Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

One-percent

Is The Sea Becoming More Dangerous Or Are People Becoming More Stupid

Recommended Posts

People used to respect and even fear the sea. Now they want to do what they want to do. Not even the sea can stop them...erm, but, King Knut, didn't they do history??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was brought up in a fishing town, so did and still do respect the sea. The local tradition for fishermen is that they all wore gansey jumpers on the boats. Each family had its own pattern so that when the body of the drowned fishermen were retrieved, they would be able to at least identity the family.

It seems that this respect, or at least knowledge of the inherent dangers is somewhat lost.

Forgot to post in the original post the story from yesterday where the same couple were rescued three times in as many days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As above,

There have been a lot of deaths by drowning at the coastin the past week.

See

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-37152746

Where six people have drowned fron Cornwall to Scotland

AND

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-37178643

Today, another three.

Discuss

I think it is a couple of things

Many who visit the seaside for holidays do so because it's different to the land-locked place where they live, and so it is unfamiliar.

We are increasingly urban and so increasingly out of touch with nature and natural forces.

The sea is unpredictable and needs understanding, which you get from growing up with it, from watching it, and from near misses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People used to respect and even fear the sea. Now they want to do what they want to do. Not even the sea can stop them...erm, but, King Knut, didn't they do history??

This I think.

There are regular complaints from lifeguards (I was once one of these red-shorted ones) that a significant number of people no longer do as they are asked or take any notice of the red flag. They know better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People see the ocean simply as a playground. It's not. It has many moods and sudden hazards. Weather and wind can change in minutes. By the time some realise this, it's too late. The current fad for seeking personal 'challenges' - (bungee jumping; coasteering; 'tombstoning' etc.) - claims victims weekly

Respect the sea. It's dangerous. The water's cold.

Air/sea rescue, lifeboat and coastguard near me are out on calls every day, sometimes several times a day. I'm out on the water three days a week. Today I saw a small outboard-powered inflatable half a mile out with a woman and a five year old on it - neither with a lifejacket. One stumble - and that child was gone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 400 people drown annually in the UK, that's been a pretty steady pattern for the last 15 years and quite a lot down from 30 years ago.

Obviously hot weather is going to be a factor in this, since that is when you are likely to go into the sea and other outdoor water bodies, so it's not surprising to see a cluster of deaths at this time of year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This I think.

There are regular complaints from lifeguards (I was once one of these red-shorted ones) that a significant number of people no longer do as they are asked or take any notice of the red flag. They know better.

Were you in baywatch frank ;) (yay smiley)

Nail on head I think with the comment on they know better. Especially when someone has to be rescued three times from the oncoming tide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three rescues for one couple. Now, that's just stupidity. ?

They should charge the cost of the rescue for second and subsequent serial stupidity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 400 people drown annually in the UK, that's been a pretty steady pattern for the last 15 years and quite a lot down from 30 years ago.

Obviously hot weather is going to be a factor in this, since that is when you are likely to go into the sea and other outdoor water bodies, so it's not surprising to see a cluster of deaths at this time of year.

It was the grouping and so many close toghether and in similar ways (near the shore, either swept off rocks or in difficulty close th the beach) that got me thinking that something more significant was going on here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you in baywatch frank ;) (yay smiley)

Nail on head I think with the comment on they know better. Especially when someone has to be rescued three times from the oncoming tide.

Could a been B)

I heard a guy who trained with me all those years ago, made a career out of it and was heading up the Cornwall beach lifeguards, speaking on the radio about it. Retired now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to be lifeboat crew so I've always respected the sea. Bit scared sometimes, actually, but that doesn't go with the image.

More people are drowning because more people are learning to swim. If you can't swim you stay well away. If you've got a 50 metre swimming certificate then you'll drive 50 miles to leap into a watery playground ' cos it's your right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few days ago the Daily Mail had a big story online showing sea potatoes on the Cornish coast and holiday-makers - I decided to assume that they were all second-home owners from London - were horrified and wondering what these 'unidentified' creatures were.

So, to answer your question - idiots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three rescues for one couple. Now, that's just stupidity.

They should charge the cost of the rescue for second and subsequent serial stupidity.

I thought that at the time, there should be a charge on stupidity.

Here we go, it was a single woman, not a couple, so apologies for that.

http://travel.aol.co.uk/2016/08/22/rnli-rescue-same-woman-three-times-in-four-days-cornwall/

I remember years ago, the seasoned fishermen were moving their boats from the lower to upper harbour so as to protect their boats from the building storm. Meanwhile, a weekend sailor with a new yacht was heading out to sea. They shouted at them to turn back, but they kept going and did not make it out the harbour mouth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to be lifeboat crew so I've always respected the sea. Bit scared sometimes, actually, but that doesn't go with the image.

More people are drowning because more people are learning to swim. If you can't swim you stay well away. If you've got a 50 metre swimming certificate then you'll drive 50 miles to leap into a watery playground ' cos it's your right.

Respect justthisbloke! Yes, I can imagine it was scary at times and I don't feel it takes away from the image to be so. Stupid not to be.

Was it not thought unlucky if a crew member could actually swim, not in rnli terms, but for seafarers in general?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 400 people drown annually in the UK, that's been a pretty steady pattern for the last 15 years and quite a lot down from 30 years ago.

Obviously hot weather is going to be a factor in this, since that is when you are likely to go into the sea and other outdoor water bodies, so it's not surprising to see a cluster of deaths at this time of year.

You say that, and I agree, but.....I clearly recall only so many months ago when the TV news was reporting storms battering the coastline of Britain and there, in plain view of the cameras, were idiots venturing right up to the edge of various sea walls, etc almost asking to be swept away by the next big monster wave.....

So I say stupid has a lot to do with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BBC just reporting that a further 2 dead people have been pulled from the sea in Camber Sands, Kent and that a third is still missing.

What on earth happened? Rip tide? Strong current? People cut off by rising water? The Daily Mail is reporting the deaths as a possible jellyfish stinging cause.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the reason there were so many the other weekend was due to it being a spring tide and very windy conditions.

My father has a small boat on Anglesey, when I visited at the weekend he told me 6 boats had been taken off their moorings in the high winds they'd had. That was pretty unpresidented

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update.

The death toll at camber sands has risen to five.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-37178643

The report is ver wired. Something vague about fish, but they were not jellyfish.

Near the end, it reports that the increase is largely due to people from outside the area and entering the sea fully clothed

Bizarre and tragic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BBC just reporting that a further 2 dead people have been pulled from the sea in Camber Sands, Kent and that a third is still missing.

What on earth happened? Rip tide? Strong current? People cut off by rising water? The Daily Mail is reporting the deaths as a possible jellyfish stinging cause.

Calm as a millpond from the look of the pictures. It might have been a rip tide (remember a thread on how to survive these on here some time back). Don't know that coast though so can't really comment

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   94 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.