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50% Of Graduates Living With Parents

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Yeah, not much demand for Surf Scientists or Geology students in this banana republic

The mystery is why we need scientists and geologists to shift parcels at Amazon. Well I do, it's a job creation scheme for University towns, a boon for BTL and a rite of passage for the students. Not surprising that the towns not on the public sector gravy train like Mansfield, Burnley and Blackpool kicked the shit out of the government at the Brexit vote. How dare they pour all their money into the parasites of Cambridge.

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The mystery is why we need scientists and geologists to shift parcels at Amazon. Well I do, it's a job creation scheme for University towns, a boon for BTL and a rite of passage for the students. Not surprising that the towns not on the public sector gravy train like Mansfield, Burnley and Blackpool kicked the shit out of the government at the Brexit vote. How dare they pour all their money into the parasites of Cambridge.

Got to get skills for the knowledge economy which doesn't exist.

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Got to get skills for the knowledge economy which doesn't exist.

Well I guess the students buy into it too. Whilst sudying they are signed up members of the Establishment ( look at the demographics of the Remain vote) and believe Carousel will lead to renewal. In their third or fourth year the red light goes out, all go off to Carousel on graduation day and the outcome may not be what they expected..

Edited by crashmonitor

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They just need more government help so they can buy a house. Not!

What future is there for a graduate in the UK anyway. I get the impression many voted remain because they wanted to leave - the UK!

Might as well be on the dole in a warmer climate with cheaper housing.

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'On the day before sixth-formers discover if they have the A-level grades to win their dream university place, half the graduates surveyed said their degree was not worth the vast sums of money they paid for it.'

I have to say, my anecdotal observations tally with that.

I graduated in the early 90s and got a job (way away from where I come from).

Of the people form my village, a few years either side - so graduating late 89 to 95 - so, pre-full on fees.

I say less than half have graduate level type jobs, or a least well paying ones.

Of those, I guess some did not need to go to Uni full-time i.e. a part time study + work might have been better.

People banging on about graduates 'earn loads over their working life' are grasping at stats of a very few people who graduated in the late 60s/early 70s. These people pre-date even the red brick unis never mind the ex polys.

There's already stats showing people who studied arts + humanities earn less than people who left school at 16.

Its wrong that the risk/price of failing to get a good job falls on the student. It needs to fall on both UKGOV and the HE establishment. Maybe then theyd stop lying about $$$$$ from a degree. There needs to be some sort of feedback o Uni funding and the number of its grads who go and get wellpaying jobs.

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They just need more government help so they can buy a house. Not!

What future is there for a graduate in the UK anyway. I get the impression many voted remain because they wanted to leave - the UK!

Might as well be on the dole in a warmer climate with cheaper housing.

There's no warm countries that offer non-time limited dole like the UK.

No cold ones either.

Christ, even Spaniards who are the most reluctant to move anywhere, have discovered the uK tax credits + HB culture.

Thats one of the big problems with the UK - too much tax distributed to the non-working.

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The issue is TINA for many young people. The industrial base has been hollowed out, so no well paid jobs in engineering or factories. Low paid work (as discussed on another thread today) has not kept pace with inflation and is largely been done by EU and other citizens, undercutting wages further. So a young person reaches school leaving age. What to do? There are no decent jobs straigh from school, so might as well try HE and things may have picked up.

Successive governments have torn up the social contract and people are just beginning to wake up to this - bar those on here who realised this a long time ago

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A recently graduated person I know with a first job, not well paid and boyfriend also working, not well paid just got given a council flat and the girl is not pregnant....that is a first for me......I thought that only happened 30 years ago..... ;)

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Not a grad but living with Folks, i flat refuse to pay 12 x my salary for a 3 bed box that my parents generations paid 3 x theirs for.

Don't blame you. Just don't play the game and have as many holidays as possible :)

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The whole education and job market is a total mess and a farce. All we've done is award the bankers another mortgage against us as people....to get the same jobs our parents did without degrees. In addition to that there are so many professional associations and in-work training courses you have to keep up with just to stay "invested" in your career. Most of them teach you nothing more than how to tie your shoelaces but it is the piece of paper you need.

I am currently having a poke around at stuff (see what exists north of the M25), it is amazing to see how many BS "tickets" you need to just get an interview. In a way it protects my occupation from competition (I can't imagine many people have jumped thorugh so many of these ridiculous hoops) but at the same time you have to keep pace with this nonsense - we're just complicating what used to be provided by training and development on the job... a dirty concept for most employers. The whole affair is really disenfranchising, personally I feel locked into a professional strait-jacket now, I can't imagine having to start over in another new career knowing how many worthless ticks you have put into HR's boxes.

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Yeah, not much demand for Surf Scientists or Geology students in this banana republic

Perhaps we could create 10 new roles for Surf Scientists vacancies at each seaside town.

After liaising with the Met office, going out and taking wind measurements with their anemometers, and testing the water quality, they put out a PR statement like "today will be GOOD for surfing," or today will be BAD for surfing" etc.

There will also be a R&D department, where they can try out new surf boards, and post their findings on Youtube. They will have a like page, twitter, and local website. They will have their own IT team too.

Cowabunga!

Edited by 200p

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Sounds like success in the policy of ever more graduates.

When it was 5% of 18-year-olds going to university, it was a get-up-and-go demographic. You got up and went where you could find a job, which for most meant living with parents wasn't an option.

At 50%, the demographic is obviously much expanded.

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I am going to add to the debate the fact that graduate salaries today are not far off in nominal terms what they were when I graduated 20 years ago. That said, this might be a bit of a misleading statement as I suspect the scope/definition of what is considered a graduate job and therefore graduate salary has widened significantly over that time period. But irrespective of that, it does show that for a large proportion of graduates University will prove to be a waste of money.

I do wonder if we don't need to reverse some of the changes made by John Major's Government. Before that reform, we had Universities and Polytechnics and the latter focused on more vocational skills and perhaps catered for a more local demographic and delivered many shorter courses which also kept costs down.

Now everyone seems to want the full University Experience, but I am not convinced that is right for everyone given the poor rewards in many cases.

I won't knock Universities as a concept, and indeed the old system served me well, but by diluting the concept so that more can attend what was a fairly elitist system has had some very negative consequences.

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I am going to add to the debate the fact that graduate salaries today are not far off in nominal terms what they were when I graduated 20 years ago. That said, this might be a bit of a misleading statement as I suspect the scope/definition of what is considered a graduate job and therefore graduate salary has widened significantly over that time period. But irrespective of that, it does show that for a large proportion of graduates University will prove to be a waste of money.

I do wonder if we don't need to reverse some of the changes made by John Major's Government. Before that reform, we had Universities and Polytechnics and the latter focused on more vocational skills and perhaps catered for a more local demographic and delivered many shorter courses which also kept costs down.

Now everyone seems to want the full University Experience, but I am not convinced that is right for everyone given the poor rewards in many cases.

I won't knock Universities as a concept, and indeed the old system served me well, but by diluting the concept so that more can attend what was a fairly elitist system has had some very negative consequences.

The rot started before that with YTS instead of properly funded apprenticeships. These created a platform for social mobility, I have met many a VP, Managing Director, Board Director or successful mid sized business owner who was a BT, Post Office, Ford , Lucas etc apprentice who competed with and in many cases beat the traditional middle class degree entrant to a senior position

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Sounds like success in the policy of ever more graduates.

When it was 5% of 18-year-olds going to university, it was a get-up-and-go demographic. You got up and went where you could find a job, which for most meant living with parents wasn't an option.

At 50%, the demographic is obviously much expanded.

Thats true.

You only have acouple of years after you graduate to use your degree. P1ssing around for 5 years and it will not have been worth going.

Al degree is a start not an end in itself.

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There's no warm countries that offer non-time limited dole like the UK.

No cold ones either.

Christ, even Spaniards who are the most reluctant to move anywhere, have discovered the uK tax credits + HB culture.

Thats one of the big problems with the UK - too much tax distributed to the non-working.

Very true, I know Spaniards who have been on benefits for almost 20 years in the UK. Of course if the pro EU politicians had been intelligent they would have realized that 2 so different systems cannot be married.

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Very true, I know Spaniards who have been on benefits for almost 20 years in the UK. Of course if the pro EU politicians had been intelligent they would have realized that 2 so different systems cannot be married.

EU rules say a spaniard who has been legally in Blighty for five years can become a permanent resident and get all the benefits a Brit could.

That's five years when they must have been working and contributing. Unless of course our own UK system is so screwed up as to get in the way of the basic EU principle.

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Well I guess the students buy into it too. Whilst sudying they are signed up members of the Establishment ( look at the demographics of the Remain vote) and believe Carousel will lead to renewal. In their third or fourth year the red light goes out, all go off to Carousel on graduation day and the outcome may not be what they expected..

It was probably still true in my day, but these days I can't believe that anyone thinks that going to university equates to being on the fast train to a good job/career in light of the way that the higher level eduction system has developed (massively monetised) over the last few decades. Ever more students, ever lower standards for entry, ever higher fees, removal of student grants and a degree at the end of it which has been devalued through pumping massive numbers of people through the system.

The typical student faces coming out with little prospects of a well paid job in the near-mid term and an almost guaranteed mountain of personal debt (i.e. Student loan) which is not even dischargeable through bankruptcy.

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EU rules say a spaniard who has been legally in Blighty for five years can become a permanent resident and get all the benefits a Brit could.

That's five years when they must have been working and contributing. Unless of course our own UK system is so screwed up as to get in the way of the basic EU principle.

5 years? I know someone who did it within 2 weeks.

To be fair to the EU, I think our system is probably the problem.

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It was probably still true in my day, but these days I can't believe that anyone thinks that going to university equates to being on the fast train to a good job/career in light of the way that the higher level eduction system has developed (massively monetised) over the last few decades. Ever more students, ever lower standards for entry, ever higher fees, removal of student grants and a degree at the end of it which has been devalued through pumping massive numbers of people through the system.

The typical student faces coming out with little prospects of a well paid job in the near-mid term and an almost guaranteed mountain of personal debt (i.e. Student loan) which is not even dischargeable through bankruptcy.

You are only as good as your last gig.

So a degree is good at getting you into your first job and reassuring an employer that you have the fundamentals.

Ultimately though, if you are building a career, your degree has given you an in, but you then need to work your tits off in your first job to build up your skills.

2 or 3 years later, you can then start moving up - the harder you work in your first couple of jobs (particularly the first 5 years) at building your core skillset, the more 'chips' you will have to cash in later in your career.

In my experience, that's how it works in the IT world anywho - and most graduates I meet (which is not tonnes, but a few) tend to know this coming out of uni. (and if they don't, I'll drum it into them :-)

The big problem I see - is that even if a graduate builds an amazing career and does really well (50k to 80k basic) then they still will have little hope of getting on the housing ladder in the SE without some kind of inheritance or 'marrying well'; so what encouragement are we giving graduates to bother with all this.

(example in point, older sibling comes back from Uni to live with parents as cannot afford any better - what encouragement does that give younger sibling to bother with uni?)

I stand firm that having a career and a marketable sklilset is the best thing you can ever invest in, but I can see why people might start not bothering given the debt and silly house prices involved. Hence my fear that unless we have a HPC, it feels a bit like we are letting BTLers and Property 'Mad Gainz' asset strip our next generation and ultimately our entire economy.

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I think all the graduates who manage to get their toes in the door of a good firm in an area where they have no possibility of ever buying a family home of their own should move after a couple of years experience and renting at high cost to another more accommodating area and make a better life for themselves and family.....some places are no longer interested in the people that work and put effort in.....take,take,take. ;)

Edited by winkie

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/tuition-fees-student-debt-9000-nus-damning-study-a7194351.html

No stats on what the previous figures were before the increase in fees but looks like the higher education bubble is facing a backlash.

..this figure will increase as more degrees switch to online ...the old bricks and mortar unis belong in the 14th century ..these shackles have gone....move on .... :rolleyes:

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You are only as good as your last gig.

Some of my best hires have been people who previously had a good track record but ended up in the wrong job before I took them on. They're happy to be back doing something that suits their skills.

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