Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Scunnered

Newsflash, Young People: Owning Your Own Home Isn't A Human Right

Recommended Posts

Newsflash, young people: owning your own home isn't a human right - your sense of entitlement won't solve this crisis.

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/newsflash-young-people-owning-your-own-home-isnt-a-human-right-leave-your-entitlement-at-the-door-a7167961.html

Includes just about every cliché there is. I can only imagine he's being deliberately provocative.

The comments are good though.

Edited by Scunnered

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other very special thing about residential property is that it is virtually tax-free, and here again we discover another bogus human right – the right to enjoy unearned capital gains on home ownership tax-free. This has grotesquely distorted the pattern of investment in this country so that relatively little is put into plant and kit that will raise productivity, and more is shovelled into the national Ponzi scheme that is the housing market. No government dares bring capital gains on property into line with other investments, even a bit. (That is with the sole exception of levying a virtual 100 per cent tax on you when you’re old and sick and are made to sell your home to pay for care bills; effectively a tax on dementia and other slow killers and a subsidy to those “fortunate” enough to peg it through a swift heart attack or encounter with a drunk driver, say).

There’s also a bit of inheritance tax liable on the tastier houses, but the fact remains that if you want to make loads of money tax-free then playing property is the best way to do it. This is a bad thing.

I really liked this bit. To be honest, it wasn't a bad article, just saying chill, owning a home isn't the be all end all. However, it didn't mention enough about how dire private renting is for most people and although buying a home shouldn't ever be considered a right, having somewhere affordable and secure to call your home, should be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not a right to own a home, but surely affordable housing is a right, right?! And if affordable housing is NOT a right, then all bets are off. If affordable housing is not a right, then fu3k the country that decides that that is fine. I am definitely not fine with that. That's why I'm in Thailand now, living in an affordable house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neithers an unfunded state or public sector pension, neither were council housing handed out ,40 years ago, or an OAP livingin a 3 bedder.

Its not a right, its a nessecity, which was provided to people whove been before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was so infuriated with the article that I ended up emailing him yesterday. To his credit, he replied to my email immediately, and we ended up in a bit of a back and forth email exchange. I suggested he come on here to tap into some of the wisdom on offer, so he may well be lurking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anyone say it was?

Surely the problem is nothing to do with 'human rights' and simply boils down to the fact that older generations both had it significantly easier and have decided to double-down on their good fortune by using BTL to soak the next generation. If BTL had existed on the current scale twenty years ago how many would have been able to save a deposit? How many would still be renting now?

How many current homeowners could afford to buy the home they live in, were they to start again? House prices have increased massively faster than wages for about twenty years. If it's all down to a free market then when do the market forces step in to meet the pent-up demand?

Young people are infinitely worse off than older ones were - no free education (instead loaded down with debt), no 3.5x salary mortgage for a decent home (instead loaded down with dangerous levels of debt), no job security (meaning you have to save a large buffer against periods of unemployment), no decent pensions (meaning more saving or penury in your old age). Most of the homeowning generation took most of those things for granted. And when the benefits stopped flowing their solution was to get 'returns' by upping the rents for other people's children.

Life isn't fair, but it's got a damn sight more unfair in a very short space of time. Surely one of the aims of a civilised society should be to smooth out some of the unfairness and give everyone the same chance. Otherwise what's the point if the current 'winners' are protected forever (triple lock, help to buy, housing benefit) at the expense of everyone else?

A BTL portfolio and a retirement spent on cruise ships isn't a 'human right' either and yet people have them, for far less effort than I've put towards trying to buy a house.

Do people writing articles like this one really think that they'd do as well out of life as they have done, were they born twenty years later?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tosser

To55er.CN-QdXjWcAACA4n.jpg

Oh dear, he forgot to put his home address and that piece of paper.

How will the refugees be able find him to take up his generous offer?

The Government should put up a notice board at Dover, with the full contact details of all these kind souls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear, he forgot to put his home address and that piece of paper.

How will the refugees be able find him to take up his generous offer?

The Government should put up a notice board at Dover, with the full contact details of all these kind souls.

He's following in the footsteps of the entire PLP front bench. When confronted their hubris soon falls away. It's all do what I tell you and not what I do. Let the Blairs house some.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The right to housing is the economic, social and cultural right to adequate housing and shelter. It is recognised in many national constitutions and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_to_housing

Definition[edit]
The right to housing is recognised in a number of international human rights instruments. Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognises the right to housing as part of the right to an adequate standard of living.[1] It states that:
“ Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control. ”
Article 11(1) of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) also guarantees the right to housing as part of the right to an adequate standard of living.[1]
In international human rights law the right to housing is regarded as a freestanding right. This was clarified in the 1991 General Comment no 4 on Adequate Housing by the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.[2] The general comment provides an authoritative interpretation of the right to housing in legal terms under international law.[1]
The Yogyakarta Principles on the application of international human rights law in relation to sexual orientation and gender identity affirm that "everyone has the right to adequate housing, including protection from eviction, without discrimination and that States shall a) take all necessary legislative, administrative and other measures to ensure security of tenure and access to affordable, habitable, accessible, culturally appropriate and safe housing, including shelters and other emergency accommodation, without discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or material or family status; B) take all necessary legislative, administrative and other measures to prohibit the execution of evictions that are not in conformity with their international human rights obligations, and ensure that adequate and effective legal or other appropriate remedies are available to any person claiming that a right to protection against forced evictions has been violated or is under threat of violation, including the right to resettlement, which includes the right to alternative land of better or equal quality and to adequate housing, without discrimination."[3]
The right to housing is also enshrined in Article 28 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Article 16 of the European Social Charter (Article 31 of the Revised European Social charter) and in the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights.[4] According to UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, aspects of right to housing under ICESCR include: legal security of tenure; availability of services, materials, facilities and infrastructure; affordability; habitability; accessibility; location and cultural adequacy.[5] As a political goal, right to housing was declared in F. D. Roosevelt's 1944 speech on the Second Bill of Rights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not a right to own a home, but surely affordable housing is a right, right?! And if affordable housing is NOT a right, then all bets are off. If affordable housing is not a right, then fu3k the country that decides that that is fine. I am definitely not fine with that. That's why I'm in Thailand now, living in an affordable house.

Housing in Thailand is even more unaffordable for the average worker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Housing could be affordable but since 97 (if not earlier) politicians have tried to make it more expensive.

Just make pro single parents share and there will be a million empty homes and prices and rents will crash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Housing could be affordable but since 97 (if not earlier) politicians have tried to make it more expensive.

Yep - because it has been in their best personal interests to do so. See London MP property flipping.

Just think how different things would have been if they had made Portcullis house or similar elsewhere in London a huge apartment block for MP's like they have in Norway.

MP's views and actions on the obvious housing bubble of the last decade + may have been very different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep - because it has been in their best personal interests to do so. See London MP property flipping.

Just think how different things would have been if they had made Portcullis house or similar elsewhere in London a huge apartment block for MP's like they have in Norway.

MP's views and actions on the obvious housing bubble of the last decade + may have been very different.

Actually I think it is partly because a lot of people think more expensive housing is good. In this case we DID get what most of us (not on this forum) wanted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The author has the gall to mention private renting in Germany and yet fails, conveniently for him, to compare the security of tenure and tenant rights in Germany as compared to the UK.

Pr1ck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The author has the gall to mention private renting in Germany and yet fails, conveniently for him, to compare the security of tenure and tenant rights in Germany as compared to the UK.

Pr1ck!

The classic sleight of hand for apologists of the current situation. Never explained or expanded upon.

They'd rather that delusion than face up to the possibility that they have massively dropped the political ball on their watch regarding protecting similar opportunities for future generations.

They are far more concerned with consolidating these policy-derived ill-gotten gains via inheritance to erroneously cement their 'legacy' as opportunity enablers for their own offspring. Everyone else, ah well, renting ain't so bad, Germans seem to like it. People here are just miserable because of the entitled mindset, life ain't fair dontchaknow!

"Thank goodness Mum and Dad left us $hitloads of property wealth they never paid for, we'd never have afforded a half of our 3 bed semi in Wimbledon without it, and a 5*joint mortgage for the rest of it"

Modern day philanthropism.

Edit made it much more ranty.

Edited by The Knimbies who say No

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The author has the gall to mention private renting in Germany and yet fails, conveniently for him, to compare the security of tenure and tenant rights in Germany as compared to the UK.

Pr1ck!

That is SO common - bang on about how 'everybody rents' in Germany, but no mention of why they're happy to. Or at least a lot happier than the average tenant here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of things tend not to be "a human right" anymore.

Healthcare? It's not a human right. Buy insurance.

Housing? It's not a human right.

It's interesting that nobody in the UK stands up to ask "why are those stupid plebs paying taxes then?"

I mean, the government wants to privatize the NHS.
Housing? Not a human right, apparently.

The way I see it, nothing relevant is a human right (anymore). I'm OK with that. What I'm NOT OK with is the fact that I pay taxes. If I have to pay an insurance company to drive a car, to get access to healthcare, to whatever, if I have to pay road tax as well, then why am I paying taxes anyway? Seems to me it's double taxation. One day governments all over the planet will decide that security isn't a human right either, they'll sell the "police force" and then you'll have to pay a subscription or something to be able to call 911....but they'll still tax people on top of that anyway.

The best part is that while they're telling you nothing is a human right and nothing is backed/supplied by the state (using our taxes), they'll also ask you to have children. As many as possible. They need future taxpayers. One has to wonder how you're going to have children with no home and no access to healthcare. Perhaps women will be asked to go "in the woods" to give birth (accompanied by the local shaman), as not to disturb the general population?

I'm not even going to read the article. Stop the planet, I need to get off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who gives a ****** whether it's a human right or not. The real question is, do you want to live in a world like this? Where the cost of putting a roof over your head costs over half your income for your whole life? Where families can be kicked out of their home at 2 months notice through no fault of their own? Where wealth is filtered into the hands of a minority of land and property owners? Where your control over your home is restricted for the benefit of your landlord?

It harms peoples lives both financially and personally. It's a drag on the UK economy. Its my right to point out how utterly stupid it is to continue down this road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use the main legal way to avoid tax and dump as much as possible into your sipp IMHO. Yes, maybe they'll go on a grab one day - and I'll deal with that when it happens, but for now it feels great.

That and working part time are my way of protesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The author has the gall to mention private renting in Germany and yet fails, conveniently for him, to compare the security of tenure and tenant rights in Germany as compared to the UK.

Pr1ck!

Also must have slipped the authors notice that not too long ago every single house in East Germany was owned by the state so this will sway ownership stats considerably.

I'd love to know what the percentage of home ownership is in the former West Germany, i'd bet its higher than in the UK.

Also last German i worked with was desperate to buy, whining that house prices cost too much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   91 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.