Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Fairyland

Many Families Could Not Afford A Month's Rent If They Lost Job - Shelter

Recommended Posts

High housing costs and a lack of personal savings are cited by the charity as reasons for this.

The online survey by pollsters YouGov in July questioned 1,581 people in working families with children.

"Strong protections" are in place for "those who fall on difficult times," a government spokesman commented.

The spokesman said: "We are introducing the National Living Wage, increasing the personal tax allowance and giving the next generation choice and flexibility in their savings, including the Help to Save scheme for people on low incomes.

"We are continuing to spend around £90 billion a year on working age benefits to ensure a strong safety net for the most vulnerable.

"And for those who do fall on difficult times, there are strong protections in place to guard against the threat of homelessness, and ensure we don't return to the bad old days when homelessness in England was nearly double what it is today."

'Breaking point'

The online YouGov survey questioned 8,381 adults, including 1,581 members of working families with children.

It concluded that 37% of such families would be unable to cover their housing costs for more than one month with no job, while 23% said they would be unable to pay their housing costs at all.

Some 48% of families in the survey named the cost of housing as the biggest drain on their budget, the charity reported.

"These figures are a stark reminder that sky-high housing costs are leaving millions of working families stretched to breaking point, and barely scraping by from one pay cheque to the next," Shelter chief executive Campbell Robb said.

Saw a similar report somewhere else. Why is the MSM waking up now? Edited by Fairyland

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but for homeowners its different...benefits to pay the interest. savings or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but for homeowners its different...benefits to pay the interest. savings or not.

They only get a certain amount, anything above that isn't funded. Mortgagees by virtue tend to max out their credit cards and live month to month. You only have to hear the comments made at the time of the recent rate cut to realise how maxed out Mortgagees are. A quarter of a percent is going to save the Country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but for homeowners its different...benefits to pay the interest. savings or not.

I thought renters get full rent paid by HB if they loose provided they qualify for HB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not only hard working ones...

Ah yes of course - we can't forget those 6 year old chimney sweeps !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to Sky News, 37% of households could only pay their rent/mortgage for a month if they lost their jobs and 23% of working families would be unable to pay for any of their housing costs from the outset.

http://news.sky.com/story/third-of-households-close-to-homelessness-10528600

They can claim housing benefit to pay their rent, so this is not actually true.

There really is no consequence for borrowing money to spend on property that you can't pay back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They can claim housing benefit to pay their rent, so this is not actually true.

There really is no consequence for borrowing money to spend on property that you can't pay back.

Only if their rent is at or below HB levels.

I would have thought one of the main benefits to having a job is that you don't have to live in a HB level house. If not, there really is no point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought renters get full rent paid by HB if they loose provided they qualify for HB.

Why bother Saving then. If you lose your job you have to use up your savings first - if you have no savings then you get HB immediately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why bother Saving then. If you lose your job you have to use up your savings first - if you have no savings then you get HB immediately.

And when the government's finances collapse and they have to make ACTUAL cuts ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only if their rent is at or below HB levels.

I would have thought one of the main benefits to having a job is that you don't have to live in a HB level house. If not, there really is no point.

I was more thinking if you had a mortgage the state will pick up the tab should one lose their one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but for homeowners its different...benefits to pay the interest. savings or not.

Don't you have to wait 13 weeks before claiming that?

Why bother saving a penny if you loose your job and just claim housing benefit.

Saving and not spunking every single penny you earn is for idiots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't you have to wait 13 weeks before claiming that?

Why bother saving a penny if you loose your job and just claim housing benefit.

Saving and not spunking every single penny you earn is for idiots.

dunno, cant keep up with the changes in benefits entitlements. All I know, if you are prudent,is you get frack all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You only have to hear the comments made at the time of the recent rate cut to realise how maxed out Mortgagees are. A quarter of a percent is going to save the Country.

Except the 50 quid or so saved in interest will be offset by the increase in the cost of foreign stuff as the value of the pound is further devalued. But if the head of the Bank of England can't see this then how can we expect the "man in the street" to?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always advise people who have marginal financial lives and who may one day need to look towards the state for help[1] to accumulate any surplus as "under the counter" assets - gold, bitcoin, jewellery, etc.

[1] Most people these days. Seriously. But I'm thinking of early career academics on hourly pay (zero hours basically) or short fixed term contracts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This

I always advise people who have marginal financial lives and who may one day need to look towards the state for help[1] to accumulate any surplus as "under the counter" assets - gold, bitcoin, jewellery, etc.

[1] Most people these days. Seriously. But I'm thinking of early career academics on hourly pay (zero hours basically) or short fixed term contracts.

absolutely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always advise people who have marginal financial lives and who may one day need to look towards the state for help[1] to accumulate any surplus as "under the counter" assets - gold, bitcoin, jewellery, etc.

[1] Most people these days. Seriously. But I'm thinking of early career academics on hourly pay (zero hours basically) or short fixed term contracts.

This is exactly what I do. I will only store my long term savings in things that the state can't prove I own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Single mother-of-two Karen Lucas was made redundant from her job as a financial analyst and was out of work for almost two months."

I guess Karen Lucas should've thought better before becoming a single mother of two as a financial analyst.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   94 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.