out a BTL landlord, but making things easier for an OO.

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Council tax will go up by 4.9999999999% nearly everywhere this year, to beat the 5% cap.

Possibly another 20%+ on fuel bills too.

Food will be next.

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I am hoping this will increase the amount of people that need to take in a lodger to pay the bills. I am sure more people will start to see the value of an extra £250 per month, especially when it is tax free (I think).

It would also give me a warm glow to think that I was not helping out a BTL landlord, but making things easier for an OO.

In principle yes, but I would say NEVER live in someone elses home. You never feel like your quite welcome and the boundaries keep changing (I think to constantly assert power).

Anyway, those people are the worst moaners of all since they have had to lower themselves to lodgers to make ends meet, which they tend to think as straigtened circumstances. There is nothing worse than having to live in somebody elses house, have them keep switching the boundaries and moan about things that I'm not able to moan about (eg. if I forget the washing up they will complain, but if they leave their plates in the sink for 3 days, its their house!), and then having to listen to them moan about how poor they are and expect sympathy from the one who can't even afford a house!

The limit against tax is about 375 pm.

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In principle yes, but I would say NEVER live in someone elses home. You never feel like your quite welcome and the boundaries keep changing (I think to constantly assert power).

Anyway, those people are the worst moaners of all since they have had to lower themselves to lodgers to make ends meet, which they tend to think as straigtened circumstances. There is nothing worse than having to live in somebody elses house, have them keep switching the boundaries and moan about things that I'm not able to moan about (eg. if I forget the washing up they will complain, but if they leave their plates in the sink for 3 days, its their house!), and then having to listen to them moan about how poor they are and expect sympathy from the one who can't even afford a house!

:lol: I can laugh about it now! But you're quite correct, it can be blinkin' awful.

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I am hoping this will increase the amount of people that need to take in a lodger to pay the bills. I am sure more people will start to see the value of an extra £250 per month, especially when it is tax free (I think).

It would also give me a warm glow to think that I was not helping out a BTL landlord, but making things easier for an OO.

And I am that lodger. The last few posters are not exactly correct about it being hard for the lodger or OO. Well not in this case anyway. I dont have to do any housework. My bedding is changed for me. There's no bills to pay except food. I have my own mini kitchen and on-suite bathroom. A cleaner comes in once a week. Could life be any better? Aparently my rent just covers their council tax.

I was speaking to the cleaner as she came in this morning and we got onto speaking about rising costs. She said that people thought she was well off because she works extra jobs (like this saturday one) but in reality shes only just managing. She said her council house rent was £240 per month but the council tax was £180! Well this woman isnt exactly what you would call highly educated, but she wasnt taken in by the 2% inflation lie. She said she'd like to go and live in France to escape the cost of living in the UK.

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And I am that lodger. The last few posters are not exactly correct about it being hard for the lodger or OO. Well not in this case anyway. I dont have to do any housework. My bedding is changed for me. There's no bills to pay except food. I have my own mini kitchen and on-suite bathroom. A cleaner comes in once a week. Could life be any better? Aparently my rent just covers their council tax.

Most lodgers have a room not a studio with optional shared living space. This is not lodging in the traditional sense. Very few lodgers would get the cleaner, and if your rent only covers their council tax you are getting a very cheap deal. Nice people? I don't think this is representative of lodging but I am glad that you are having a good life.

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And I am that lodger. The last few posters are not exactly correct about it being hard for the lodger or OO. Well not in this case anyway. I dont have to do any housework. My bedding is changed for me. There's no bills to pay except food. I have my own mini kitchen and on-suite bathroom. A cleaner comes in once a week. Could life be any better? Aparently my rent just covers their council tax.

I don't know why people take in lodgers. If it was due to cash I'd rather sell and downsize than have a stranger move in to my home.

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I don't know why people take in lodgers. If it was due to cash I'd rather sell and downsize than have a stranger move in to my home.

Well some people like to have a nice big house and just have to find a way to do it. They have been clever in that they made a small studio in the house so they dont have me around their space all the time. Pretty sad for them though that all they get out of it is their council tax paid.

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Well some people like to have a nice big house and just have to find a way to do it. They have been clever in that they made a small studio in the house so they dont have me around their space all the time. Pretty sad for them though that all they get out of it is their council tax paid.

This is where the lodger buys into the home owners moaning.

I don't see how it is sad. It is a bill they would have had to pay anyway and you're covering it. They have probably made a compromise about money to get a lodger they like having there. Whats sad about that? Just priorities. And they are doing just fine cause they have a big house that they like and are clearly able to pay off (since your rent for a studio is uber cheap), it doesn't sound like they are starving, or that their kids are being beaten. There are a lot sader things than having to take in a lodger in a situation where they don't even have you around their space all the time. There doing fine.

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I just don't understand this.

Moaners, in NewLabour's New Britain where "things can only get better".

"Miracle Economy", umpteen quarters of continuous growth.

The best Chancellor ever. A Government that knows exactly how you should live your life and how you should think.

This is Heaven on Earth.

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Check out these Ebayers

Dunno whether to laugh (some of bills sound a bit unrealistic) or cry (it all sounds a bit desperate) at this.

And no it's not me (I only have the missus and two computers to support).

mmm s'begging imo.

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Check out these Ebayers

Dunno whether to laugh (some of bills sound a bit unrealistic) or cry (it all sounds a bit desperate) at this.

And no it's not me (I only have the missus and two computers to support).

I am sorry but this is the sort of self indulgence verging on mental instability that got britain in this fix in the first place. What they need is not more money but a bit of a serious reality check, and possibly to go bankrupt. They can't count. Their total outgoings are even more than they say they are (about 60 quid.) When in this sort of crisis the first thing to do if you need to get out of debt is cut back on unneccessary consumption. This is a "things mania".

  • They have 2 cars.

  • They have a television package worth 100 quid a month. That is not a neccessity.

  • They are contributing 10 quid to charity - which in itself is not a bad thing but not when you are unable to feed your self - at that point it is just self indulgence.

  • They are spending 70 quid a month on mobiles.

  • They are also paying for 3 televisions liscences at a variable rate? (1 house 1 liscence?)

  • They are paying 100 quid a month on energy bills - turn off the light when you walk out of the room.

  • Their insurance is over the top. They are spending around 240 quid a month just on insurance. They have very expensive morgage protection cover which could be reduced and both have life cover which while desirable with kids involved is not the first thing that you pay when you are in financial crisis and in a social welfare state. There home and contents insurance comes to 44. Not sure but it seems high.

  • They took out a second loan after the first consolidation loan (Having consolidated once last year they then added 10K worth of debt on top. So how did they end up building up more debt when they knew they were in trouble).

  • The only thing that seems low is the food bill.

They are probably sure that they NEED all these things. They don't. No doubt this family is in chaos in a number of ways and I am sure that things really are as bad as they say they are, but the sustainable solution is not effectively begging on the net. What they need is a reality check and possibly some psychological and practical support around various issues including their insurance mania. From my estimates they could knock 250 to 300 a month off the outgoings by systematic assessment of their "needs". Things would still be tight, but would be likely to be sustainable.

So what gives me the right to judge? Because they are publicly asking me to feel sorry for them.

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In principle yes, but I would say NEVER live in someone elses home. You never feel like your quite welcome and the boundaries keep changing (I think to constantly assert power).

Anyway, those people are the worst moaners of all since they have had to lower themselves to lodgers to make ends meet, which they tend to think as straigtened circumstances. There is nothing worse than having to live in somebody elses house, have them keep switching the boundaries and moan about things that I'm not able to moan about (eg. if I forget the washing up they will complain, but if they leave their plates in the sink for 3 days, its their house!), and then having to listen to them moan about how poor they are and expect sympathy from the one who can't even afford a house!

The limit against tax is about 375 pm.

What you say is pretry true most of the time. My girlfriend has a resident landlady, and had another before that and so did my ex. So I am/was the scruffy lout who came round and used their shower etc. It can be pretty difficult but some landlords are better than others.

My theory is that if I find a really messy house with a single bloke in it I should be laughing. The important thing is to get a room big enough to have your own tv, then you have your own space. I know it is not ideal but I have a gene for extreme tightness and cannot face paying council tax gas etc.

I know it would be no good for most but I dont have much stuff so can move from one place to the next in just one journey with a mates car and keep my address listed at my folks house.

I would get a bedsit and share with my girlfriend but she is not as stingy as me [and is a lot richer (STR)]

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I am sorry but this is the sort of self indulgence verging on mental instability that got britain in this fix in the first place. What they need is not more money but a bit of a serious reality check, and possibly to go bankrupt. They can't count. Their total outgoings are even more than they say they are (about 60 quid.) When in this sort of crisis the first thing to do if you need to get out of debt is cut back on unneccessary consumption. This is a "things mania".

  • They have 2 cars.

  • They have a television package worth 100 quid a month. That is not a neccessity.

  • They are contributing 10 quid to charity - which in itself is not a bad thing but not when you are unable to feed your self - at that point it is just self indulgence.

  • They are spending 70 quid a month on mobiles.

  • They are also paying for 3 televisions liscences at a variable rate? (1 house 1 liscence?)

  • They are paying 100 quid a month on energy bills - turn off the light when you walk out of the room.

  • Their insurance is over the top. They are spending around 240 quid a month just on insurance. They have very expensive morgage protection cover which could be reduced and both have life cover which while desirable with kids involved is not the first thing that you pay when you are in financial crisis and in a social welfare state. There home and contents insurance comes to 44. Not sure but it seems high.

  • They took out a second loan after the first consolidation loan (Having consolidated once last year they then added 10K worth of debt on top. So how did they end up building up more debt when they knew they were in trouble).

  • The only thing that seems low is the food bill.

They are probably sure that they NEED all these things. They don't. No doubt this family is in chaos in a number of ways and I am sure that things really are as bad as they say they are, but the sustainable solution is not effectively begging on the net. What they need is a reality check and possibly some psychological and practical support around various issues including their insurance mania. From my estimates they could knock 250 to 300 a month off the outgoings by systematic assessment of their "needs". Things would still be tight, but would be likely to be sustainable.

So what gives me the right to judge? Because they are publicly asking me to feel sorry for them.

Your absolutely right.

However, I disagree about the food bill. I think its extortionate.

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i also think they are being 'too picky' to expect more than 15% spare monthly income not taken up by loans.

Absolutely - these young whiners just want something for nothing. No understanding of sacrifice, that's the problem. In order to get their first mortgage my parents had a third child specifically in order to sell it to a pharmaceutical company for vivisection - everyone did it in their day but now - tsk - people don't know they're born.

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I'm in a genuine financial crisis too, I went to the dentist last night with a toothache, x-rays revealed a infection in the root caused by a small crack in the molar. After a Root canal and crown I'm £300 worse off and find mself in a position where I don't have enough money to last the month. ( a recent vets bill wiped out what money I had saved)

I'm already on a tight budget as it is with little to nothing left over each month but I don't expect some helpful soul to hand over money to me and bail me out.

I do my food shopping on a monthly basis, I've slashed my budget and will be eating noodles and pasta bake for the next 4 weeks (saved £30), I was supposed to travel up north to see my family at the end of febuary but I cancelled and got a refund on the tickets (£40 saved). I've already worked out that if I only get the bus half way home and walk the rest of the way I can save some money (£15 this month). If I don't use my mobile phone I can save £5 a week (£20 saved this month).

All that isn't enough to make ends meet but no one can say I'm not trying.

PS, it didn't hurt at all :-)

Edited by HomeAlone

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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