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stuckin2up2down

Why Do People Assume An Old-Ish Working Boiler With Parts Available Needs Replacing?

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The boiler in my house is from the 80s. Its worked fine for all the years I've lived here and the boiler guy says parts are still available and to keep it until it conks out.

I've done the maths and if a new boiler lives up to its energy efficiency (doubtful) it would save nearly 100 a year. So the new boiler would have to live for 20 years without any problems just to break even, this seems doubtful with new boilers these days that have so much more to go wrong.

Yet many people viewing the house see a boiler from the 80s and assume it needs to be ripped out and replaced.

My parents fell for the British Gas "your boiler is inefficient and wasting energy so you need a new one". They ripped out the one that had only ever broken down once in 28 years with a new shiny condensing one. It was a total liability and was constantly breaking down and was replaced after 5-6 years.

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Because people are at best short-sighted and at worst too thick to think these things through properly.

Next.

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Both boilers I have used have been over 25 years old.....still going strong, the one I use now I really do not want to get rid of so I won't, can still see it firing up like a heart for many years to come......people I know that have replaced their working old for new have had no end of problems, especially in the winter when things freeze up.

Not that difference to the car scrappage scheme IMO. ;)

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I was in exactly the same position, with a boiler of similar vintage. Just recently replaced it about a year after using the very last available part for it; they couldn't source any more. It was still working at that point but I didn't want it to conk out and have to be replaced at a time of its choosing (usually Dec 25th or Jan 1st).

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It's normally the sucking sound, that does it... and that's not coming from the boiler.

">>>>>>>>>>>>>>sucking sound<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< you're going to need a new boiler"

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The aspect of how long it will take to repay is key and, to their credit, the government statement of energy efficiency when you buy a house shows alongside each of the energy saving / efficiency measures how long the savings will take to offset the cost so that you can make an informed decision.

I have read of inefficient boilers costing £100 a week to run so replacing that's a no brainer.

Mine is about £500 a year (mainly for heating, don't run it in the summer) which doesn't sound bad but I will have a chat with the gasman when I get around to having bit serviced this year.

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Why? Because we live in a consumerist society.

"People" are attracted to shiny baubles, and any excuse is good for waving the plastic card and acquiring new stuff.

They will go to great lengths to rationalise it, but basically it's all about shiny baubles.

E.g. I regularly have run-ins with my OH: we have a 16 year old car that runs cheaply and reliably and hasn't got a spot of rust - or even of tarnished paint. Yet as soon as I mention maintenance e.g. replacing the engine oil, I'll hear the calls of "too expensive to run, just replace it!".

I will then retort "and how many tens of thousands is a new car then?" and watch the cognitive dissonance. It's sad in a way that someone I love so dearly has swallowed the consumerist bull**** hook, line and sinker :(

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On the plus side a new more efficient boiler would actually be burning less fuel to provide the same hea, so from a green/energy saving standpoint that is good

and you should have a well functioning system for a while that requires little or no maintenance.

On the downside, by design (and cost reduction) the boiler is more likely to be trash within a decade or so as the thinner chambers rot through. So cost savings could be unlikely compared to keeping the old one going. Really depends quite how efficient the old boiler is.

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It is also worth getting your heating system 'power flushed' every 3-4 years to remove sludge & what not from your radiators

I do hope that was a sarcastic comment.

Power flushing is the biggest scam in boiler maintenance. None of my properties has ever had the central heating power flushed (and never will) and have never had problems. Always had old boilers too and no expensive breakdowns despite only having then serviced every few years. In fact that reminds me, I must get my latest house boiler serviced. Been here three years and it's not been done yet.

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The aspect of how long it will take to repay is key and, to their credit, the government statement of energy efficiency when you buy a house shows alongside each of the energy saving / efficiency measures how long the savings will take to offset the cost so that you can make an informed decision.

I have read of inefficient boilers costing £100 a week to run so replacing that's a no brainer.

Mine is about £500 a year (mainly for heating, don't run it in the summer) which doesn't sound bad but I will have a chat with the gasman when I get around to having bit serviced this year.

The problem is not so much the well made built to last boiler, it is how much you heat, how much you have to heat, what you have done to insulate your home.......just finding a value for money duel fuel deal can save more than what a new boiler might save.....my g&e is £35 a month. ;)

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Not so sure if it is a scam. I recently had to remove radiators for tiling and they were filled with black sludge.

Well you'd hardly expect pure spring water to flow out would you?

If the rads still worked well there's no problems. If they didn't then remove them and flush through with a hosepipe outside. Slap it back on the wall, job done. £300-£500 saved.

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The problem is not so much the well made built to last boiler, it is how much you heat, how much you have to heat, what you have done to insulate your home.......just finding a value for money duel fuel deal can save more than what a new boiler might save.....my g&e is £35 a month. ;)

+1.

Turn your heating off for an extra hour a day. Makes an old inefficient boiler cheaper to run than the most efficient modern one.

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The problem is not so much the well made built to last boiler, it is how much you heat, how much you have to heat, what you have done to insulate your home.......just finding a value for money duel fuel deal can save more than what a new boiler might save.....my g&e is £35 a month. ;)

I started at £40 electric per month and £45 gas (I was thinking of that when I said £500, it's not that now) so £85 pm combined and now down to £46 combined and likely to drop again next year as I keep getting refunds. I put most of that reduction down to having solar panels and working with them (so the washing machine goes on when the sun shines).

With having the solar panels I will eventually move over to electrical storage heating but the the trigger for that will be a major problem with the gas boiler or radiators; I'm not about to junk a working system.

I'm not particularly economical with the heating in the winter as the first year I was and I had damp problems (mould on clothes) as a result. Since then I have bought a combined thermometer / hygrometer and use this to make sure that I'm turning the heating on sufficiently to stop the house becoming damp.

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We're on £81 a month gas and electric combined. That's a family of 5 (well 6 with our student lodger) and a wife that's home all day childminding. We're heavy users of the dishwasher, washing machine and tumble dryer too.

Never understood people who leave the thermostat at a set temperature and the boiler on permanently. Ours goes on only when needed.

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I must confess, I did it once. Results disappointing. And my mother has recently had a new boiler, which doesn't seem to get hot enough. Has anyone done it and actually seen the promised better performance or savings?

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The aspect of how long it will take to repay is key and, to their credit, the government statement of energy efficiency when you buy a house shows alongside each of the energy saving / efficiency measures how long the savings will take to offset the cost so that you can make an informed decision.

I have read of inefficient boilers costing £100 a week to run so replacing that's a no brainer.

Mine is about £500 a year (mainly for heating, don't run it in the summer) which doesn't sound bad but I will have a chat with the gasman when I get around to having bit serviced this year.

I find 100 a week very unbelievable unless its a manor house with single glazed windows and high ceilings. Unless im mistaken there hasn't been an amazing scientific breakthrough in heating water with gas.

+1.

Turn your heating off for an extra hour a day. Makes an old inefficient boiler cheaper to run than the most efficient modern one.

I find it hard to believe that many HPC'ers have heating on for even an hour a day!

Then again im kite flying with my for sale price, so any idiot looking at it at its current price might be just a stupid with maths and logic.

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Never understood people who leave the thermostat at a set temperature and the boiler on permanently. Ours goes on only when needed.

The thermostat at the "needed temperature" does that job for you, no?

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The thermostat at the "needed temperature" does that job for you, no?

Think thats how mine works.

I have switched my thermostat off in terms of heating. So it only heats water when required for dishes/washing machine etc..

My last electricity/gas bill for just under 3 months was about £85. Very decent.

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Because the Establishment doesn't realise that eveybody doesn't heat their houses 24/7 in winter and an upgrade may not save money because plebs with old boilers just put up with a colder house.

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Because the Establishment doesn't realise that eveybody doesn't heat their houses 24/7 in winter and an upgrade may not save money because plebs with old boilers just put up with a colder house.

It is not the boiler....draughty detached waste heat, next door helps heat and conserve heat....turn the lights off and don't heat the loft space unless living in it....a house needs to breathe.;)

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Not so sure if it is a scam. I recently had to remove radiators for tiling and they were filled with black sludge.

I had a lack of heating to an upper floor. Lifting floorboards and dismantling central heating pipes revealed thick, black sludge aplenty. Long job, using length of stiff wire, powerful air pressure etc. Finally cleared, and hot water actually started getting to top floor radiators...

Black sludge exists, and gets thicker as it gets older. I've seen it...

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I do hope that was a sarcastic comment.

Power flushing is the biggest scam in boiler maintenance. None of my properties has ever had the central heating power flushed (and never will) and have never had problems. Always had old boilers too and no expensive breakdowns despite only having then serviced every few years. In fact that reminds me, I must get my latest house boiler serviced. Been here three years and it's not been done yet.

Standard - 3-4 years is nothing, especially if you know a decent plumber

I've come across a few slum 'landlords' in my time - I'm sure you don't need to worry about your properteeeees!

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We have an immersion heater from the 70s. It is heated via excess power from the solar panels - and provides a piping hot tank of water about 8 months of the year. For the remainder of the year, we boil the kettle for washing up, and use the electric shower. I can't see us changing the current system until it conks out.

No gas, no central heating. Electric blanket on cold nights. Wood burning stove for the living room. Energy bill is under £20/month.

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