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karhu

Uk House Price Growth 'quickens' - Opdm

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I don't see what "investigation" it needs, since it's saying exactly the same thing as Rightmove, Halifax and Nationwide have already reported. There's a very consistent message from the various house price surveys -- except for Hometrack, who have always been out of step with everyone else, including the Land Registry's definitive figures, and can thus safely be ignored.

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I don't see what "investigation" it needs, since it's saying exactly the same thing as Rightmove, Halifax and Nationwide have already reported. There's a very consistent message from the various house price surveys -- except for Hometrack, who have always been out of step with everyone else, including the Land Registry's definitive figures, and can thus safely be ignored.

I was more thinking about regional variability etc. Averages are always difficult to understand.

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Guest Riser

Got to laugh typical BBC spin, ' Breaking News' House prices in NOVEMBER rose, that was before Brown Burst the SIPPS bubble.

_41220176_breaking_news_203.jpg

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Got to laugh typical BBC spin, ' Breaking News' House prices in NOVEMBER rose, that was before Brown Burst the SIPPS bubble.

_41220176_breaking_news_203.jpg

Yea good point. We saw this previously in the Nationwide figures. However, Nationwide are very cautious about 2006.

Edited by karhu

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Thanks for the link, Surrey Cash Buyer. I've extracted figure 1 from the report, which shows annual hpi according to the ODPM. Please look carefully at this graph and see if you agree with the BBC headline "house price growth quickens"

beeb_bull.jpg

Someone at the BBC must be really worried about their BTL portfolio!

post-2154-1137407036.jpg

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I read this before coming here this morning and laughed out loud.

The "House Price Growth quickens" comes from a 2.5% annualised increase from a -0.5% annualised drop in October. When you analyse that, the reality must be that October saw a 0.04% drop and Nov a 0.2% rise. Hardly earth-shattering.

As has been pointed out, when you take into account SIPPs and the fact that it is only the higher value properties that are shifted (not the smaller 1/2 beds), the figures don't really seem to stack to anything positive.

I don't think the story merits any in-depth regional analysis on this basis.

Edited by woody

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UK Average House Price

July 2005 - £186,207

August 2005 - £186,208

September 2005 - £186,638

October 2005 - £185,398

November 2005 - £186,431

I'd say there is no real statistical significance here to suggest a movement in either direction.

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Definitely regional variations.

House price inflation varied throughout the UK.

In London average prices rose 2.2% during the year to November, compared with a 0.5% fall in October.

Prices continued to move upwards in the north-west and north-east of England and in Northern Ireland.

However, in Wales and Scotland the annual rate of price increase slowed sharply.

In Wales the inflation rate in fell from 8.8% to 6.5% and in Scotland the rate fell from 9.3% to 8.9%.

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From the same article

"The findings echo those of commercial surveys, such as the Halifax and Nationwide, which have indicated that the housing market has come off the boil in areas which enjoyed the strongest growth in the early part of last year."

House price inflation is something to be enjoyed!!! Sums up the attitude and spin of BBC News reporting that we have seen so many examples of. Despite all the complaints they continue to spout VI propaganda.

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Thanks for the link, Surrey Cash Buyer. I've extracted figure 1 from the report, which shows annual hpi according to the ODPM. Please look carefully at this graph and see if you agree with the BBC headline "house price growth quickens"

beeb_bull.jpg

Someone at the BBC must be really worried about their BTL portfolio!

:lol::lol: I think someone should send this graph to the BBC. Talk about spin.

On a serious note, if you look at November last year, we can probably expect some kind of 'spring bounce' without upsetting the downward trend. Although it will be interesting to see the impact of the SIPPS effect.

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Am I the only one who looks at that number and thinks – that’s 7 ½ times average salary and a 1% above base 25 year repayment mortgage would cost nearly £1200 a month i.e. nearly all of the after tax income of someone on an average wage?

If house prices and wages keep pace with inflation over the next few years how are today’s housing equity poor mid-20s couples going to be able to afford to have a family when they approach 30? Even if they both work full time in average jobs by the time they have paid the mortgage, council tax and made provision for their retirement a lot more than half of their take home pay will have gone.

There are only two way this situation gets resolved – either the economy performs better and wages rise substantially or house prices fall. I know which outcome I think is the more likely.

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I think we're looking at a spring bounce, time will tell though.

Would you please stop saying that!

Mind you, I think there minght be a spring bounce in the number of homes up for sale:

Quote from expats

Seems like everybody is putting there house on sale in march! 4 people in work and an other 3 friends are planning too, from looking at other topics on this board it seems people are having trouble selling in the current market, so it won't be helped by giving even more choice to the buyers.

:lol:

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I don't see what "investigation" it needs, since it's saying exactly the same thing as Rightmove, Halifax and Nationwide have already reported. There's a very consistent message from the various house price surveys -- except for Hometrack, who have always been out of step with everyone else, including the Land Registry's definitive figures, and can thus safely be ignored.

Isn't Hometrack and RICS the only index that takes into account houses that haven't sold?

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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