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London Hpi Impact: Commuter Cops, Emergency Deployment Issues

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Telegraph: Met terror warning as report reveals 'commuter cops' live as far away as Cornwall and the South of France

Link: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/08/18/met-terror-warning-as-report-reveals-commuter-cops-live-as-far-a/

The Metropolitan Police could struggle to mobilise officers during a terrorist incident because so many live outside the capital with some based as far afield as Cornwall and the South of France, a new report has warned.

Less than half of the Mets 18,000 borough officers now live in London, with soaring house prices giving rise to a phenomenon known as commuter cops.

According to a report by the Policy Exchange think tank, the trend could make it harder to deploy officers in a major emergency such as a terrorist attack or riot.

Edited by Fairyland

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Years ago they used to house cops in special housing as London has always been expensive. Afaik this was free or virtually free making it a nice little bonus

Yes, they did provide housing for police.

Then they sold it off for redevelopment.

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Same with doctors on call. They're supposed to be within 30 minutes of the hospital. Most I know push that to its utmost limit and some. In the next few years, unless something gives, they won't get the numbers to work in London. What's the capital come to when doctors can't afford to live there unless daddy already lives in the area? Shithole.

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Yes, they did provide housing for police.

Then they sold it off for redevelopment.

They also had housing for teachers in many London boroughs and housing on hospital grounds for medical staff, which afaik also all got sold off. Worked out well. Don't honestly know how they manage to recruit

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I remember the July bombings. Finished a late shift and was woke up by a phone call from work and endless sirens coming into London on motorway. They asked me to come straight in but not to take public transport. Within 30 minutes I was showered, dressed and in work by peddle cycle. Back then we had police section houses and police houses all over London. Now they are all gone, with the exception of 1 section house were you can only stay for a short period.

Pretty much all the officers who have got housing have moved out of London, lots with huge commutes. Lots have sleeping bags in lockers as so called cost cutting justifies officers doing shifts where they can't get home. Some of us rent in the capital but rents are going up so much faster than wages. We have years of wage freezes and the last 2 years we have had 1% pay rises they have been more than cancelled by nation insurance and pension contribution increases. As well as all the police accommodation being sold off to developers so are half the police stations. We are being completely being removed from the community and being replaced by luxury flats. Officers continue to leave the met for other forces where they can afford to live.

I signed up for the governments discount starter homes, they never materialised, instead they sent sent me hotel room buy to let deals. :( I just save year after year my deposit but it gets harder as rents rise faster than wages and I get little interest on my deposit.

Police, ambulance crews, doctors and nurses are going to continue to leave the capital unless something is done about prices and rents.

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This used to be london junior police officer accomodation - like a halls of residence. I know it as its now a hostel for travellers - I used a few years ago when new to working in london but living elsewhere in the UK.

http://www.abercornhousehostel.co.uk/

Walls made of paper and very sterile with tiles everywhere but otherwise a cheap, safe single room in central london.

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Don't know about police officers, but teachers and NHS staff used to get priority access to council accommodation didn't they? Presumably all gone. I've heard of fire service staff commuting in from Cardiff.

London is a very fragile city that seems becoming more so in terms of essential services and infrastructure.

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I remember the July bombings. Finished a late shift and was woke up by a phone call from work and endless sirens coming into London on motorway. They asked me to come straight in but not to take public transport. Within 30 minutes I was showered, dressed and in work by peddle cycle. Back then we had police section houses and police houses all over London. Now they are all gone, with the exception of 1 section house were you can only stay for a short period.

Pretty much all the officers who have got housing have moved out of London, lots with huge commutes. Lots have sleeping bags in lockers as so called cost cutting justifies officers doing shifts where they can't get home. Some of us rent in the capital but rents are going up so much faster than wages. We have years of wage freezes and the last 2 years we have had 1% pay rises they have been more than cancelled by nation insurance and pension contribution increases. As well as all the police accommodation being sold off to developers so are half the police stations. We are being completely being removed from the community and being replaced by luxury flats. Officers continue to leave the met for other forces where they can afford to live.

I signed up for the governments discount starter homes, they never materialised, instead they sent sent me hotel room buy to let deals. :( I just save year after year my deposit but it gets harder as rents rise faster than wages and I get little interest on my deposit.

Police, ambulance crews, doctors and nurses are going to continue to leave the capital unless something is done about prices and rents.

Good! I hope London is depleated of the people that make it work. Maybe then the government will take action on the insanity of housing.

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I remember the July bombings. Finished a late shift and was woke up by a phone call from work and endless sirens coming into London on motorway. They asked me to come straight in but not to take public transport. Within 30 minutes I was showered, dressed and in work by peddle cycle. Back then we had police section houses and police houses all over London. Now they are all gone, with the exception of 1 section house were you can only stay for a short period.

Pretty much all the officers who have got housing have moved out of London, lots with huge commutes. Lots have sleeping bags in lockers as so called cost cutting justifies officers doing shifts where they can't get home. Some of us rent in the capital but rents are going up so much faster than wages. We have years of wage freezes and the last 2 years we have had 1% pay rises they have been more than cancelled by nation insurance and pension contribution increases. As well as all the police accommodation being sold off to developers so are half the police stations. We are being completely being removed from the community and being replaced by luxury flats. Officers continue to leave the met for other forces where they can afford to live.

I signed up for the governments discount starter homes, they never materialised, instead they sent sent me hotel room buy to let deals. :( I just save year after year my deposit but it gets harder as rents rise faster than wages and I get little interest on my deposit.

Police, ambulance crews, doctors and nurses are going to continue to leave the capital unless something is done about prices and rents.

Meanwhile, being a police officer (or anyone in the public sector) out in the sticks has a great life. In Whitby for example, did not see one Bobby on the beat, but regularly saw them driving round in nice top of the range crimes. I guess there would be less chance of being shot or having to deal with potentially dangerous or nasty situations. Wages afaict are not much more in London, so why would anyone chose to do it?

This might be the end game for London when it can no longer service its public services

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Meanwhile, being a police officer (or anyone in the public sector) out in the sticks has a great life. In Whitby for example, did not see one Bobby on the beat, but regularly saw them driving round in nice top of the range crimes. I guess there would be less chance of being shot or having to deal with potentially dangerous or nasty situations. Wages afaict are not much more in London, so why would anyone chose to do it?

This might be the end game for London when it can no longer service its public services

I once read a magnificent post on the internet about this. It was before I came acrosss this site.

I haven't managed to find the post since, but I remeber it was very succint.

It whent something like this:

If London continues becoming more and more expensive, the people that make London London will leave. The artists, the student's, the EE who make the overpriced Latte's in Starbucks and Costa. The teachers and the Cops. The ambulance drivers and the nurses.

What good will it be for the super rich to have a a house in Zone 1 , when Zone 1 will be devoid of workers

That was the gist of it. This was back in 2012, when I was seing the bubble pick up speed again.

Back then I was worried about the prospects of the housing market.

The post accurately predicted many of the problems we've seen. Cops comuting from southern France, a lack of teachers in London due to housing. News reports of private sector comapnies in London struggling to recruit. etc

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Another family leaves the capital. (Okay, this was Gordon Brown, back in 2010.) Image: Getty.

For a certain type of British university graduate, moving to London is a rite of passage. If you aren’t qualified for a job that your granddad might recognise, be that lawyer, teacher or doctor, then your best hope for starting a career has long been the Big Smoke.

The internal UK migration figures collected by the Office for National Statistics bear this out, with more than 100,000 20-somethings descending on the capital each year.

But this is the only age group where arrivals to London outnumber the leavers. Once Londoners hit 30, they are more likely to move out of London than move into it – typically because they need space for their kids to run around in.

This is a trend as old as time. But in the past two years, something dramatic has happened: net emigration among 30-somethings has leapt by 25 per cent. In what is presumably not a coincidence, the same trend is visible among the under 10s.

What could explain this? Well, between 2012 and 2014, London’s house prices rose by 29 per cent, and rents by 6 per cent. In the rest of Britain over the same period, house prices rose 9 per cent and rents 2 per cent.

This accelerating exodus is the latest evidence that the housing crisis is starting to infect the wider economy.

London’s delights are well-documented: the parks, the public transport, the schools; the restaurants, pubs, museums, and theatres; the general excitement, the sense that anything is possible. And for many of us all our friends and family are here.

Yet it’s becoming harder to appreciate any of this – because, once your rent goes out, we have little left to spend on actually enjoying London.

[[[That's the problem when people are spending more and more on rent/mortgages as a proportion of their income - less is spent on other stuff. - canbuywontbuy]]MY INSERT]

And if you’re preparing to move flat because, yet again, you picked a landlord who only cares about maximising his rent, or have given up on saving a deposit for a home whose value is rising faster than you earn money, you start to wonder if it’s worth being here at all.

It’s still a huge decision to up sticks, cut your social ties and take a chance on a different job market. Indeed, the ONS tells us that 64 per cent of London’s émigrés move to the South East or East of England regions, which are largely commutable for London workers.

But more than a third – nearly 100,000 people – are leaving for other parts of the UK. Some aren’t even making that decision, with councils relocating homeless families to cheaper parts of the country.

migrationgraph_2.png?itok=BsPURiaN

Migration to London by age group. Image: Generation Rent/ONS.

There are winners in this flight from London. The north should benefit from an influx of skilled workers, and those workers will be able to spend more of their earnings on things other than their landlord.

But for London, the result is a disaster. Communities lose neighbours, support networks are eroded and employers will have a harder time attracting talent. Teachers and doctors will generally find it easier to find work elsewhere, which puts greater pressure on schools and healthcare in the capital.

And because any given job pays more in London than elsewhere in the country, those shunned by the capital’s housing market will be getting by on a lower salary, paying less in income tax. The whole UK economy thus depends on London being affordable.

London’s success is built not only on its rite of passage for graduates, but the idea that incomers and native Londoners alike can build a life here. For now, 20-somethings continue to flock to London; but if their numbers start to drop, the city’s creative energy and, in turn, its wider appeal will decline.

The next London mayor’s job will be to stanch the outflow of families by throwing everything they can at bringing down housing costs. If they fail to do this, they’ll find that London’s success is all too fragile.

Dan Wilson Craw is policy and communications manager at the Generation Rent. The campaign group is comparing Mayoral candidates’ housing policies here.

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For those here who like to rip on millenials, read this thread:

https://www.reddit.com/r/london/comments/42mxi0/london_is_too_expensive_for_creative_workers_and/

The other thing running through that thread is how badly some employers in London treat staff. From own, albeit anecdotal experience, workers are expected to work harder in London that in rural areas. It's not called the rat race for nothing.

Afaict the only thing keeping London afloat is the kids born in London who are able to live at home and don't know any different. I can't see how the massive move of young people to London is sustainable

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The other thing running through that thread is how badly some employers in London treat staff. From own, albeit anecdotal experience, workers are expected to work harder in London that in rural areas. It's not called the rat race for nothing.

Afaict the only thing keeping London afloat is the kids born in London who are able to live at home and don't know any different. I can't see how the massive move of young people to London is sustainable

It's why we have migration, London can press the worlds poor to work and live in appalling conditions. TPTB have used it to cover this for decades. People used to come in from the outer provinces of Britain then Europe and now the rest of the world.

However with a more connected world it's going to become harder to find London's discounted workforce but we're not quite there yet.

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Sorry this may be a naive question, aren't cops entitled to tax credits/HB if they don't earn enough to live in London? Or, do they earn just above the threshold?

Edited by Fairyland

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The other thing running through that thread is how badly some employers in London treat staff. From own, albeit anecdotal experience, workers are expected to work harder in London that in rural areas. It's not called the rat race for nothing.

Afaict the only thing keeping London afloat is the kids born in London who are able to live at home and don't know any different. I can't see how the massive move of young people to London is sustainable

My wife was one of those over exploited workers.

Whilst I worked in the midlands earning 40% more than her with one years less experience in my field than hers, she was semi expected to put in long ours for no extra pay just because .... muh career.

I don't subscribe to that BS. I am paid for X hours and maybe if the job requires an extra push. That's it. For her the "deadlines" had to be done, yes or yes. Her wages and career progression where more frozen than walt disney. What a joke.

Afer one year living with me up here, she's started to apreciate that life is not only a career.

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Sorry this may be a naive question, aren't cops entitled to tax credits/HB if they don't earn enough to live in London? Or, do they earn just above the threshold?

Only if they have kids and then the benefit gravy train really kicks in. Young, single not so much

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My wife was one of those over exploited workers.

Whilst I worked in the midlands earning 40% more than her with one years less experience in my field than hers, she was semi expected to put in long ours for no extra pay just because .... muh career.

I don't subscribe to that BS. I am paid for X hours and maybe if the job requires an extra push. That's it. For her the "deadlines" had to be done, yes or yes. Her wages and career progression where more frozen than walt disney. What a joke.

Afer one year living with me up here, she's started to apreciate that life is not only a career.

And then the tool that falls for this bs undermines everyone else's position until it becomes the norm

I'm currently being instructed by my trade union to work Ro rule due to industrial action. The management STILL expect people to not take full leave entitlement and to work above and beyond. Yet people still do. Own worse enemies. It's almost as if the worker drones in londinstan have been completely brainwashed

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Yes, they did provide housing for police.

Then they sold it off for redevelopment.

There used to be a police house in the village next to the post office opposite the pub when I grew up.

There are two houses near me now which are called 'police houses' by the oldies.

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And then the tool that falls for this bs undermines everyone else's position until it becomes the norm

I'm currently being instructed by my trade union to work Ro rule due to industrial action. The management STILL expect people to not take full leave entitlement and to work above and beyond. Yet people still do. Own worse enemies. It's almost as if the worker drones in londinstan have been completely brainwashed

Yes, it's ******ing ridiculous. I understand there are some big projects that sometimes require an extra push. But this should be the exception and not the rule. I think the education system has brainwashed an entire generation.

I might be wrong, but there a lot of tv programmes where there are employees putting extra hours for free for a promotion, and these people are portrayed as "succefull". Disgusting

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Yes, it's ******ing ridiculous. I understand there are some big projects that sometimes require an extra push. But this should be the exception and not the rule. I think the education system has brainwashed an entire generation.

I might be wrong, but there a lot of tv programmes where there are employees putting extra hours for free for a promotion, and these people are portrayed as "succefull". Disgusting

The really sad part is that people fall for it. Remember an old saying that on their deathbed, no one wished they had spent more time at the office.

There is a word for this behaviour 'performativity'

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There used to be a police house in the village next to the post office opposite the pub when I grew up.

There are two houses near me now which are called 'police houses' by the oldies.

. I must be one of the oldies as I remember the local bobbies living in a house which kind of also served as the local police station

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