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Theresa May Touches On Housing Crisis


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Of course rather than an Establishment stitch-up, there's also the fact that most Brexit leaders were disingenuous chancers or fringe loonies who have knifed each other, resigned, bottled it or switched their allegiance since the referendum.

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May was a Leaver.She was told to support remain,but not campaign,keep quiet.They wanted a leaver who looked like a slight remainer in case they got Brexit.

They can unite the party by the remain side thinking they have a leader who will water down Brexit,when in fact she was always a plant placed ready by the leave side.

Leadsom will of been told the same thing.She has played a blinder as well and done as she was told by the right.I expect now May will put her and Gove on the team to negotiate Brexit,to "unite" the party.

May was the leave plant and it has all gone to plan :ph34r:

That makes no sense, as much as I want it to be right. All the people backing May are Remainers, with exception to about 10. I'm not sure that if that was the ruse, the whole of Westminster wouldn't be privy to it.

http://www.stroudnewsandjournal.co.uk/resources/images/5233955.jpg?display=1&htype=0&type=responsive-gallery

Edited by spunko2010
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May was a Leaver.She was told to support remain,but not campaign,keep quiet.They wanted a leaver who looked like a slight remainer in case they got Brexit.

They can unite the party by the remain side thinking they have a leader who will water down Brexit,when in fact she was always a plant placed ready by the leave side.

Leadsom will of been told the same thing.She has played a blinder as well and done as she was told by the right.I expect now May will put her and Gove on the team to negotiate Brexit,to "unite" the party.

May was the leave plant and it has all gone to plan :ph34r:

So you're meant to trust someone who wont stand u[p to the establishment and support he believes.

Do me a f*8king favour. will you....

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May was a Leaver.She was told to support remain,but not campaign,keep quiet.They wanted a leaver who looked like a slight remainer in case they got Brexit.

They can unite the party by the remain side thinking they have a leader who will water down Brexit,when in fact she was always a plant placed ready by the leave side.

Leadsom will of been told the same thing.She has played a blinder as well and done as she was told by the right.I expect now May will put her and Gove on the team to negotiate Brexit,to "unite" the party.

May was the leave plant and it has all gone to plan :ph34r:

Interesting, but surely Gove is too toxic now? Although, the saying, '... keep your enemies closer.' just sprung to mind!

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Of course rather than an Establishment stitch-up, there's also the fact that most Brexit leaders were disingenuous chancers or fringe loonies who have knifed each other, resigned, bottled it or switched their allegiance since the referendum.

To be fair several Cabinet ministers on the remain side were almost certainly pro leave but thought remain was best for their career

It was the leave people who took a gamble and went against Cameron and Osborne.

As for housing the best ya to help young people is to allow a house price crash to occur. I doubt that will be her policy though. Just more platitudes and help to buy no doubt.

Edited by MARTINX9
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Theresa May has written an opinion piece in today's Times, including the following sentences on housing:

"Monetary policy, in the form of super-low interest rates and QE, has helped those on the property ladder at the expense of those who can't afford their own home."

She still refers to it as a property "ladder". If she calls it a pyramid then I might be interested.

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May's speech in Birmingham this morning is worth bookmarking. We'll see how she lives up to the promises.

Extract (but it's worth reading the whole thing):

"But today, I want to talk about my plans to reform the economy so that it really does work for everyone. Because it is apparent to anybody who is in touch with the real world that people do not feel our economy works that way at all. Talk to almost any ordinary member of the public, and the frustration they feel about the loss of control over their day-to-day lives is obvious.

"They are the ones who made real sacrifices after the financial crash in 2008. Some lost their jobs, some reduced their hours, others took a pay cut. Wages have grown, but only slowly. Taxes for the lowest paid went down, but other taxes, like VAT, went up. Fixed items of spending – like energy bills – have rocketed. Monetary policy – in the form of super-low interest rates and quantitative easing – has helped those on the property ladder at the expense of those who can’t afford to own their own home.

"There isn’t much job security out there. Some find themselves exploited by unscrupulous bosses. And, yes, some have found themselves out of work or on lower wages because of low-skilled immigration. It’s harder than ever for young people to buy their first house. There is a growing divide between a more prosperous older generation and a struggling younger generation. And there is a gaping chasm between wealthy London and the rest of the country.

"When you add all of these things up, the only surprise is that there is so much surprise in Westminster about the public’s appetite for change. And make no mistake, the referendum was a vote to leave the European Union, but it was also a vote for serious change.

"Yet so many of our political and business leaders have responded by showing that they still don’t get it. There are politicians – democratically-elected politicians – who seriously suggest that the Government should find a way of ignoring the referendum result and keeping Britain inside the European Union. And there are business leaders whose response has not been to plan for Britain’s departure or to think of the opportunities withdrawal presents – but to complain about the result and criticise the electorate.

"Well, I couldn’t be clearer. Brexit means Brexit. And we’re going to make a success of it. There will be no attempts to remain inside the EU, no attempts to rejoin it by the back door, and no second referendum. The country voted to leave the European Union, and as Prime Minister I will make sure that we leave the European Union."

http://www.theresa2016.co.uk/we_can_make_britain_a_country_that_works_for_everyone

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Theresa May has written an opinion piece in today's Times, including the following sentences on housing:

"Monetary policy, in the form of super-low interest rates and QE, has helped those on the property ladder at the expense of those who can't afford their own home."

...

"It's harder than ever for young people to buy their first house. There is a growing divide between a more prosperous older generation and a struggling younger generation. And there is a gaping chasm between London and the rest of the country."

Shame no mention of BTL but the above is encouraging

To BuyToLet VI and other HPI+++ mad-gainz VI; Sell on May and go away.

Although probably more schemes ahead. And prices are crazy in many non-London/SE parts as well.

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May Pledges Corporate Crackdown

Theresa May pledged to crack down on corporate irresponsibility if she succeeds David Cameron as prime minister. Shareholder votes on executive pay will become binding and companies will be required to have shareholders and workers represented on their boards in an effort to make big businesses more accountable.

Reminds me of Miliband (er ... who?)

To be fair, it's the kind of thing that could be done right-ish, or drowned in red tape.

TM is making a lot of progressive noises.

She's got form on not saying very much at all for a senior minister. Kind-of an opposite to the meeja personalities of the buffoon and the bulls***er. Guess that'll have to change now.

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City traders sense that a heavy fog is lifting...

City traders are pleased that at least some of the political uncertainty sitting over Britain like a heavy fog is lifting.

Connor Campbell of Spreadex explains:

Theresa May is clearly the market’s preferred choice for Britain’s top job, as evidenced by the reaction that greeted Leadsom’s stand-down statement.
May’s lack of interest in rushing to activate Article 50 and her relatively less contentious relationship with the EU when compared to her (now long gone) rivals
, as well as the general cheer at the mere fact of the UK once again having a PM, is arguably responsible for the rise from the FTSE and pound, both of which improved on their morning performances.

The former jumped by nearly 1%, sitting firmly at 2016 (and indeed 11 month) highs; the latter, meanwhile, managed to climb away from its earlier lows, even if the currency remains haunted by the spectre of a Bank of England rate cut on Thursday.
Edited by zugzwang
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May's speech in Birmingham this morning is worth bookmarking. We'll see how she lives up to the promises.

Extract (but it's worth reading the whole thing):

"But today, I want to talk about my plans to reform the economy so that it really does work for everyone. Because it is apparent to anybody who is in touch with the real world that people do not feel our economy works that way at all. Talk to almost any ordinary member of the public, and the frustration they feel about the loss of control over their day-to-day lives is obvious.

"They are the ones who made real sacrifices after the financial crash in 2008. Some lost their jobs, some reduced their hours, others took a pay cut. Wages have grown, but only slowly. Taxes for the lowest paid went down, but other taxes, like VAT, went up. Fixed items of spending – like energy bills – have rocketed. Monetary policy – in the form of super-low interest rates and quantitative easing – has helped those on the property ladder at the expense of those who can’t afford to own their own home.

"There isn’t much job security out there. Some find themselves exploited by unscrupulous bosses. And, yes, some have found themselves out of work or on lower wages because of low-skilled immigration. It’s harder than ever for young people to buy their first house. There is a growing divide between a more prosperous older generation and a struggling younger generation. And there is a gaping chasm between wealthy London and the rest of the country.

"When you add all of these things up, the only surprise is that there is so much surprise in Westminster about the public’s appetite for change. And make no mistake, the referendum was a vote to leave the European Union, but it was also a vote for serious change.

"Yet so many of our political and business leaders have responded by showing that they still don’t get it. There are politicians – democratically-elected politicians – who seriously suggest that the Government should find a way of ignoring the referendum result and keeping Britain inside the European Union. And there are business leaders whose response has not been to plan for Britain’s departure or to think of the opportunities withdrawal presents – but to complain about the result and criticise the electorate.

"Well, I couldn’t be clearer. Brexit means Brexit. And we’re going to make a success of it. There will be no attempts to remain inside the EU, no attempts to rejoin it by the back door, and no second referendum. The country voted to leave the European Union, and as Prime Minister I will make sure that we leave the European Union."

http://www.theresa2016.co.uk/we_can_make_britain_a_country_that_works_for_everyone

+1

Thanks for posting.

I think the grey vote is in for some 'greater good' persuasion as she garners support from generation rent.

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Theresa May has written an opinion piece in today's Times, including the following sentences on housing:

"Monetary policy, in the form of super-low interest rates and QE, has helped those on the property ladder at the expense of those who can't afford their own home."

...

"It's harder than ever for young people to buy their first house. There is a growing divide between a more prosperous older generation and a struggling younger generation. And there is a gaping chasm between London and the rest of the country."

Shame no mention of BTL but the above is encouraging

Still falling for what they say. My bet is more of the same.

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The gap between U40 wages and house prices is enormous. There would need to be an HPC of something like 70-80% in most of the country south of the Severn-Wash line and the richer cities in the North to get back to value. The banks could not survive that.

Maybe the Conservatives think they could live with a nice little 10-20% HPC. That would just take us back to 18 months ago when Generation Rent was just as priced out as it is now. Pointless.

I find it very hard to believe that a small 'c' conservative PM would have the stomach for what needs to happen. Theresa May is no radical.

My guess is that we will have a series of plate-spinning governments until either the post-1975 babies become demographically powerful enough to elect a radical government or high asset prices unravel in an uncontrolled way.

Edited by Dorkins
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May was a Leaver.She was told to support remain,but not campaign,keep quiet.They wanted a leaver who looked like a slight remainer in case they got Brexit.

They can unite the party by the remain side thinking they have a leader who will water down Brexit,when in fact she was always a plant placed ready by the leave side.

Leadsom will of been told the same thing.She has played a blinder as well and done as she was told by the right.I expect now May will put her and Gove on the team to negotiate Brexit,to "unite" the party.

May was the leave plant and it has all gone to plan :ph34r:

Are you taking the p!ss?

If not please explain

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I was wrong about Cameron, let's hope I was wrong about May too.

One thing I noticed today was when she was greeting her colleagues, most shook hands but David Davis gave her a big hug.

She is going to be our PM so I, for one, will give her the benefit of the doubt and wish her well.

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Dave gets one more appearance at PMQs.

Which is really a waste of time, what questions can he answer as he leaves office later that afternoon.

It will turn into a love Dave back slapping session with a few fark off and good riddance anecdotes from Corbyn and the SNP benches....

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I was wrong about Cameron, let's hope I was wrong about May too.

One thing I noticed today was when she was greeting her colleagues, most shook hands but David Davis gave her a big hug.

She is going to be our PM so I, for one, will give her the benefit of the doubt and wish her well.

Ch4 News speculating that David Davis will be Minister for Brexit.

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The gap between U40 wages and house prices is enormous. There would need to be an HPC of something like 70-80% in most of the country south of the Severn-Wash line and the richer cities in the North to get back to value. The banks could not survive that.

Maybe the Conservatives think they could live with a nice little 10-20% HPC. That would just take us back to 18 months ago when Generation Rent was just as priced out as it is now. Pointless.

I find it very hard to believe that a small 'c' conservative PM would have the stomach for what needs to happen. Theresa May is no radical.

My guess is that we will have a series of plate-spinning governments until either the post-1975 babies become demographically powerful enough to elect a radical government or high asset prices unravel in an uncontrolled way.

That's how I see it, and I seriously think while it's all well and nice chatting about how bad things are in the UK on this forum, with the implicit understanding things will get better, I don't believe they will. That 20% crash will materialise, and it certainly won't be enough for me. I definitely don't want to be on HPC.co.uk in 5 years' time saying the same old things. I am already emigrating......3 weeks and counting!!

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Which is really a waste of time, what questions can he answer as he leaves office later that afternoon.

It will turn into a love Dave back slapping session with a few fark off and good riddance anecdotes from Corbyn and the SNP benches....

It'll be a LibLabCon back slapping jolly fest (maybe not so much the Corbyn contingent). Likely across the house there'll hardly be a dry eye amongst all the mates.

Edited by billybong
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  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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