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crashmonitor

Britain's Seaside Resorts In Ruins

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Seems the BBC are running a series on this from today. FWIW I take a bit of a nostalgia angle on this and I am quite fascinated by some of the faded heritage.

I was on the North West coast last weekend and it doesn't get much weirder than Ainsdale on Sea near Southport. basically the promendade was started in the late 1800s to rival nearby Southport and Blackpool but it stopped at the first six grand mansions that are now derelict. A lido was added later in the 20th century, now also abandoned. and you are left with a rather notorious Pontins behind the the abandoned promenade and the Sands hotel that though trading looks completely derelect on the first floor, ie. non residential.

There again for a region that gave us Blackpool, the Pendle witches, the dark satanic mills and the moors murders, nobody does weird like the North West.

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Seems the BBC are running a series on this from today. FWIW I take a bit of a nostalgia angle on this and I am quite fascinated by some of the faded heritage.

I was on the North West coast last weekend and it doesn't get much weirder than Ainsdale on Sea near Southport. basically the promendade was started in the late 1800s to rival nearby Southport and Blackpool but it stopped at the first six grand mansions that are now derelict. A lido was added later in the 20th century, now also abandoned. and you are left with a rather notorious Pontins behind the the abandoned promenade and the Sands hotel that though trading looks completely derelect on the first floor, ie. non residential.

There again for a region that gave us Blackpool, the Pendle witches, the dark satanic mills and the moors murders, nobody does weird like the North West.

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20150609-britains-seaside-ruins

Have you tried Brid?

All the things you listed still happen there.

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Seems the BBC are running a series on this from today. FWIW I take a bit of a nostalgia angle on this and I am quite fascinated by some of the faded heritage. I was on the North West coast last weekend and it doesn't get much weirder than Ainsdale on Sea near Southport. basically the promendade was started in the late 1800s to rival nearby Southport and Blackpool but it stopped at the first six grand mansions that are now derelict. A lido was added later in the 20th century, now also abandoned. and you are left with a rather notorious Pontins behind the the abandoned promenade and the Sands hotel that though trading looks completely derelect on the first floor, ie. non residential. There again for a region that gave us Blackpool, the Pendle witches, the dark satanic mills and the moors murders, nobody does weird like the North West.http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20150609-britains-seaside-ruins

The seaside towns that had any chance of surviving were those that did not solely rely on tourism. Take Whitby for example. Yes very touristy (too much so now). But had a thriving fishing fleet, a large farming population, various small manufacturing businesses and family run firms, such as a Local paper. As with the rest of the country, all of this was hollowed out, offshored, sold off and undermined by an influx of cheap labour. Anyone with the brains to make a difference got out as an existence of living hand to mouth on low paid, insecure and seasonal jobs is not particularly attractive.

The town is now in the position of falling school roles as the young people left, so that there are not enough kids for three secondary schools and one is likely to close. Never mind though as the empty properties are bought up by what the locals call 'white settlers' buying up the old, damp fisherman's cottages that could not be given away when I left school.

What this influx of second home owners has done is push the price of a home out of the reach of young people, thus pushing even more young into leaving. A town slowly dying as a direct result of successive government policies

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Most depressing holiday destination we've been on in the last 10 years has been Yarmouth. Crumbling and slowly decaying, with hardly a good meal to be had in the place. Even the fairground looked tired.

Whitby's our fave UK holiday destination. Lots of good places to eat and drink, and the place isn't slowly crumbling into the North Sea.

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Not all seaside towns in England are depressing and run down, very many are though......how can it be that France can invest in their coastal towns and we can't?.....just visited Brittany the difference is very noticeable.....is it something we can blame on the weather again?

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Not all seaside towns in England are depressing and run down, very many are though......how can it be that France can invest in their coastal towns and we can't?.....just visited Brittany the difference is very noticeable.....is it something we can blame on the weather again?

We don't "invest" in our seaside towns, we just send Londoners to buy second-homes and prop up the local economy there, like they are doing nationally.

Cases in point: Whitstable, Salcombe, St Ives, etc

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I used to live near Southport. I always remember when getting the bus there it would stop outside the Pontins.

One bus driver would stop, open the bus doors then say "anyone for Stalag 17?".

It was funnier when the odd elderly couple would stand up and sheepishly get off the bus with their heads down.

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We don't "invest" in our seaside towns, we just send Londoners to buy second-homes and prop up the local economy there, like they are doing nationally.

Cases in point: Whitstable, Salcombe, St Ives, etc

They are not propping up the economy if they only visit a few weeks a year.....empty homes do not encourage local prosperity.

How about good hotels, B&B and restaurants, good food, markets, arts and relaxing atmosphere......flowers in the streets and cleanliness, cared for roads and local public services.......one thing I noticed is the number of well cared for public toilets available and picnic areas, something small but shows pride the council have for the area...and all parking was free on street and public car parks.....

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Alnmouth is a nice wee coastal town that seems to do fine. Coldingham as well.

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They are not propping up the economy if they only visit a few weeks a year.....empty homes do not encourage local prosperity.

How about good hotels, B&B and restaurants, good food, markets, arts and relaxing atmosphere......flowers in the streets and cleanliness, cared for roads and local public services.......one thing I noticed is the number of well cared for public toilets available and picnic areas, something small but shows pride the council have for the area...and all parking was free on street and public car parks.....

Name one seaside town where that happens, that isn't propped up by London hpi money?

The inherent problem with seaside towns is they often don't have many jobs besides tourism, given their geographic location.

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Name one seaside town where that happens, that isn't propped up by London hpi money?

The inherent problem with seaside towns is they often don't have many jobs besides tourism, given their geographic location.

No, I was talking about the seaside towns I visited in France, just over the English Channel ..... what jobs do they have that we don't have? ;)

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Name one seaside town where that happens, that isn't propped up by London hpi money?

The inherent problem with seaside towns is they often don't have many jobs besides tourism, given their geographic location.

Alnmouth ? I have only been there once - but it was a lovely wee bustling place. Summer day and roasting of course helped - but still really nice.

I have no idea of who owns houses there though.

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The inherent problem with seaside towns is they often don't have many jobs besides tourism, given their geographic location.

See my earlier post. Some did and tourism was a secondary income source. Successive government's policies have removed the main income streams such as fishing, local small businesses, farming so that all that is left is selling off local property to white settlers, turning once independent and thriving communities into theme parks for the middle classes

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No, I was talking about the seaside towns I visited in France, just over the English Channel ..... what jobs do they have that we don't have? ;)

One thing they seem to have are independent shops such as butchers and bakers that have not been driven under by large supermarkets

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Most depressing holiday destination we've been on in the last 10 years has been Yarmouth. Crumbling and slowly decaying, with hardly a good meal to be had in the place. Even the fairground looked tired.

Yarmouth Fairground 1962...kids frolicking on a gleaming promenade. All we need now is the sequel Yarmouth 2016.

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Only a thought, but perhaps our business rate system has been very damaging in the past (due to change radically next year so smaller shops no longer pay)?

When the season is perhaps just 4 months long, very hard to pay the annual business rates, electricity etc., on top of the normal cost of buying stock, paying wages etc.

I know in Med countries the equivalent of business rates is tiny. However if they put tables/chairs on the terrace, they pay a substantial fee to the council - but only for each month they do this. So if their season is 5 months they only need to pay the terrace tax for 5 months.

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One thing they seem to have are independent shops such as butchers and bakers that have not been driven under by large supermarkets

Yes, saw lots of small traders, independent shops and businesses....did not see one chain company.....our towns sad to say are full of tired much of a muchness large corporate multi nationals..... :(

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Only a thought, but perhaps our business rate system has been very damaging in the past (due to change radically next year so smaller shops no longer pay)?

When the season is perhaps just 4 months long, very hard to pay the annual business rates, electricity etc., on top of the normal cost of buying stock, paying wages etc.

I know in Med countries the equivalent of business rates is tiny. However if they put tables/chairs on the terrace, they pay a substantial fee to the council - but only for each month they do this. So if their season is 5 months they only need to pay the terrace tax for 5 months.

I take your point and don't think that small businesses have been particularly helped by local councils. On top of the rates there is also parking. My home town has brought in residents parking only. Sounds great on the surface, but they have defined residents as those living right in the centre (mostly holiday homes). My home is a 20 minute walk into the centre but cannot park in the 'resident' part. There are many small villages in the surrounding countryside And people from these cannot park in the resident bit. So, it is all full up with holiday makers. The end result is that people shop elsewhere and the town us full of eateries, crap, sorry craft shops and charity shops.

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Yarmouth Fairground 1962...kids frolicking on a gleaming promenade. All we need now is the sequel Yarmouth 2016.

Great Yarmouth was my grandmother's favourite UK resort back in the 1960s.

A mate of mine who comes from the North West and is a bit of a connoisseur of run down urban areas rated Great Yarmouth one of the most depressing places he had ever visited when he went their recently.

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