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House Prices To Rise £40,000 In The Next Five Years Despite Eu Tremors

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/07/28/house-prices-to-rise-40000-in-the-next-five-years-despite-eu-tre/

The increases mean the average UK house price could rise from £194,000 in 2016 to £234,000 in 2021 - a jump of of £40,000.

The economic forecaster said despite "post-Brexit tremors", house prices are set to increase by 5.7pc over 2016 as a whole. Earlier this year, annual house price growth was running as high as 8pc, but Cebr expects to see a slowdown in house price growth over the second half of this year.

Same old same old.

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New entrants to the UK DEBTponzi (aka new blood DEBTjunkies) to increase their inDEBTedness over existing DEBTjunkies by forty thousands pounds over the next five years.

ps #megabubbles never burst

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Checking the author's CV, she attended a premium price private teaching college in the USA followed by failing to complete an MSc at LSE. just saying.

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Hmmm, yeah sadly this is starting to become more likely. It doesn't look like sentiment is having a big impact based on my search area. Any nothing has really changed to impact how much people can afford to pay. So without something big happening to impact demand, a sentiment based drop in the short term is looking quite optimistic in my area at least.

Central London, I'd be more optimistic.

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Hmmm, yeah sadly this is starting to become more likely. It doesn't look like sentiment is having a big impact based on my search area. Any nothing has really changed to impact how much people can afford to pay. So without something big happening to impact demand, a sentiment based drop in the short term is looking quite optimistic in my area at least.

Central London, I'd be more optimistic.

When London blows the whole country blows IMO. Prime London already topped out. Crash is on brother/sister.

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When London blows the whole country blows IMO. Prime London already topped out. Crash is on brother/sister.

Looking at that article that says Prime Central london collapsed 10% in a week, now down 12%, on top of the 10% from the previous year...thats 20%+ in 1 year now.....

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Looking at that article that says Prime Central london collapsed 10% in a week, now down 12%, on top of the 10% from the previous year...thats 20%+ in 1 year now.....

IMHO prime London is so stratospheric in it's prices that it bears little relation to 'normal' property for the likes of me and you

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When London blows the whole country blows IMO. Prime London already topped out. Crash is on brother/sister.

I'm not so sure. I think prime London is somewhat divorced and moves more like a stock market, but then a lot of those homes also get traded as shares in trusts rather than as property

The bigger issue is that due to Brexit the UK now looks cheaper to foreign buyers, so I suspect some will comeback in.

The issue with normal UK domestic residential property is different in that it is being supported by ultra low interest rates and it never got out of hand quite as much as London. Of course Brexit will also serve to keep rates down longer.

Unfortunately it looks like Brexit devaluation has really screwed generation rent.

Edited by Mikhail Liebenstein

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If prices keep rising and it is clear the governbankment will do everything it takes to keep HPI going, is it worth just chucking everything in to a property P2P lending companies that pays 7-12% per annum?

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If prices keep rising and it is clear the governbankment will do everything it takes to keep HPI going, is it worth just chucking everything in to a property P2P lending companies that pays 7-12% per annum?

....the ponzi will continue to survive as long as people keep making the monthly payments. ;)

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If we're building more and more housing, surely prices would be going down? I mean, that's what the government keep telling us..... <_<

..they are not building them to meet current needs...and there are more and more people coming in..... :rolleyes:

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Prime drives the rest of Central London, which drives the rest of London which drives the SE etc etc etc

Same on the way up as on the crashdown.

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New entrants to the UK DEBTponzi (aka new blood DEBTjunkies) to increase their inDEBTedness over existing DEBTjunkies by forty thousands pounds over the next five years.

ps #megabubbles never burst

That's OK, you not heard a BTL? just rent em out innit...

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New entrants to the UK DEBTponzi (aka new blood DEBTjunkies) to increase their inDEBTedness over existing DEBTjunkies by forty thousands pounds over the next five years.

ps #megabubbles never burst

That's OK, you not heard a BTL? just rent em out innit...

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Nina Skero, Cebr senior economist and the main author of the report, said: "Although Brexit has certainly sent shockwaves, Cebr expects the housing market to slow down but not plummet.

"Years of underbuilding mean that demand would have to fall very dramatically to meet the low level of supply increases. "Keeping in mind that construction companies are very likely to limit their output further in light of Brexit, price pressures will also come from the supply side."

Taking my lead from Si1, I also looked into the 'author'.

Bbc Inside Out - A Party Political Broadcast On Behalf Of Your Landlord.

Started by Man of Kent, Feb 01 2016 09:59 PM

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/208316-bbc-inside-out-a-party-political-broadcast-on-behalf-of-your-landlord/?p=1102879633

-----

This is totally nuts.

Just tracked down the source of the radio interview which is the indispensable Radio Kent Breakfast, "John Warnett and Maggie Doyle bring you news, travel and weather, plus Kent stories."

People who've checked out the TV broadcast will know that it features a contribution from Nina Skero of the CEBR and she also appeared on Radio Kent Breakfast promoting the idea that people "choose to rent" (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03g0y6n - 01:32:15 on the player) appearing alongside Marion Money (I am not making this up) the National Landlords Association's Representative in Kent.

..........

..........

VtJ9tUdH.jpg

Recall watching that Inside Out (blargghh) - a few whinging landlord/BTLers - and at least one 'grateful' tenant. I recall that tenant had a fondness for Guinness, and didn't want LHA money coming to her but to be paid direct to her landlord.

Can't fully recall Nina S's own part in the show. No longer available. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06z8hgd

Ahh; thanks Neverwhere. Just found your transcript.

Rachel Royce: So will the Chancellor's aim of helping ordinary people get on the housing ladder by raising taxes for buy-to-let landlords work? Nina Skero is an economist and housing market expert for the Centre for Business and Economic Research.

Nina Skero: Well it'll probably work for some, and not so much for others. So for people that were already very seriously considering buying a home, and that have already been saving up for a deposit, it probably can help them that there will be less competition for the properties that are available on the market, from buy-to-let investors. So homes will be available to first time buyers.

But having said that there is other people - for example current property owners, people who are choosing to rent,

Timestamp 09.00

Nina Skero: or aren't in a position to save up for a deposit, and of course existing tenants – that probably won't be helped by the change in the taxation.

Chris Norris: From the research we do with our members we predict that something like 600,000 landlords will have to exit the market, and take with them their properties. So it stands to reason, frankly, that some of those properties may go on to the market, may be bought by the kind of, kind of individuals and households the Chancellor wants to encourage into owner-occupation.

A lot of them won't be. A lot of them will be the shared housing, the student housing. The housing, frankly, that's desperately needed in lots of, lots of parts of the country, particularly in the South East.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/208316-bbc-inside-out-a-party-political-broadcast-on-behalf-of-your-landlord/?p=1102879826

Real estate runs on money.

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