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Do You Like Vegetables ?

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Following on Frank's topic re. fruit. Because I have this sneaking suspicion that Brits don't by and large, where as my wife and I most definitely do.

Just a few observations, yesterday we were at a BBQ and of the 25 or so guests we were the only ones that actually touched anything green. Meanwhile we went light on the meat, well just chicken in my case as I am generally a veggie. The meat was meanwhile being fought over, how the hell you go to the toilet on a solid meat diet God only knows.

Same again at the restaurant today, a pretty unchallenging tray of carrots, peas and cauli sent back untouched at most tables by the pensioners on the other tables...God knows how they are supposed to have lived through the waste not want not era. And really they should be hungry if you are going to blow £25 on a meal, no excuses....don't have a breakfast if necessary. I guess it's tough trying to spend the triple lock and waste just comes with the territory, period. Bloody hell I even eat the lemon rind.

My theory, all this veg bought at the supermarkets ends up in the bin by well intentioned people trying to be healthy and the fullest bins will be the ones of pensioner households.

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I have just picked: tomatoes (2 types), courgette, cucumber, runner beans and brocolli off my allotment.

I think me and the lad are having nachos with an assortment of vegetables and him indoors will have some runner beans with something.

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I'll wait for someone else to tell you that tomatoes are a fruit.

Don't look at me. I'm waiting for someone else to tell SB that cucumbers and courgettes are fruits.

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I'll wait for someone else to tell you that tomatoes are a fruit.

Well cucumbe, courgette and string beans are both fruit also, so one out of 5.

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Well cucumbe, courgette and string beans are both fruit also, so one out of 5.

Well they generally go with savoury dishes, and I reckon this is where Brits are skipping the balanced meal. I think may be the veg and (fruit) gets bought all well intentioned. But judging by the behaviour of folk when they eat out, does it actually get eaten.

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I've had to get to like them - I'm learning to cook and I'm not up to doing two menus to accommodate omnivorous me and vegetarian Mrs JTB.

Unlike meat, they *need* to be seasoned, spiced, dressed, or caramelised to be delicious. A spud is just a spud. But mash it, season it, butter it, and mush in some Dijon mustard and it's ambrosia.

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I've had to get to like them - I'm learning to cook and I'm not up to doing two menus to accommodate omnivorous me and vegetarian Mrs JTB.

Unlike meat, they *need* to be seasoned, spiced, dressed, or caramelised to be delicious. A spud is just a spud. But mash it, season it, butter it, and mush in some Dijon mustard and it's ambrosia.

A spud is not just a spud, you heathen. There are a massive number of varieties with different tastes and textures.

That said, grilling is the way to ignite people's enthusiasm for veggies. Egg plant grilled is wonderful.

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I've had to get to like them - I'm learning to cook and I'm not up to doing two menus to accommodate omnivorous me and vegetarian Mrs JTB.

Unlike meat, they *need* to be seasoned, spiced, dressed, or caramelised to be delicious. A spud is just a spud. But mash it, season it, butter it, and mush in some Dijon mustard and it's ambrosia.

I think meat needs to be caramelised or whatever too, it just that it seems to be a more natural part of the cooking process. Roast vegetables are just as delicious as meat, but take more effort. I've started (very occasionally) driking tomato juice which was a it of a psychological hurdle. I also snack quite a lot on carrots.

It's weird that are natural survival instincts don't drive us to eat vegetables in the same way as we desire meat/sugar/fat. (for most of us)

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Following on Frank's topic re. fruit. Because I have this sneaking suspicion that Brits don't by and large, where as my wife and I most definitely do.

Just a few observations, yesterday we were at a BBQ and of the 25 or so guests we were the only ones that actually touched anything green. Meanwhile we went light on the meat, well just chicken in my case as I am generally a veggie. The meat was meanwhile being fought over, how the hell you go to the toilet on a solid meat diet God only knows.

Same again at the restaurant today, a pretty unchallenging tray of carrots, peas and cauli sent back untouched at most tables by the pensioners on the other tables...God knows how they are supposed to have lived through the waste not want not era. And really they should be hungry if you are going to blow £25 on a meal, no excuses....don't have a breakfast if necessary. I guess it's tough trying to spend the triple lock and waste just comes with the territory, period. Bloody hell I even eat the lemon rind.

My theory, all this veg bought at the supermarkets ends up in the bin by well intentioned people trying to be healthy and the fullest bins will be the ones of pensioner households.

I think there is some food type expansion watershed in the UK. Tastes tend to be developed in childhood. If you are fed a variety of stuff then then you will like it and probably be more willing to try it as you get older. I think maybe past 1980 there was a big change in the types and varieties and quality of foods on offer in the UK. Before then to a lot of people veg was just some overcooked slop that was put on the side of your plate to sustain you because there wasn't enough meat available.

People maybe over the age of 70 were bought up in the late 40s/50s where rationing was still in effect and vegetables were very bland and were not cooked creativity. Although it's by no means universal, I think there are a lot of older people who have very unsophisticated tastes and are stubborn enough to stay that way without trying any new stuff or demanding higher quality (price is everything, value is nothing). Overcooked tasteless veg, meat charred to within an inch of its life etc. To be balanced, younger people have probably had far more opportunity to develop more varied tastes, and since maybe the mid 80s the quality of food available in this country has improved hugely.

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You can survive and be very healthy on a diet of meat only. The vilification of meat comes from misanthropic militant ecomentalists and vegans having too much input into public health advice.

That being said I like vegetables and eat them daily in large quantities. The killer in the Western diet is processed food containing massive amounts of sugar, vegetable oils and carbohydrates. It is utter poison. If I didn't know better I'd think someone was trying to kill us off.

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A spud is not just a spud, you heathen. There are a massive number of varieties with different tastes and textures.

That said, grilling is the way to ignite people's enthusiasm for veggies. Egg plant grilled is wonderful.

I did say I'm new to this cooking lark! Until six months ago, I'd barely darkened the door of a kitchen.

Of course, you're right - a spud is not just a spud. But any variety of spud is vastly enlivened when it's more than just boiled or baked.

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Unlike meat, they *need* to be seasoned, spiced, dressed, or caramelised to be delicious. A spud is just a spud. But mash it, season it, butter it, and mush in some Dijon mustard and it's ambrosia.

I'm thnking you might be getting most of your veg from the supermarket. A runner bean (oaky, strictly it's fruit) from a supermarket is a sorry thing. Straight off the vine however, they are damn tasty even raw, no tarting necessary.

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I think there is some food type expansion watershed in the UK. Tastes tend to be developed in childhood. If you are fed a variety of stuff then then you will like it and probably be more willing to try it as you get older. I think maybe past 1980 there was a big change in the types and varieties and quality of foods on offer in the UK. Before then to a lot of people veg was just some overcooked slop that was put on the side of your plate to sustain you because there wasn't enough meat available.

People maybe over the age of 70 were bought up in the late 40s/50s where rationing was still in effect and vegetables were very bland and were not cooked creativity. Although it's by no means universal, I think there are a lot of older people who have very unsophisticated tastes and are stubborn enough to stay that way without trying any new stuff or demanding higher quality (price is everything, value is nothing). Overcooked tasteless veg, meat charred to within an inch of its life etc. To be balanced, younger people have probably had far more opportunity to develop more varied tastes, and since maybe the mid 80s the quality of food available in this country has improved hugely.

I think there's a lot of truth to this. I grew up hating vegetables, I don't think I ate a green vegetable at all between the ages of 11 and 35. My wife is an excellent cook and has slowly converted me, to the point where I'm more excited by the accompanying salads than the BBQ meat.

I think there may be something else to it though. I have two sons brought up on the same meals, one prefers vegetables and tends to leave the meat, one would only ever eat meat/fish if given the choice.

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I did say I'm new to this cooking lark! Until six months ago, I'd barely darkened the door of a kitchen.

Of course, you're right - a spud is not just a spud. But any variety of spud is vastly enlivened when it's more than just boiled or baked.

I disagree. Get some decent Jersey Royals and just boil / steam them. Nothing fancy at all.

I love my veg. Get real withdrawal symptoms when I have been away for more than a few days and the veg is just an afterthought to the meat. To me there should be more veg than meat on the plate. Much better for the pocket too.

Asparagus season when you can get a bunch for pennies is my favourite food time of year. As all chefs keep telling us - seasonal is the key.

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I think you can probably spot people who don't eat fresh vegetables. Fat b'stards with skin blemishes poisoned by processed packet food. I eat lots of fresh veg. Goes great with meat.

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Three quarters of my evening meal is made up of vegetables or salad. Tonight it's runner beans, broad beans and potatoes from my garden along with corn on the cob, broccoli, cauliflower and carrots. I like a meal that's full of colour provided by veg/salad.

I stir fry, roast and steam veg and add garlic, herbs or butter sometimes. It's delicious and I never tire of it because I vary the veg, cooking method and additions to it.

When I was growing up I had to eat my veg which was a pile of mush. Yuk! I now call it pensioners veg when it's cooked like that :). I eat a lot of raw veg when I'm picking it from the garden or preparing bought stuff.

Like the original poster I see a lot of people leaving the veg/salad when out and about.

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I'll wait for someone else to tell you that tomatoes are a fruit.

Am I allowed to like both fruit and vegetables? 'Cos I do.

Though anyone of an age to remember the "traditional sunday lunch" - involving vegetables boiled to death - could be forgiven for having some very negative experiences of them. You just have to remind yourself, that was the era of plastic food.

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My mum used to start the Christmas sprouts boiling after the Harvest Festival.

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Three quarters of my evening meal is made up of vegetables or salad. Tonight it's runner beans, broad beans and potatoes from my garden along with corn on the cob, broccoli, cauliflower and carrots. I like a meal that's full of colour provided by veg/salad.

I stir fry, roast and steam veg and add garlic, herbs or butter sometimes. It's delicious and I never tire of it because I vary the veg, cooking method and additions to it.

When I was growing up I had to eat my veg which was a pile of mush. Yuk! I now call it pensioners veg when it's cooked like that :). I eat a lot of raw veg when I'm picking it from the garden or preparing bought stuff.

Like the original poster I see a lot of people leaving the veg/salad when out and about.

Absolutely, I feel restaurant meals are all out of proportion with the veg a mere

afterthought garnish. But I guess if the plates or serving dishes go back to the kitchen with the veg untouched then redtaurants will eventually tailor their servings accordingly.

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Absolutely, I feel restaurant meals are all out of proportion with the veg a mere

afterthought garnish. But I guess if the plates or serving dishes go back to the kitchen with the veg untouched then redtaurants will eventually tailor their servings accordingly.

Just go to a carvery and then you can have as much veg as you want. Some people slag off the chain carverys, but IME they vary significantly in quality. One that I go to occassionally is always good and always has a large selection of vegetables that are cooked perfectly (well according to my taste anyway).

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