Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
JBN QSPFSUXHVSV

Is Provision Of Private Rented Accomdation Wrong ?

Recommended Posts

Excellent site.

Just a general question ' topic which in a way covers many threads here e.g speculation,rental prices, MEW.

Do members think it is fundamentally wrong for private individual (e.g BTL landlords) or companies to provide rented accomodation ? e.g it should be banned.

If so why ?

Is provision of private rented accomondation automatically bad (as I see private landlords get quite a bit of stick here). Or is that a spin of from the private LL affect on HPI.

Should all rented accomondation be only allowed to be provided by the state or non profit organsations e.g housing associations ?

If so why ? Would they provide a better or fairer service than the private sector.

Are there moral or economic arguements for either positon. Could the current rental market situation be improved for everyone. How ?

Interested to hear peoples opinions and thoughts on whether private LL e.g BTL etc is fundamentally wrong.

JBN

Edited by JBN QSPFSUXHVSV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was told in germany rents are capped by the government, based on where you live, type of property and floor space. (perhaps i was miss informed can anyone confirm or deny?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My landlord works abroad, and so rents me his flat. I don't have a problem with that; when the interest on the mortgage to buy a similar place makes that the more sensible option, then I'll give him my notice. For the time being I get a reasonable deal. It's not his fault that house prices are so silly (as far as I know, anyway). The BTL speculators who jumped on the bandwagon recently are all going to get their fingers burnt, which is also fair enough :).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was told in germany rents are capped by the government, based on where you live, type of property and floor space. (perhaps i was miss informed can anyone confirm or deny?)

'tis true (as far as I am aware)

This is where the argument sometimes presented by LL about us moving towards a renting society because it works well in other countries falls down.

Countries that rely heavily on rented accomodation are heavily regulated and renting is a long term option. In germnay it is perfectly possible, and common for people to rent a flat/house, bring up their kids there and live there as long as they want.

We will never have a society that accepts renting over buying in the UK unless there is heavier regulation of the market.

In reply to the original thread - I don't think there is anything wrong with private landlords or renting privately. There is a need and a market for this.

What p1sses me off if when LL come onto this site trying to accuse anyone who isn't prepared to get themselves into huge debt on IO mortgages to rent property out in an already crowded market of being risk averse/moaners etc.

If someone wants to be a private landlord then good luck to them - but don't try and tell me that I will never be financially comfortable unless I go out tomorrow and buy an overpriced city centre flat on and IO mortgage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do members think it is fundamentally wrong for private individual (e.g BTL landlords) or companies to provide rented accommodation ? e.g it should be banned.

What an absurd notion.

Should all rented accomondation be only allowed to be provided by the state or non profit organsations e.g housing associations ?

Most recent BTL landlords are non-profit.

Could the current rental market situation be improved for everyone. How ?

Less regulation in general, but planning permission required for converting houses into flats and vice versa (the latter only to be granted if there is a clear surplus in the locality).

More secure Assured Shorthold Tenancy agreements with one and two year notice periods available.

Much greater promotion and use of the Residential Property Tribunal Service to settle disputes with a voluntary scheme that landlords can join that commits them to using the service in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20005

Yet another reference to the overpriced city center flats.

The housng world is larger dont cha know?

Yes I am fully aware that the housing world is larger than overpriced city centre flats - that is why in my post I stated that I have nothing against private landlords or private renting - just overpriced city centre flats.

latks - you seem to have a tendency to set up straw men only to knock them down. In my experience most people who do this either have difficulty communicating their argument or they are so wound up that they can no longer focus on the debate - they only hear what they expect to hear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neither.

You said "If someone wants to be a private landlord then good luck to them - but don't try and tell me that I will never be financially comfortable unless I go out tomorrow and buy an overpriced city centre flat on and IO mortgage"

If people on this site have purchased new builds then I am sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neither.

You said "If someone wants to be a private landlord then good luck to them - but don't try and tell me that I will never be financially comfortable unless I go out tomorrow and buy an overpriced city centre flat on and IO mortgage"

If people on this site have purchased new builds then I am sorry.

I also said

"In reply to the original thread - I don't think there is anything wrong with private landlords or renting privately. There is a need and a market for this."

So would it be reasonable to assume from your comments that you also agree that buying overpriced city centre flats as BTL in the current climate is foolish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also said

"In reply to the original thread - I don't think there is anything wrong with private landlords or renting privately. There is a need and a market for this."

So would it be reasonable to assume from your comments that you also agree that buying overpriced city centre flats as BTL in the current climate is foolish?

Nail & head collide ...........!

As per my pevious post elsewhere. CC2BNB have been a foolish venture since late 2003.

Is it cold or is it just me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Should all rented accomondation be only allowed to be provided by the state or non profit organsations e.g housing associations ?"

LOL :lol: can you imagine the number of homeless on the waiting list for a house?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nail & head collide ...........!

As per my pevious post elsewhere. CC2BNB have been a foolish venture since late 2003.

Is it cold or is it just me?

There you go again - setting up straw men.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent site.

Just a general question ' topic which in a way covers many threads here e.g speculation,rental prices, MEW.

Do members think it is fundamentally wrong for private individual (e.g BTL landlords) or companies to provide rented accomodation ? e.g it should be banned.

If so why ?

Is provision of private rented accomondation automatically bad (as I see private landlords get quite a bit of stick here). Or is that a spin of from the private LL affect on HPI.

Should all rented accomondation be only allowed to be provided by the state or non profit organsations e.g housing associations ?

If so why ? Would they provide a better or fairer service than the private sector.

Are there moral or economic arguements for either positon. Could the current rental market situation be improved for everyone. How ?

Interested to hear peoples opinions and thoughts on whether private LL e.g BTL etc is fundamentally wrong.

JBN

This is a great idea if you want to pay more rent and stifle the free movement of many people. Here in Sweden, rents are high even though the govt owns most of the rental stock. There is little competition and they have waiting lists for govt owned properties lasting up to 10 years to get the ideal rental place. ie get on the list today, expect to be able to move to your desired area & property size in 10 years.

Free competition is what drives prices down. Remove it & you'll pay. It's easy to imagine removing it when rental prices are low though isn't it? All communists are the same, they see short term benefits & have no idea how it might pan out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20005

Yet another reference to the overpriced city center flats.

The housng world is larger dont cha know?

IMHO its these largely BTL flats which will form a catalist for a wider correction in the market. Once the penny drops it will be a dominoe effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We need a plurality of housing choices. The free market only provides poor choice and high prices, with new building work targeted at speculators and swelling corporate coffers rather than real-world need.

With the near total removal of choice, much of the UK can not provide affordable housing, to rent or buy, to the people. Simple good budgeting suggests you shouldn't spend more than a third of your income in housing costs. For modest earners this is now impossible, even if you only want to live like a student in a shared house or live in a putrid HMO. Already, people on lower incomes are starting to share small rooms because, frankly, 400PCM is too much rent for millions of people.

In Hong Kong, the poor also live in shared rooms - often doubled up in bunk beds. The UK is only a stone's throw from this.

Under the present Thatcherite government half a million families live in temporary accomodation - essentially b&bs. No space for the kids, no security - it can only lead to educational underachievement, poor health and crime later on.

People's housing needs change. A young person in secure employment or making a great contribution to the world doesn't deserve slum living. More council housing is needed and some of this needs to be ring-fenced for working people, or those engaged in beneficial activities. Nowadays, people in need of social housing include graduates, solid full-time workers, etc. so there's no reason to think new forms of cheap housing will create social dumping grounds.

With more social housing of a good quality, the mortgage market can be re-regulated ending the 'anyone with a pulse' lending culture, which has pumped vast amounts of freshly-created money into the housing market causing such misery. People will be able to save meaningful deposits once more and move to their own private homes at reduced cost when they are ready and can truly afford to.

BTL-mortgages would be all but outlawed, as they seem to serve no valuable purpose other than introduced vast amounts of new money to inflate the price of the nation's housing stock and give wealth to one group at the direct expense of impoverishment to others. As 60% of the nation's money supply was created as mortgages, public works projects funded by publically-created credit (ie. interest free money) could be used to offset some of this loss. A greater supply of debt-free money and a reduction in debt money would be socially beneficial and put the brakes on the need for rampant inflation (ie. real inflation - increase in money supply) we have seen over the last few years.

Private housing co-ops and non-proffit associations could also be encouraged to provide yet another form of cheap housing and tax breaks offered, allowing groups of people to team up to create their own communities and help themselves. Unlike the big building firms, community-created housing would be based on real world need - places for relaxation, community spaces for recreation, adequate space, green areas, etc. - all the things currently denied to most people by the free market.

Edited by CrashedOutAndBurned

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem with private landlords, as long as it's against the background of a credit regime that doesn't lead to boom and bust. Ie one in which they're running a proper business with cash-flow that they pay tax on (on the profits, if any), and not one in which the "business model" is speculation on capital gains.

Noting that this shifts the responsibility from individuals to government, to set up and run the economy in a responsible way that creates a reasonably benign environment for the population generally; not an environment in which some people can use assets whose value has inflated hugely because of past economic mismanagement to leverage speculation that damages the economic environment for other groups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We need a plurality of housing choices. The free market only provides poor choice and high prices, with new building work targeted at speculators and swelling corporate coffers rather than real-world need.

With the near total removal of choice, much of the UK can not provide affordable housing, to rent or buy to, to the people. Simple good budgeting suggests you shouldn't spend more than a third of your income in housing costs. For modest earners this is now impossible, even if you only want to live like a student in a shared house or live in a putrid HMO. Already, people on lower incomes are starting to share small rooms because, frankly 400PCM is too much rent for a million of people.

In Hong Kong, the poor also live in shared rooms - often doubled up in bunk beds. The UK is only a stone's throw from this.

Under the present Thatcherite government half a million families live in temporary accomodation - essentially b&bs. No space for the kids, no security - it can only lead to educational underachievement, poor health and crime later on.

People's housing needs change. A young person in secure employment or making a great contribution to the world doesn't deserve slum living. More council housing is needed and some of this needs to be ring-fenced for working people, or those engaged in beneficial activities. Nowadays, people in need of social housing include graduates, solid full-time workers, etc. so there's no reason to think new forms of cheap housing will create social dumping grounds.

With more social housing of a good quality, the mortgage market can be re-regulated ending the 'anyone with a pulse' lending culture, which has pumped vast amounts of freshly-created money into the housing market causing such misery. People will be able to save meaningful deposits once more and move to their own private homes at reduced cost when they are ready and can truly afford to.

BTL-mortgages would be all but outlawed, as they seem to serve no valuable purpose other than introduced vast amounts of new money to inflate the price of the nation's housing stock and give wealth to one group at the direct expense of impoverishment to others. As 60% of the nation's money supply was created as mortgages, public works projects funded by publically-created credit (ie. interest free money) could be used to offset some of this loss. A greater supply of debt-free money and a reduction in debt money would be socially beneficial and put the brakes on the need for rampant inflation (ie. real inflation - increase in money supply) we have seen over the last few years.

Private housing co-ops and non-proffit associations could also be encouraged to provide yet another form of cheap housing and tax breaks offered, allowing groups of people to team up to create their own communities and help themselves. Unlike the big building firms, community-created housing would be based on real world need - places for relaxation, community spaces for recreation, adequate space, green areas, etc. - all the things currently denied to most people by the free market.

Hear,hear ( or is it here, here?)

<_<

Edited by murpaul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Private housing co-ops and non-proffit associations could also be encouraged to provide yet another form of cheap housing and tax breaks offered, allowing groups of people to team up to create their own communities and help themselves. Unlike the big building firms, community-created housing would be based on real world need - places for relaxation, community spaces for recreation, adequate space, green areas, etc. - all the things currently denied to most people by the free market.

well in theory its good. what will happen in reality is they will offer half purchases to workers. offering no benefit to saving money. and the wholly social rental homes will go to people who dont work as normal so they can trash them.

remember the system is there to create wealth for a few. not to provide social systems that dont produce a profit. those days are over when a government made policy for progress and not profit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with private individuals offering rentals IMO.

Only problem is if you are buying into it today you must be absolutely mental! :D:D:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Private housing co-ops and non-proffit associations could also be encouraged to provide yet another form of cheap housing and tax breaks offered, allowing groups of people to team up to create their own communities and help themselves. Unlike the big building firms, community-created housing would be based on real world need - places for relaxation, community spaces for recreation, adequate space, green areas, etc. - all the things currently denied to most people by the free market.

housing co-op

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.