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Will!

Anyone Been Involved With The Air / Marine / Rail Accident Investigation Branches?

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I know we have individuals from all walks of life on here!

I'm thinking about applying for a job with the new Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch. This new body is a branch of 'NHS Improvement' tasked with investigating serious accidents and near misses in the NHS. It's going to be modelled on, and run by a former head of, the Air Accident Investigation Branch of the Department for Transport as the NHS has shown time and time again that too many people in it are too mediocre and/or complacent for it to put itself in order.

Has anyone here been involved with the Air / Marine / Rail Accident Investigation Branches? What were their strengths and weaknesses? Did they have the right people, the right organisation, both or something else? Maybe just the right 'culture'?

Cheers

Will

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I know we have individuals from all walks of life on here!

I'm thinking about applying for a job with the new Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch. This new body is a branch of 'NHS Improvement' tasked with investigating serious accidents and near misses in the NHS. It's going to be modelled on, and run by a former head of, the Air Accident Investigation Branch of the Department for Transport as the NHS has shown time and time again that too many people in it are too mediocre and/or complacent for it to put itself in order.

Has anyone here been involved with the Air / Marine / Rail Accident Investigation Branches? What were their strengths and weaknesses? Did they have the right people, the right organisation, both or something else? Maybe just the right 'culture'?

Cheers

Will

Funny enough... PM me.

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Funny enough... PM me.

Going by your tales on here you seem to have lived an unbelievably varied life so far... :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Will, for your own sake don't believe a word of what TMT tells you!

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Speaking from ignorance here ... my guess being as good as yours ...

If you truly love interminable highly politicised committee work, you might be well-suited for it.

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If you truly love interminable highly politicised committee work, you might be well-suited for it.

That's a possibility, but Keith Conradi, former head of the AAIB and now the Chief Investigator of HSIB, seemed like he had a bit more about him at his pre-appointment hearing than a typical NHS very senior manager empty suit.

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I know we have individuals from all walks of life on here!

I'm thinking about applying for a job with the new Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch. This new body is a branch of 'NHS Improvement' tasked with investigating serious accidents and near misses in the NHS. It's going to be modelled on, and run by a former head of, the Air Accident Investigation Branch of the Department for Transport as the NHS has shown time and time again that too many people in it are too mediocre and/or complacent for it to put itself in order.

Has anyone here been involved with the Air / Marine / Rail Accident Investigation Branches? What were their strengths and weaknesses? Did they have the right people, the right organisation, both or something else? Maybe just the right 'culture'?

Cheers

Will

If its anything like the HSE as a front line inspector you'll be debating which fatality to investigate and which one not to given the paucity of resources.

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If its anything like the HSE as a front line inspector you'll be debating which fatality to investigate and which one not to given the paucity of resources.

Given the budget of £3.4m and the goal of thirty investigations per year this is a distinct possibility. If the Chief Investigator was the usual NHS empty suit then I would suspect that HSIB was being set up to allow the government to say they're doing something with the expectation that it would fail and be re-absorbed into the NHS in a couple of years. The fact that Keith Conradi comes from the well-respected (it seems to me) AAIB gives me hope that this is a serious attempt to investigate accidents in the NHS.

No blame? In the NHS?

Conradi says that he hopes once a few investigations are complete people in the NHS will see that they can trust HSIB, much like people in the air industry know that AAIB will be fair with them. Personally I think he underestimates just how toxic the culture in dodgy NHS institutions is. Understanding that culture, but not being part of it (I've personally been a victim of a couple of medical accidents), is one of the things that makes me think I'd be good at a job at HSIB.

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Given the budget of £3.4m and the goal of thirty investigations per year this is a distinct possibility. If the Chief Investigator was the usual NHS empty suit then I would suspect that HSIB was being set up to allow the government to say they're doing something with the expectation that it would fail and be re-absorbed into the NHS in a couple of years. The fact that Keith Conradi comes from the well-respected (it seems to me) AAIB gives me hope that this is a serious attempt to investigate accidents in the NHS.

Conradi says that he hopes once a few investigations are complete people in the NHS will see that they can trust HSIB, much like people in the air industry know that AAIB will be fair with them. Personally I think he underestimates just how toxic the culture in dodgy NHS institutions is. Understanding that culture, but not being part of it (I've personally been a victim of a couple of medical accidents), is one of the things that makes me think I'd be good at a job at HSIB.

AIB are detached, thorough and professional.

NHS is bent and serves the people who work in it, some a lot more than others.

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Well, I've just heard Keith Conradi speak at the Royal Society of Medicine. He was quite inspirational, although I think he's got his work cut out for him!

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He was very keen to emphasise that he was only in week 2 of his job and he hadn't written the job description for his investigators yet. I didn't want to press him too hard and come across as a nutter (no more so than any other HPCer, anyway) but it sounded like he was open to being persuaded by candidates that they were right for the job rather than he had a fixed idea of who he wanted to hire, which is good for me. We shall see!

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He was very keen to emphasise that he was only in week 2 of his job and he hadn't written the job description for his investigators yet. I didn't want to press him too hard and come across as a nutter (no more so than any other HPCer, anyway) but it sounded like he was open to being persuaded by candidates that they were right for the job rather than he had a fixed idea of who he wanted to hire, which is good for me. We shall see!

Best of luck.

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I briefly assisted a crash investigation with some AAIB guys. They certainly seemed to know their stuff.

I'm guessing it's hard for SJWs to infiltrate and destroy an organization whose whole purpose is to deal with reality.

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I'm guessing it's hard for SJWs to infiltrate and destroy an organization whose whole purpose is to deal with reality.

At the RSM meeting where I heard Keith Conradi speak there were also talks by a senior police officer, a senior executive at the Environment Agency and a senior patient safety person at a large NHS Trust. The police officer and the Environment Agency executive were both intelligent adults, exactly the kind of people you would hope to find in positions of significant responsibility. In contrast, the NHS person gave a talk full of infantile assumptions and displayed no understanding of the reasons behind the numerous serious and well-publicised patient safety incidents at her hospital.

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At the RSM meeting where I heard Keith Conradi speak there were also talks by a senior police officer, a senior executive at the Environment Agency and a senior patient safety person at a large NHS Trust. The police officer and the Environment Agency executive were both intelligent adults, exactly the kind of people you would hope to find in positions of significant responsibility. In contrast, the NHS person gave a talk full of infantile assumptions and displayed no understanding of the reasons behind the numerous serious and well-publicised patient safety incidents at her hospital.

Ah you pronoun gave the game away.

Did she have a clipboard and ditzy patterned skirt?

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I think she'd left the clipboard at home, but not the habit of talking in a sing-song voice which I think is supposed to show that she is car-ing but actually shows that she's a bit thick.

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Ah you pronoun gave the game away.

Did she have a clipboard and ditzy patterned skirt?

It's not really a gender thing. It's much more to do with the way in which the NHS tends to hire for intermediate level roles. The NHS has fixed pay bands, and very specific criteria and responsibilities for what defines a band. In general, they pay towards the lowest salary available in the market for a given level of non-clinical experience/skill.

Not only that, but there is a strong tendency to try to recruit internally, rather than go out to advert. Often times, they will only advertise externally if there are no likely applicants internally, or if there are concerns over a likely internal candidate's suitability. Additionally, it is very difficult to take account of skills/qualifications of candidates which HR hadn't anticipated candidates having.

I've already told my tales about encouters with the member of staff in charge of "information governance", who insisted on making work so difficult that people turned to progressively less and less secure ways of doing it. This is the same person who insisted that when we went out to tender for various IT products that the "the vendor must protect their source code from being divulged, and must confirm that they have not used any open-source components". In this case, this staff member could not understand how open-source software could possibly be secure, and thought that the only way a software product could be secure was if the source was restricted.

Or the person that was promoted to be the administrator of a radiology digital image storage system; as a highly specialised product, it was thought that it should be a radiology staff member who administers it and liaises with vendor support, rather than an IT staff member. They didn't even understand the term "server" when I tried to contact them with technical difficulties.

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It's not really a gender thing. It's much more to do with the way in which the NHS tends to hire for intermediate level roles. The NHS has fixed pay bands, and very specific criteria and responsibilities for what defines a band. In general, they pay towards the lowest salary available in the market for a given level of non-clinical experience/skill.

Not only that, but there is a strong tendency to try to recruit internally, rather than go out to advert. Often times, they will only advertise externally if there are no likely applicants internally, or if there are concerns over a likely internal candidate's suitability. Additionally, it is very difficult to take account of skills/qualifications of candidates which HR hadn't anticipated candidates having.

I've already told my tales about encouters with the member of staff in charge of "information governance", who insisted on making work so difficult that people turned to progressively less and less secure ways of doing it. This is the same person who insisted that when we went out to tender for various IT products that the "the vendor must protect their source code from being divulged, and must confirm that they have not used any open-source components". In this case, this staff member could not understand how open-source software could possibly be secure, and thought that the only way a software product could be secure was if the source was restricted.

Or the person that was promoted to be the administrator of a radiology digital image storage system; as a highly specialised product, it was thought that it should be a radiology staff member who administers it and liaises with vendor support, rather than an IT staff member. They didn't even understand the term "server" when I tried to contact them with technical difficulties.

But wheres the adult who says Wtf?

Wierdly my first rnvojnter with Nhs as an org was with digital xrays. It was some reasearch into moving to digitised images. Resolution was not there then, it was an exercise into how working practises might be changed. Straight away we ran into an issue as someone would no longer have a job.

At a later date when the nhsit thing was blowing billions, i looked at what they were trying to do - i do large scale distributed systems. First surprise, they were just deploying systems that had already been 80% done HL7 and all that. The money was being wasted trying to get people and orgs to adopt different working practices.

I was dlightly connected into the attempt to adopt asn1 as the data represetation standard. Went for hl7v3 which is xml based and a total disaster. xml needs burying.

I hear but dont know that hl7v3 will be retired early. thry dhoild have spoken to any televoms person doing wap.

Ive been in orgs where a bunch of idiots select the wrong tech. It happens. What doesnt happen is that the same people are in charge for a second go.

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It's not really a gender thing. It's much more to do with the way in which the NHS tends to hire for intermediate level roles. The NHS has fixed pay bands, and very specific criteria and responsibilities for what defines a band. In general, they pay towards the lowest salary available in the market for a given level of non-clinical experience/skill.

Indeed. Although the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch will initially be part of the NHS Trust Development Authority (now rebadged as NHS Improvement) I'm hoping that Keith Conradi will bring a very different approach to recruitment.

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