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stuckin2up2down

What Percentage Of Farmland Is Put To Productive Use In The Uk?

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I've had several people recently say how important farms are for feeding people in the UK. I doubt this alot as lots of food comes from abroad or is intensively grown in glass houses.

Around here farmers are selling up and most of the fields never seem to be used for anything. Whole farms are used just for pheasant shooting.

Anyone more clued up know more about this? or a stat?

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Fckall to be honest.

When I grew up thee where stocka nimals i nthe field and food crops grown.

Now - empty.

Just sign off on the subs cheque.

The CAP is a joke.

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Round here the Council are pushing through plans to build on several open spaces currently accessible to the public as they own the land. It makes me a bit sick when you look at what boarders the public space they want to build on in the case of the one local to me... a golf course and fields used for peoples pets (horses). Private land not accessible to the public will be maintained for the benefit of the few and public open spaces destroyed. Why not CP the bloody fields used by the horsey set and build some houses on there fgs? Leave the common alone :(

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There's probably some sort of farming activity taking place, even if it's not immediately obvious like growing hay. I would imagine most land in this country would start reverting to scrub within the year if it wasn't grazed / mown / harvested.

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There's probably some sort of farming activity taking place, even if it's not immediately obvious like growing hay. I would imagine most land in this country would start reverting to scrub within the year if it wasn't grazed / mown / harvested.

Well just mowing every couple of months to hoover up some sub is not productive use.

Sounds like typical council behaviour, sadly. Mine is selling off the leisure centre field for houses.

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Apart from the massive farms there is no money in farming now. The majority of farmers don't get EU subsidies and many voted for Brexit because of the suffocating rules and regs imposed on them. My brother in law now rents his land to a big farmer and got himself a 9-5 job. Much less stress, shorter hours and 5 x the pay.

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I've had several people recently say how important farms are for feeding people in the UK. I doubt this alot as lots of food comes from abroad or is intensively grown in glass houses.

Around here farmers are selling up and most of the fields never seem to be used for anything. Whole farms are used just for pheasant shooting.

Anyone more clued up know more about this? or a stat?

A lot of farms are bought for tax purposes. Farmhouses have special rules.

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Apart from the massive farms there is no money in farming now. The majority of farmers don't get EU subsidies and many voted for Brexit because of the suffocating rules and regs imposed on them. My brother in law now rents his land to a big farmer and got himself a 9-5 job. Much less stress, shorter hours and 5 x the pay.

The land onwer gets subs.

Whether the poor sod farming the land does is another matter.

The UKS CAP money is ~3bln. It goes somewhere.

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A lot of farms are bought for tax purposes. Farmhouses have special rules.

Farms are excluded from inheritance tax...

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No idea, but as a contrarian I would imagine a lot less that the average person would think.

Having said thst, you do have to rest arable land, and a lot of empty fields are just recovering from being grazed etc.

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re farmers. It seems like a rubbish job at the moment, but in times of crisis, they are literally at the top of the food chain (although in Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia they didnt get treated too well, due to accusations of hording)

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The farmers grow what will fetch the highest price......in many cases that will be crops for fuel and crops for animal feed to produce animal products........up until now cheaper to import cheap foods......now the tables have turned. Don't think our farmers will sell to us if they can get a better price by exporting. ;)

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The farmers grow what will fetch the highest price......in many cases that will be crops for fuel and crops for animal feed to produce animal products........up until now cheaper to import cheap foods......now the tables have turned. Don't think our farmers will sell to us if they can get a better price by exporting. ;)

Yeah could be interesting with the falling pound. I heard quite a few years ago now, that meat consumption was going to rapidly increase in the developming world. As there is only so much space for animals, it would correspondingly have to decrease in the developed world.

I foresee many campaigns about meat being bad for you, where as in reality the adverts are there to soften the blow that you can no longer afford it.

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re farmers. It seems like a rubbish job at the moment, but in times of crisis, they are literally at the top of the food chain (although in Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia they didnt get treated too well, due to accusations of hording)

My mam who lived through the war often told stories of buying food under the counter and not going short of anything when rationing was implemented. Guess rationing only applied to big towns and cities. Those were n rural areas did very well

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My mam who lived through the war often told stories of buying food under the counter and not going short of anything when rationing was implemented. Guess rationing only applied to big towns and cities. Those were n rural areas did very well

And the poor (quelle surprise). The rich could still go to restaurants and hotels and eat like lords

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Well just mowing every couple of months to hoover up some sub is not productive use.

Sounds like typical council behaviour, sadly. Mine is selling off the leisure centre field for houses.

Mowing is to harvest hay or sillage that is used for winter animal feed. imo one of the negative effects of financialisation on farming has been to make good productive small farmers, who know their land in detail and how to get the best out of it in a sustainable fashion, economically unviable. Prairie style arable farming of vast acreages that seems to be on the increase is not suited long term to much of the land in the UK, and will most likely prove to be detrimental in the long run. Historically, farmers were able to make decent livings from small acreages, but the retail price of food is now so out of sync with the historical norm that this is very difficult to achieve. I was told by an elderly butcher that for a lot of the first half of the last century, many of his (and his ancestors') average working class family customers would spend around a third of the household (husband's) income on food and a third on rent.

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Most arable fields now have a ~5m border which is allowed to go to meadow. Great for wildlife, and the land can quickly be brought back into production. I believe farmers are paid for this.

Then there are fields on some of the most fertile land in the country now used for solar farms.

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Most arable fields now have a ~5m border which is allowed to go to meadow. Great for wildlife, and the land can quickly be brought back into production. I believe farmers are paid for this.

Then there are fields on some of the most fertile land in the country now used for solar farms.

The 5 metre meadow strips are a big help to bees as they cultivate many different wild flowers. As Caravan Monster said prarie style farming not good for the UK (especially as we are a very windy country).

As for solar farms they can be grazed around by sheep so are not removed from useage now or in the future.

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There's probably some sort of farming activity taking place, even if it's not immediately obvious like growing hay. I would imagine most land in this country would start reverting to scrub within the year if it wasn't grazed / mown / harvested.

^

This. Unused farmland would be tatty scrub, nettles, brambles, thistles, maybe small trees if it's been unused for long enough and there are any nearby to seed it. Meadow certainly isn't unused, just because it doesn't have any animals or cereal crops in it.

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Round here the Council are pushing through plans to build on several open spaces currently accessible to the public as they own the land. It makes me a bit sick when you look at what boarders the public space they want to build on in the case of the one local to me... a golf course and fields used for peoples pets (horses). Private land not accessible to the public will be maintained for the benefit of the few and public open spaces destroyed. Why not CP the bloody fields used by the horsey set and build some houses on there fgs? Leave the common alone :(

Why cp? Why not announce relaxed planning permission on the first 1000 houses worth of applications? Allowing people to build decent family home or gritty starter homes as they see fit on their own land - whether for sale or private use.

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The 5 metre meadow strips are a big help to bees as they cultivate many different wild flowers. As Caravan Monster said prarie style farming not good for the UK (especially as we are a very windy country).

As for solar farms they can be grazed around by sheep so are not removed from useage now or in the future.

Yes the borders are a great idea, also councils leaving verges to grow, anecdotally, I see far more birds of prey these days, its not just insects benefiting, but the entire food chain.

Never seen sheep grazing in a solar farm, not arguing that its possible, but perhaps too much bother for arable farmers who may have little knowledge of shepherding.

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^

This. Unused farmland would be tatty scrub, nettles, brambles, thistles, maybe small trees if it's been unused for long enough and there are any nearby to seed it. Meadow certainly isn't unused, just because it doesn't have any animals or cereal crops in it.

This ,drove past a field on a weekly basis for years ,it was striking as it looked like a bowling green ( my young daughter at the time used to call it the fairy field) never seen anything on there ,yet over the last five years it has become scrub land clearly not beiging used now

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Once farmers lock into the perpetual motion business-model of "grow weed, sell weed, grow pizza ingredients, sell cooked pizzas to millions of stoners" then the economy of this country will rocket..!

Battery hens and rapeseed are SOOOOOO last century...

XYY

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