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Dave Beans

Interesting Geography

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It was probably my favourite subject at School, and in some respects it still is...Even when I was a wee nipper, I was spend hours "reading" an atlas...

For instance, if the Earth's landmass was inverted...

http://io9.gizmodo.com/what-earth-would-look-like-with-its-oceans-and-landmass-456387044

18hz7dc1nyuo7png.png

...and at night...

18hz7k2qikp36png.png

...or about a counter-counter enclave...It makes the residents virtual prisoners of their village as they can't get a passport to pass through the foreign country to get to their mother country...

http://www.cracked.com/article_19925_the-5-stupidest-things-ever-done-with-borders.html

136198_v1.jpg

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One of the things I find fascinating is the fact that plate tectonics wasn't widely accepted until the late 70s. My prof when I was doing my PhD had been a geology undergrad and he talked about his undergrad textbooks in the early 80s making no mention of plate tectonics, despite all the evidence being there.

The other thing I find interesting is how much geology has happened over the past 10,000 years or so that may form part of our cultural heritage (the great flood, atlantis etc.) that has essentially been lost to history. The human race has such a short memory.

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One of the things I find fascinating is the fact that plate tectonics wasn't widely accepted until the late 70s. My prof when I was doing my PhD had been a geology undergrad and he talked about his undergrad textbooks in the early 80s making no mention of plate tectonics, despite all the evidence being there.

The other thing I find interesting is how much geology has happened over the past 10,000 years or so that may form part of our cultural heritage (the great flood, atlantis etc.) that has essentially been lost to history. The human race has such a short memory.

Indeed. One of the reasons I am rather cynical when it comes to any 'proven' theory.

Just think - only about 18,000 years ago nearly all the uk was covered in ice. That's nuts to think about !!

But something I do agree with.

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If that stuff you're posting is true Beansy - then the Berlin Wall actually seems sensible in comparison.

Seems that as a rational man, I am compelled to investigate this "geography" witchcraft of yours somewhat further...

;)

XYY

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For anyone interested in tectonic plates you can go to Thingvellir Valley in Iceland and watch two major ones drift apart. Very slowly of course.[/size]

ITYM Þingvǫllr or Þingvellir. Been there, done that.

More interesting historically - as the site of Iceland's old democratic parliament - than geographically. The parliament that, for example, took the decision to join the EU of its time under speaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði, son of Þorkel, in 999/1000 A.D.

If you want to see tectonic drift (and lots of other exciting geography), there are places in Iceland where it's a whole lot clearer. And I don't just mean the freshly-erupted volcanos!

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Geography-wise I'm convinced that oxbow lakes only exist in school geography textbooks, I've never actually seen one (I'm probably going to get inundataed with links to maps and pictures showing them now).

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Geography-wise I'm convinced that oxbow lakes only exist in school geography textbooks, I've never actually seen one (I'm probably going to get inundataed with links to maps and pictures showing them now).

From Wikipedia

Notable examples

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I remember at age 7 in primary school spotting that South America and Africa must've been one land mass at one time, but deciding to wait till I grew up before I told anyone because grown-uips don't believe what children say!!!

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Not geography related per se, but it's an interesting mathematical fact that you can colour any concievable map with no countries of the same colour touching using only 4 colours.

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Not geography related per se, but it's an interesting mathematical fact that you can colour any concievable map with no countries of the same colour touching using only 4 colours.

That's because we live on a (near) sphere. You might need 7 colours on a torus.

Atlasses were easier, when everything was pink.

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I do get a strange pleasure though from reading contour maps and relating them to visible features to figure out where I am. It makes me feel very manly and useful and means I can tell Google to go fvck themselves :blink:

I recollect being mildly impressed seeing primary-age children out in groups doing just that.

Not geography related per se, but it's an interesting mathematical fact that you can colour any concievable map with no countries of the same colour touching using only 4 colours.

Subject to some assumptions - like the countries being simply connected. And of course ...

That's because we live on a (near) sphere. You might need 7 colours on a torus.

Atlasses were easier, when everything was pink.

Damn, you got there first.

But what you wrote is misleading: the word "near" is a complete red herring. It's a matter of topology, not geometry, let alone topography.

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I recollect being mildly impressed seeing primary-age children out in groups doing just that.

Subject to some assumptions - like the countries being simply connected. And of course ...

Damn, you got there first.

But what you wrote is misleading: the word "near" is a complete red herring. It's a matter of topology, not geometry, let alone topography.

I remember doing orienteering during some school away trip when I was 10...Don't know if its still done in schools. The geo-caching thing sees interesting..

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Indeed. One of the reasons I am rather cynical when it comes to any 'proven' theory.

Just think - only about 18,000 years ago nearly all the uk was covered in ice. That's nuts to think about !!

But something I do agree with.

And at others periods in relatively recent geological history it has been warm enough to have tropical seas and jungles at the poles... modern humans have just happened to have evolved in what is a particularly stable and benign period in terms of geology and climate, we're going to be in for a bit of a shock one day!

I suppose houseprices and the economy is like a micro-representation of this... people think that QE, ZIRP, HTB, PERMA-HPI etc is something that always has been and will always continue to be, again they'll be in for a bit of a shock one day!

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And at others periods in relatively recent geological history it has been warm enough to have tropical seas and jungles at the poles... modern humans have just happened to have evolved in what is a particularly stable and benign period in terms of geology and climate, we're going to be in for a bit of a shock one day!

I suppose houseprices and the economy is like a micro-representation of this... people think that QE, ZIRP, HTB, PERMA-HPI etc is something that always has been and will always continue to be, again they'll be in for a bit of a shock one day!

Especially if we return to being a big snowball

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150112-did-snowball-earth-make-animals

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Geography-wise I'm convinced that oxbow lakes only exist in school geography textbooks, I've never actually seen one (I'm probably going to get inundataed with links to maps and pictures showing them now).

An interesting one is Tunica Lake where prior to 1942 the lake was part of the river Mississippi. The state border between Arkansas and Mississippi still follows the old route of the river and so goes through the lake rather than following the river.

Many perfect ox bow lakes as you follow the Mississippi on googlemaps for example.

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An interesting one is Tunica Lake where prior to 1942 the lake was part of the river Mississippi. The state border between Arkansas and Mississippi still follows the old route of the river and so goes through the lake rather than following the river.

Many perfect ox bow lakes as you follow the Mississippi on googlemaps for example.

Oxtail lakes around here tend to be more areas of deep mud and grass/reeds with a volume of water that's far too sparse to swim in but leave you muddy to about the waist if you wade across on foot.

No wonder it's a soup.

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Un-interesting Geography.

The 12 Apostles in Australia.

After a several hour drive along the Great Ocean Road (which was great drive) I was amazed that the 12 Apostles (there are actually only 8 remaining) were such a promoted 'must see' tourist attraction - large visitor centre, helicopter rides, many buses turning up full of expectant japanese tourists... for what's (to me anyway) a bit 'meh' really.

1280px-The_Twelve_Apostles_2011.jpg

Nothing you can't see in countless locations along the coast of Blighty..

Maybe we're missing a trick?

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Not geography related per se, but it's an interesting mathematical fact that you can colour any concievable map with no countries of the same colour touching using only 4 colours.

Prove it :P

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