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Airbnb "making It Impossible To Find A Home"

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If you're lucky/unlucky to live in a tourist town, this may be why you cannot find affordable accommodation

http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20160811-is-airbnb-making-it-impossible-to-find-a-house

Hardly any publicly listed apartments met Herring’s needs, and in the end, he found somewhere through a business colleague. Still, Herring understands the allure of home sharing sites. “If landlords need money, they will turn to Airbnb,” he says. “They can make in two days on Airbnb what I paid in a month.”

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Airbnb is becoming a bit like bookingdotcom for house and room rentals...

The marketing plan relies upon ever increasing properties being added and they are not fussy who they take..... They rely upon their customers own review system to score on them providing some sort of feedback. Some even criticize the fact that the platform allowed them on in the first place like they have some sort of vetting procedure.

It's just another way to moneytize pay per click advertising... They pay good money to be top of those paid listings.

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I used AirBnB twice, and had a great experience both times. First was a 2BR flat in east London for about £50/night. It was clean and tidy if lacking a bit of polish decor wise. The second was a cabin or shed not far from the River Lea for similar price. That was nearly as good as the best hotel rooms I've stayed in, and surrounded by trees etc. Felt like I wasn't in London at all.

Friendly responsive hosts both and I had it confirmed within an hour without having to jump through hoops/explain what I was doing.

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Like everything - once everyone does it - already too late.

Had a look yesterday at Edinburgh for next weekend - middle of festival - the very peak of the peak time of year. 340 available. When looking at a few of their calenders - you can see mist have few or no bookings for the next month.

My Pal and his burd planned to do it with their flat for the festival. Zero interest.

To say it's a saturated market in Edinburgh us an understatement.

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Stepson and partner have flat in London with spare room and did Airbnb - all well and good profit till...guest was Christian evalngelical, he is gay and when it was obvious that he was sharing the other room with his boyfriend it all got very unpleasant

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Isn't there a gay airbnb version? I smell a gap in the market.

I refuse to use it because the name really pisses me off. Shouldn't it be airb&b?

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Airbnb is just a simple way to moneytize listings on the internet.

A popular website and the ability to organise well is all that is needed. Putting renters in contact with those prepared to rent to them.

Another startup idea to make money for not doing very much..

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37076706

Edited by geezer466

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Kept hearing about this Deliveroo thing. Another fast food to your door service, people must eat even more shite than I imagined for that to be making millions.

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guest was Christian evalngelical, he is gay and when it was obvious that he was sharing the other room with his boyfriend it all got very unpleasant

Christian evangelical and gay? How is that possible?

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Kept hearing about this Deliveroo thing. Another fast food to your door service, people must eat even more shite than I imagined for that to be making millions.

Younger brother looked into it as a part time job while studying. The sums just didn't add up because all the risk and expense is piled on the deliverer.

You need to buy your own bike and all the gear, pay your own insurance and other costs. The delivery rates were so low that you'd be often operating below minimum wage in what is a very hazardous job.

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Deliveroo has been in the news over the past few days for trying to impose a new pay structure on their couriers.

Basically they want to move from a guaranteed £7/hour + £1 per delivery to a flat rate £3.50 per delivery. All of the risk would therefore be on the courier

Understandably the couriers have said b******* to that and have decided to strike.

The fundamental problem with the hipster "sharing" economy (AirBnB / Uber / Deliveroo) is that they exploit assets which they either do not pay for or massively underpay for - leaving others to take all the risk. There is nothing caring or friendly about them.

Their practices would make a Victorian work house owner blush

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Deliveroo has been in the news over the past few days for trying to impose a new pay structure on their couriers.

Basically they want to move from a guaranteed £7/hour + £1 per delivery to a flat rate £3.50 per delivery. All of the risk would therefore be on the courier

Understandably the couriers have said b******* to that and have decided to strike.

The fundamental problem with the hipster "sharing" economy (AirBnB / Uber / Deliveroo) is that they exploit assets which they either do not pay for or massively underpay for - leaving others to take all the risk. There is nothing caring or friendly about them.

Their practices would make a Victorian work house owner blush

The world of work seems to becoming more & more Dickensian, how much longer until child labour reappears??

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Deliveroo has been in the news over the past few days for trying to impose a new pay structure on their couriers.

Basically they want to move from a guaranteed £7/hour + £1 per delivery to a flat rate £3.50 per delivery. All of the risk would therefore be on the courier

Understandably the couriers have said b******* to that and have decided to strike.

The fundamental problem with the hipster "sharing" economy (AirBnB / Uber / Deliveroo) is that they exploit assets which they either do not pay for or massively underpay for - leaving others to take all the risk. There is nothing caring or friendly about them.

Their practices would make a Victorian work house owner blush

Getting even harder to make any money via long hours and hard work or even brains/qualifications.....majority of the money nowadays is going backwards into past days and seems to be made from existing and inherited wealth and contacts/nepotism.... ;)

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The sad fact is that child labour will probably be the new way to start saving for a deposit the way things are going - or maybe a 2 x adult & 2 x child mortgage......

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Channel 4 had a programme on this last night. Actually pretty interesting.

One bloke has been scraping data to make available for the public. I think the website below is his - if not it's someone else doing similar. Have a scan for your area. You may have to use the get the data option then find your city then select see data visually.

Edinburgh has over 6000 listings.

I searched and found a recent Edinburgh city council report on the hotel/accommodation trade.

Including serviced apartments and all other type of accommodation - it has about 21,000 rooms.

No wonder my Pal had zero interest even during festival time.

Filtering on the below on his rather small area gives me 74 listings. 35 of them entire lets.

As I said previously - hugely saturated market.

http://insideairbnb.com/edinburgh/#

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London has about 42,000 listings.

Quick calculation based on population - I make that Edinburgh has THREE times the number of listings as London.

Wow.

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Channel 4 had a programme on this last night. Actually pretty interesting.

Before watching this I was unaware how airbnb was contributing to a worsening housing crisis. I was rather angry about it after watching it. Felt very sorry for the chap, whose father's flat was trashed by partygoers and the residents in the block of flats in Soho.

Council flats being sublet via airbnb. That really takes the p1ss! Tenants caught doing that ought to be the fined the income made on the property and then blacklisted from any social housing from any landlord for the rest of their lives.

Kudos to Housing Activist Murray Cox for his 'Inside airbnb' website and research.

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I think that blaming AirBnB for the housing crisis is missing the point.

And is there much thought put into the fact that investors in London and other cities are buying properties and either keeping them empty or only using them a few weeks a year?

The AirBnB market is over-saturated anyway. I was looking at going to Edinburgh during the festival this year - last minute booking. You had a choice of hundreds of flats (and some even at non-stupid prices).

Last year it was slimmer pickings.

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