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frugalista

How Many *empty* Bedrooms In Your Parents' House?

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I'm trying to quantify how much housing supply is locked up in the houses of older people who are reluctant to move. Note, its *empty* bedrooms, not total number of bedrooms.

frugalista

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4.

But they're not exactly empty. They're full of 40 years' worth of assorted junk accumulated by all members of the family.

Okay :) Obviously by "empty" what I meant is that they are not the regular sleeping place for anyone.

frugalista

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My dad talked about downsizing this year to be nearer the shops. I think they'd be mad to move as they like the peace and quiet of where they live and having neighbours all around them will drive him insane in about a week.

His main reason he couldn't was he had 3 sheds and a garage full of junk - andf then recently they've been putting things away in the loft space... so I assume that means they're not planning on moving or are going to leave a loft full of stuff for the new people. :)

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They did have 2 but i moved back in and made the second my office.

Still playing the waiting game - number of chicks being bedded has dropped dramatically though ;-((

Rather pay rent to my folks than a gimp!!

Plus it gives me more drinking money, clothes ironed, tucked in at night and a pack lunch with a note from my mum in the morning!

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I think the structure of modern society plays a part here. Fewer people live close to their friends and family these days, but tend to visit a few times a year.

People NEED the spare room these days to put up the frequent visitors who come to stay. Obviously it would be more sensible for people to stay in a hotel, but people prefer to be able to share their home with friends and family.

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Only 1 in my parents house, tho it is 6x8 so calling it bedroom is a bit of push, you only just get a bed in there!

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I think the structure of modern society plays a part here. Fewer people live close to their friends and family these days, but tend to visit a few times a year.

People NEED the spare room these days to put up the frequent visitors who come to stay. Obviously it would be more sensible for people to stay in a hotel, but people prefer to be able to share their home with friends and family.

These were my thoughts from another thread:

One spare bedroom makes sense. Two (which my parents have) is maybe justifiable if you are wealthy (they're not) and expect a lot of visitors (they don't). I've tried to get them to downsize, they're not particularly sentimentally attached to the house, they just can't really be bothered with the hassle of moving.

Three or more bedrooms seems like they are really just hanging on for extreme sentimentality or speculation.

It's a bit of a waste of life; the oldies could downsize and fund a trip round the world in a hot air balloon (or whatever else brightens up those autumn years) and some kid somewhere would get his/her own bedroom.

This poll ain't scientific but it looks pretty clear that a lot of houses have 3 or more empty bedrooms. Surely this is where all the UK's housing supply has gone.

frugalista

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These were my thoughts from another thread:

This poll ain't scientific but it looks pretty clear that a lot of houses have 3 or more empty bedrooms. Surely this is where all the UK's housing supply has gone.

frugalista

Bizarrely many parents may have the same view as my parents that they need spare bedrooms for family get togethers because none of us has a house big enough for family get togethers, if you see what I mean?

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Bizarrely many parents may have the same view as my parents that they need spare bedrooms for family get togethers because none of us has a house big enough for family get togethers, if you see what I mean?

It's the ultimate irony.

Until recently, Ma and Pa frgualista had a moggy which mistress frugalista (my other half) was severely allergic to. So obviously we could not actually stay in their house.

Anyway, while the moggy was around, for family get togethers me and the mistress used to stay in a nice little B&B overlooking the local common. It was £40 a night or so. We'd stay at my parents till late (or till mistress frugalista's inhaler had run out) and then go to the B&B last thing at night. It was pleasant. If you add that up over the year it's money well spent really, the parents are paying that probably just to heat the extra room (let alone considering the opportunity cost of the money tied up in it).

The cat has now gone to the great cattery in the sky, at the grand old age of 17.

frugalista

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Excellent subject for a poll Frugalista.

This is a major issue and influence on HPI.

Round our way there are hundreds of lovely 3/4 bed semis with nothing but some

old dear and her cats rattling in.

It'll be the same for about the next 20 years.

This is the same generation that gets full social welfare and pensions which we (in my 30's) have to pay for but wont benefit from.

Kill the old!!!!

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This is the same generation that gets full social welfare and pensions which we (in my 30's) have to pay for but wont benefit from.

Kill the old!!!!

Now, that's going a bit too far. Just give 'em a stern talking to, I say.

frugalista

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Had to vote n/a- my parents are divorced. My dad left my mum about three years ago and left her with the house- a four bed semi which they owned outright (this was a pretty fair arrangement all told). So- she now has a four bed semi with two empty bedrooms, one very small. At the moment my youngest brother lives in the other one while he goes to university. I suppose he'll be living with her for a few years yet. After that though- my mum has IIRC actually expressed an interest in downsizing, she's a frugal woman with few posessions and will certainly not need a 4-bed house all to herself. It's a lovely house though- and if she does decide to move I'd be quite keen to buy it off her, especially if I have kids by then. They bought it when I was 5, so I'm quite attached to it....

My dad now lives in a 2-bed flat in E14, bought last year. Happily, he can afford to lose money, although he told me that his mortgage is something like £1700 a month (I have no idea what the term is). Rents on identical flats in his block (I looked on Rightmove) are £250pw :blink:.

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cant we just stash them all in one huge uber-home and have done with it ?

then we can get back to teh beach party.

P...A....R....T....Y....WHOOOOOooooo....WHOOOOOoooooo !!!

(for our american posters)

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P...A....R....T....Y....WHOOOOOooooo....WHOOOOOoooooo !!!

(for our american posters)

I am NOT american, you limey wise-ass. Jeez, that was like, totally lame.

I am as British as a pot noodle, the son of two practising morris dancers!

frugalista

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i was all like...

cant we just stash them all in one huge uber-home and have done with it ?

then we can get back to teh beach party.

and so frugalista was all like.....

I am NOT american, you limey wise-ass. Jeez, that was like, totally lame.

so i was all....

P...A....R....T....Y....WHOOOOOooooo....WHOOOOOoooooo !!!

(for our american posters)

and he was all....

I am as British as a pot noodle, the son of two practising morris dancers!

so i was like hurgh.

then i 'made out' with his sister till ten o'clock with a popsicle......

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Well Spanish is "mi casa de padres es mi casa"

in the style of mi casa, su casa"

If you don't already know it, the following translator website is great:

Babelfish

That's a terrible translation! The spanish should be

"la casa de mis padres es mi casa".

In latin it would be a lot more complicated, you'd have to use the genitive.

frugalista

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That's a terrible translation! The spanish should be

"la casa de mis padres es mi casa".

In latin it would be a lot more complicated, you'd have to use the genitive.

frugalista

Hmm ok maybe that translator isn't so great!!!! :lol:

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I'm trying to quantify how much housing supply is locked up in the houses of older people who are reluctant to move. Note, its *empty* bedrooms, not total number of bedrooms.

frugalista

It is bad enough most people are losing their pensions and having to work past 65. Now people like you will be waiting on the doorstep of people who are returning home after their last day of work to snatch their door keys with a brief explanation 'now you old couple are retired you can't have this 3 or 4 bedroom house anymore'.

If someone has worked hard all their life often from the age of 14 to the age of 65 they deserve to spend a comfortable retirement in the house they paid for, in the house they decorated and furnished to their own style and in the house they have all their memories of children growing up. Plus, of course, they will need a place and proably garden to entertain their grandchildren.

You are giving people a reason not to do a day of work in their life. Why should they stuggle to pay for a house and to furnish it their tast only to have someone like you snatch it off them the day they retire.

This policy is worst than any policy thought up by M Thatcher or T. Blair.

Edited by Padiham

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It is bad enough most people are losing their pensions and having to work past 65. Now people like you will be waiting on the doorstep of people who are returning home after their last day of work to snatch their door keys with a brief explanation 'now you old couple are retired you can't have this 3 or 4 bedroom house anymore'.

If someone has worked hard all their life often from the age of 14 to the age of 65 they deserve to spend a comfortable retirement in the house they paid for, in the house they decorated and furnished to their own style and in the house they have all their memories of children growing up. Plus, of course, they will need a place and proably garden to entertain their grandchildren.

You are giving people a reason not to do a day of work in their life. Why should they stuggle to pay for a house and to furnish it their tast only to have someone like you snatch it off them the day they retire.

This policy is worst than any policy thought up by M Thatcher or T. Blair.

I'm not suggesting their houses should be taken away. Where did I say that? On the other hand a few tweaks to the council tax to encourage a higher proportion of occupancy might be called for.

People are saying there aren't enough houses for the UK's young families. But if you look at the data, there is enough housing. So where is it all? I am trying to explain where all the housing supply has gone. There just won't be many grandchildren unless this problem gets sorted somehow.

If people want to hang on to these big houses, let them. I personally think many of them would be happier selling up. They would certainly have less heating bills, less council tax, less cleaning to do, and a better retirement income. Why not downsize from a 4-bed place with a large garden to a nice 2-bed place with a small garden?

The question is really, why aren't more of them selling up? When I think of my two sets of late grandparents (who really *did* work from age 14 unlike the baby boomers) they had an average of one spare bedroom per couple, both sets had a small garden of which I have many fond memories. That's how it used to be. When you got into your 50s and 60s and the kids are long gone you sold up and bought a nice bungalow with a garden. So why are today's retirees not doing this?

I think the answer to that is that they believe the value of the large house will continue to rise. Unfortunately, I think this hope will turn to disappointment for many. 2006 is the year when the oldest baby boomers (born 9 months after VE day) turn 60. Many baby boomers have poor pension provisions as you mention. So, to fund retirement, larger houses are going to come onto the market in bigger and bigger numbers over the next few years. The retirees that sell early will still be able to have a nice retirement. The ones that hang on will regret it because while they were spending time cleaning it, mowing the lawn and paying huge gas bills, the price was going down.

frugalista

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I think the answer to that is that they believe the value of the large house will continue to rise. Unfortunately, I think this hope will turn to disappointment for many. 2006 is the year when the oldest baby boomers (born 9 months after VE day) turn 60. Many baby boomers have poor pension provisions as you mention. So, to fund retirement, larger houses are going to come onto the market in bigger and bigger numbers over the next few years. The retirees that sell early will still be able to have a nice retirement. The ones that hang on will regret it because while they were spending time cleaning it, mowing the lawn and paying huge gas bills, the price was going down.

frugalista

that's another very good point. I think I might need to have another word with the folks, although it could well end in a blazing row with my mother berating me like that Padiham chap above :huh:

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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