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spunko2010

Foraging And Scrumping - Anyone Do It?

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I've gradually started this over the last couple of years, ie taking food that's growing wild or sometimes basically pinching in small quanities. Does anyone here do it? Granted you'll probably need to live near to / in a rural area to do it well. This year so far I've foraged/scrumped/pinched cobnuts, blackberries, blackcurrants, bramley apples, plums, gooseberries, elderflower, strawberries. Not cost me a penny. Found a pear orchard the other day and biding my time.

BTW if you haven't tried kentish cobnuts there's only a small window of opportunity to get them, about 6 weeks.

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Day off today and when the tide has fully dropped and the sand's dried out a bit will be gathering sea beet and marsh samphire to go with the mackerel I caught for a fully foraged dinner.

I would love to say that I always eat like this but this will be the first one this year. Though hopefully not the last.

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I've never seen bilberries growing wild round here I don't think.

I did get some samphire back in June, much better than the salty Israeli stuff you get in the supermarket, which I assume from the taste grows in the Dead Sea :lol:

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Have not been cockling or shrimping for years but many do so around my way. Best done in the Spring and Autumn and not Summer months.

There are loads of mushrooms around the place but I just avoid for obvious reasons.

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I've never seen bilberries growing wild round here I don't think.

l:

Don't know where 'here' is, but moorland is the place. Totally different to blueberries, which look to be a larger version, but the taste is completely different. The poles like them so can be bought in polish shops in jars, but not really foraged then (and the bottling does something detrimental to the taste)

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Not much any more. Too many blackberries in the garden to need to go anywhere else for everyone's #1 Nature's Bounty. Though I do still collect, for example, wild garlic in its season.

Back when I had no money, it's how I lived. I was collecting blackberries not just around peak season (like, right now) when they're plentiful and good, but right into the second half of November of 2003 when the few stragglers are too shrivelled and tough even for the bugs. I daresay I'd do it again if my money were to run out and my disposable income were to fall back too far below the dollar-a-day line.

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I forage (does that include road kill) and scrump at least 75% of our food I reckon, well it equates to 5 main meals a week most of the year. But, yes you really do need to be rural and if you are rural and by the coast, it is easy to be very self sufficient to a very high standard, and it's also fresher than you could ever buy.

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Don't know where 'here' is, but moorland is the place. Totally different to blueberries, which look to be a larger version, but the taste is completely different. The poles like them so can be bought in polish shops in jars, but not really foraged then (and the bottling does something detrimental to the taste)

Many variants on blueberries, though I've never seen wild ones remotely near as big as supermarket ones.

Our local ones are called whortleberries. Delicious, but b***** hard work to gather in any quantity.

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I was walking up from a Gower beach last summer stuffing my face with bilberries and blackberries. A child in front wanted to eat one but her Mother told her that they would have to go to the supermarket to buy some. Clearly not a local parent.

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Only blackberries as a regular thing but I have dabbled with other things in the past; elder flower/berries, wild garlic, etc. My walks take me past fields full of sweetcorn, broccoli, rhubarb, etc. Lots of opportunities for gleaning. Not quite theft. I also know where there are wild (well, feral is probably a better term) apples and plums - but as I have these in my garden, I've not tried these.

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There are I believe wild cherries around here (in Kent) but I've never known what to do with them so haven't picked them, plus there are a lot of lookalikes that aren't edible.

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When I used to live in the UK - apples, Cherries, Blackberries, Sloes, Deer.....

That one's still on my hit list - well somebody else's. Been past a few but there's always been too much traffic to stop for the amount of time it would take to haul it into the car boot.

This time of year, if you know the routes they take, you can do very well collecting spuds spilled from trailers as the tractors take the bends too fast. I have been known to turn the car around to fill a sack with spuds :lol: Always keep your eyes peeled.

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Our local ones are called whortleberries. Delicious, but b***** hard work to gather in any quantity.

I think they're the same thing as bilberries. They usually only grow high up (by UK standards, perhaps 800' above sea level around here). There are some patches near me that I'll help myself to when passing at the right time of year, and I keep meaning to take a box along and try to fill it with enough to put in a pie, which will take ages.

There are some places near me with patches of raspberries growing along the roadside, and they're bloody delicious.

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Yes spunko.....

Starting in May with strawberries I can eat loganberries, blackcurrents, gooseberries, blackberries and apples until January.

So, that`s fresh fruit for most of the year....don`t need to buy from a supermarket. (supermarkets are for bacon and sausages)

I also grow a wall of Jerusalem Artichokes which grow faster than I can eat them.

Btw, I`m not a prepper nut. It just makes sense from a number of angles.

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Yes spunko.....

Starting in May with strawberries I can eat loganberries, blackcurrents, gooseberries, blackberries and apples until January.

So, that`s fresh fruit for most of the year....don`t need to buy from a supermarket. (supermarkets are for bacon and sausages)

I also grow a wall of Jerusalem Artichokes which grow faster than I can eat them.

Btw, I`m not a prepper nut. It just makes sense from a number of angles.

Nut and fruit trees and perennial vegetables (ie artichoke, rhubarb, asparagus, strawbs, raspberries etc) are my line of veg gardening as well. I do a little conventional veg gardening as well but it's a lot of faff.

Like you, I think having some grub growing in the garden "just makes sense".

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We usually get a good crop of damsens off our local heath but not this year. I pick and eat wild strawberrys and blackberrys and this thread has reminded me it is time to check out the lovely russet apples on a tree on public land nearby.

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