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Cinnamon

Boarding Up Your Property As 'punishment' For Bad Tenants?

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"Eviction powers will be introduced to deal with occupants of "properties from hell", using current police powers to close and seal flats and houses that have been the scene of "persistent and serious nuisance" regardless of ownership. They will remain boarded up for at least three months."

Source: http://politics.guardian.co.uk/homeaffairs...1682962,00.html

If I understand this correctly, if you're renting out to the wrong kind of family, you get punished too?

Cinnamon

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Yup....I think it would be a last resort, ie if the landlord was failing to evict them despite constant breach. And I fully agree with it.

That is passing the buck to the Landlord, and IMHO unfairly, since those kind of people are difficult enough when being dealt with by professionals, who have the advantage of staying anonymous to some extent -- the tenants do not know where they live.

However, your tenants know where ->you<- live! (And also, what if you are not in the country? What if the estate agent looks after your property? So many ways this can backfire against someone innocent!)

Besides that, this constitutes 'communal punishment', where some innocent party is directly punished as a result of the actions of someone else.

I have no sympathy for people who make other people's lives a misery, but, at the same time, I think it is worrying that the government is not capable of writing logical, enforceable and fair laws any more. Surely, there must be a better way of doing this, other than the nuclear&braindead option?

Cinnamon

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I would need to read up more on this, to see the specifics. But I understand what you are saying, and its certainly a valid point. I suppose it depends on your view.....in my opinion, a landlord has to take some "social" responsibility, and act very quickly and proactively on bad tenants, even before any new law. I think this as for some of these people, the only thing that would encourage them to act better is the possibility of losing their home.

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I would need to read up more on this, to see the specifics. But I understand what you are saying, and its certainly a valid point. I suppose it depends on your view.....in my opinion, a landlord has to take some "social" responsibility, and act very quickly and proactively on bad tenants, even before any new law. I think this as for some of these people, the only thing that would encourage them to act better is the possibility of losing their home.

Does this social responsibility also extent to anyone else who is selling services to those families?

Would Tesco be liable to have their vehicle impounded for delivering food to them?

And why not also sue the EA, because they arranged for these people to move in? What about the maternity ward that delivered the children that are causing this trouble?

The labour idea that fixing the law's broken procedures by making kangaroo laws to hop around the obstacles that come with justice and due process is very dangerous.

We have good and proven laws, all we need to do it apply them and do so in a timely manner.

And, I ask, what happens when the new kangaroo courts get bogged down in the same way -- then they'll just collect the apparently offending people in a van and lock them up anyway?

Cinnamon

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There is a big difference between providing a problem family with somewhere to live, when that person has the power to do something about it, than delivering their food.

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There is a big difference between providing a problem family with somewhere to live, when that person has the power to do something about it, than delivering their food.

Well, what is the big difference?

Alcohol fuels their misdeeds and food sustains them -- whilst sobriety might make them model citizens, and starving them might make them move peacefully. I say selling them anything but gruel and Evian should be outlawed and punished severly. :ph34r:

So, how is providing an essential service different from providing another essential service?

And why is the house boarded up for a minimum of 3 month, regardless of who owns it? Consider that you might just want to relet it. Will you have recourse to suing the EA for compensation if they managed the property? How will you or the EA find out that this familiy is a problem, unless you frequently visit the house and talk to the neighbours? And who pays the council tax, and other possible damage that a building without heating can sustain in winter? And so on.

I'm amazed that people simply accept this as seen, sure ASBO families are not exactly lovable, nor are LL's but this is taking the 'someone must and will be liable' mania a step too far.

Cinnamon

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Cinnamon I'm not going to bother replying to your increasingly ridiculous argument about food/alcohol/providing housing.

It isn't about "blaming" the landlord, it is about a quick way of damage limitation to the surrounding families who's lives can be made a living hell by these people. Yes the landlord suffers, for a short time, but the good outweighs the bad....in much the same way that the banning of smoking in public places will obviously affect smokers in a bad way, but the general public benefit will be much greater.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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