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Wto Trading Rules Apply For 2Yrs Upon Triggering Of Article 50


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How many people realised they where joining a sect.

What a tangled web of deceit the whole thing is.

...yes the EU is:

"Where but in the EU could a small-time politician with no particular talents, from a country the size of Surrey that thrives on unpaid taxes diverted from its fellow member states, have been given the presidency of a commission which — operating in total secrecy — oversees 28 countries (soon to be 27) of 500 million people?"

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-3667054/Still-sneering-Britain-boozy-bully-sums-s-rotten-EU.html?login#newcomment

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Thanks that confirms what i was saying in this thread.

We are looking at up to a decade on WTO trading terms after the (up to) 24months leaving negotiations are completed.

No wonder they stalled on Article 50

Also the story now doesnt add up that we are waiting until October to invoke article 50 so we have all our trade requirements laid out and ready to go.

There will be no trade talks during the 2yrs only leaving talks.

Trade talks formal or informal cannot happen whilst we are a still a member of the EU.

When are the Tabloids going to pick this up?

What is quite bizarre is why this wasn't picked up by the Remain camp - sure a lot of people would have not voted Leave if this was known. I suspect they didn't actually know themselves, considering what a shambles their campaign was.

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...yes the EU is:

"Where but in the EU could a small-time politician with no particular talents, from a country the size of Surrey that thrives on unpaid taxes diverted from its fellow member states, have been given the presidency of a commission which — operating in total secrecy — oversees 28 countries (soon to be 27) of 500 million people?"

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-3667054/Still-sneering-Britain-boozy-bully-sums-s-rotten-EU.html?login#newcomment

Thanks for the link.

Searched on the new, EU funded city, Belval, which has empty accommodation and wondered if this was being used for migrants...

But money isn’t everything. Luxembourg’s smallness is hobbling its response to Europe’s migration crisis and there is a fear among locals that its resources and its cultural identity will be swamped.
“We can’t really speak our mother tongue any more because most people here don’t understand it,” Wirion said, referring to Luxembourgisch, which shares official-language status with French and German. “Especially for older people, that creates a lot of anxiety — they can’t speak with their doctor in their own language — and that anxiety can seem like xenophobia.”
“My grandparents came to work,” said Claire, a 34-year-old woman of Portuguese descent taking a cigarette break outside a clothing store that she manages. “The people who are coming now don’t want to work. They just want to profit from the system,” she said, voicing particular concern about how the pension system will cope with the new arrivals.

http://www.politico.eu/article/luxembourg-migration-crisis-eu-asylum-refugees/ 09/15

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We all love buying European goods and services great wine and cheeses, cars, fruit and vegetables......if it all becomes too costly because of costs and tariffs we adapt...do it ourselves or try to. ;)

You forgot, there are two sides to every coin. Who in EU will need UK financial services and products?

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There is concern in the City that having to do business for years under WTO rules could be disastrous for the UK's service industries.

Under EU law, the bloc cannot negotiate a separate trade deal with one of its own members, hence the commissioner's insistence that the UK must first leave.

It is also against EU law for a member to negotiate its own trade deals with outsiders, which means the UK cannot start doing this until after it has left the EU.

Taken at face value, these rules mean the UK cannot conduct its own trade talks for up to two years - a fearsome challenge to any prime minister trying to deliver Brexit.

EU officials say the UK's options will soon refine themselves into a Norway-style package that keeps Britain within the single market - subject to EU rules and regulations - or a bespoke "third

country" deal on the pattern of Canada's.

They agree that because British businesses are already compliant with EU rules and regulations, choosing to remain within the single market would be "a little quicker", than negotiating a deal like Canada's.

But even a Norway-style single market access deal, they caution, could take years to negotiate, leaving the UK trading on WTO terms in the meantime.

Laws are made to be broken and they are only broken if caught and proven so how the hell could they prove the part in bold

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Laws are made to be broken and they are only broken if caught and proven so how the hell could they prove the part in bold

Because a British delegation / negotiating team arriving in various countries for trade talks is not going to go unnoticed.

As well as all the diplomacy "British Integrity" "World Stage" etc etc

We will follow the rules i expect.

Edited by workingpoor
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Completely agree..

The ideal (and if May really meant what she said in her speech the other day,the plan) is to aim for something more like the Canadian / Korean trade arrangement.

The trade off is that we could be on WTO terms for a long time while the details are negotiated, where as a Norway style model is a "quick fix" on significantly worse terms. Europe would undoubtably be angling for the latter because that best suits them, the question is how much business would we hemorrhage in the interim period if we hold out for the former. It would probably be worth it.. but a painful exercise for a few years unless European industry really does light a fire up their leaders bums to push it through quickly..

Completely agree..

The ideal (and if May really meant what she said in her speech the other day,the plan) is to aim for something more like the Canadian / Korean trade arrangement.

The trade off is that we could be on WTO terms for a long time while the details are negotiated, where as a Norway style model is a "quick fix" on significantly worse terms. Europe would undoubtably be angling for the latter because that best suits them, the question is how much business would we hemorrhage in the interim period if we hold out for the former. It would probably be worth it.. but a painful exercise for a few years unless European industry really does light a fire up their leaders bums to push it through quickly..

WTO would be devastating to the German car industries,then ramp up the pressure by doing a tariff free deal with Korea/Japan/Usa when it come to cars

From what i know of the EU, what Germany wants it gets and like you said there is the little matter of emissions ..and that would also apply to the French manufactures as they are almost certainly been up to the same

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You forgot, there are two sides to every coin. Who in EU will need UK financial services and products?

Well if that was a major potential problem, should not the remainers haven't made it far more clearer..... nothing of major importance was ever explained they tried to win votes on fear and lies...what is done is done....time to move forwards and upwards by creating something good that is worth the world buying.;)

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WTO would be devastating to the German car industries,then ramp up the pressure by doing a tariff free deal with Korea/Japan/Usa when it come to cars

From what i know of the EU, what Germany wants it gets and like you said there is the little matter of emissions ..and that would also apply to the French manufactures as they are almost certainly been up to the same

Renault-Nissan might have something to say about that. Are MINI still using the PSA HDi engine, if so they might have something to say.

Also, don't forget the German motor industry employees a fair few people in Crewe, Goodwood, Oxford, Swindon and Hams Hall.

Then there's the supply chain...

Governments will be lent on by industry* like you wouldn't believe. The UK civil service is going to be drowning in the negotiations, paperwork and legislation associated with leaving, so might not even have the resources to deal with trade negotiations.

Realpolitik https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realpolitik learn the word if you don't already know it. Because that's what we're going to see over the next two+ years, there will be a lot of huffing and puffing in public from the likes of Juncker and Schulz, but what goes on behind the scenes is another matter altogether.

*Oh and be sure that some of that leaning will involve British based companies wanting easy access to migrant labour.

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Because a British delegation / negotiating team arriving in various countries for trade talks is not going to go unnoticed.

As well as all the diplomacy "British Integrity" "World Stage" etc etc

We will follow the rules i expect.

Don't be silly, the only talks/negotiations that don't go unnoticed are the ones that are deliberately so. It's inconceivable that they aren't/won't be taking place.

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From the article:

It is also against EU law for a member to negotiate its own trade deals with outsiders, which means the UK cannot start doing this until after it has left the EU.

The article says we cannot informally discuss trade deals with extra-eu countries prior to leaving the EU? Where?

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The article says we cannot informally discuss trade deals with extra-eu countries prior to leaving the EU? Where?

In the quote above which is from the article.

Of course you always find those who think the rules / laws don't apply to them, those types are everywhere, they usually get a rude awakening.

EU member States are not allowed to negotiate seperate trade deals with other countries, Eurozone trading block rules must be used.

Edited by workingpoor
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UK trade with the EU

More than half of the UK’s total trade could be subject to new tariffs if we exit the EU, as we would no longer be part of the EU’s free trade agreement.

Final-UK-EU-trade-1024x543.png

As a non-member the UK would lose its automatic access to the EU’s Single Market of over 500 million consumers. Non-EU countries are required to pay for access and to follow regulations over which they have no control. Once the UK has left the EU (which it will have up to two years to do) it will have to negotiate a new trading relationship with both the EU and all of the EU’s current trading partners. In total the UK will need to renegotiate about 60 different trade deals so this process is expected to take around decade.

12814745_1109517329088590_75785430251327

It is clear that the EU will have a significant advantage in any negotiations to regain access to the Single Market, as the UK accounts for only 13% of the EU’s total trade, whereas the EU is the UK’s largest trading partner, responsible for 52% of all UK trade.

In addition much of the UK’s service sector, accounting for 78% of the UK economy, relies on unfettered access to the single market in order to operate. This is not something which is included in regular trade deals.

Typical dodgy Remain nonsense.

To be clear, the UK imports more from Europe than it exports. Therefore Europe is the loser if it imposes tariffs.

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In the quote above which is from the article.

Of course you always find those who think the rules / laws don't apply to them, those types are everywhere, they usually get a rude awakening.

EU member States are not allowed to negotiate seperate trade deals with other countries, Eurozone trading block rules must be used.

No it doesn't say that at all.

It does not rule out informal discussions for trade deals in the future post EU-departure

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No it doesn't say that at all.

It does not rule out informal discussions for trade deals in the future post EU-departure

But it does quite clearly rule out any trade negotiations with other countries whilst still a member of the EU.

The other country must negotiate with the Block (EU)

Edited by workingpoor
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But it does quite clearly rule out any trade negotiations with other countries whilst still a member of the EU.

The other country must negotiate with the Block (EU)

Quite. Define trade negotiations.

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Let's see, it's simple really. We all had a vote, everyone had their chance to tick a box and those that did, mostly voted exit. Sign the exit papers or there will be blood on the streets, simple fact of life. I still remember mag and the pole tax riots.

Something like, Mark Twain comes to mind, as like guns, if voting meant anything, it would be banned.

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Well if that was a major potential problem, should not the remainers haven't made it far more clearer..... nothing of major importance was ever explained they tried to win votes on fear and lies...what is done is done....time to move forwards and upwards by creating something good that is worth the world buying. ;)

How more clearer could they have put it? The weren't telling lies, losing access to the single market will be castrostrophic for the UK economy.

Which is why Boris ran away. Deliverering an exit from the EU, without free movement, on terms that will be acceptable will be impossible.

Edited by Peter Hun
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Typical dodgy Remain nonsense.

To be clear, the UK imports more from Europe than it exports. Therefore Europe is the loser if it imposes tariffs.

In Goods.

Uk exports more Services than its imports from the EU/EEA. Services can and will move to the EU to avoid tariffs.

Goods are more difficult to relocate, so the jobs won't come here.

Sign the exit papers or there will be blood on the streets, simple fact of life.

It will wash off. You don't think the people won't defend themselves?

Just remember, the referendum isn't binding, final or the law.

Edited by Peter Hun
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Renault-Nissan might have something to say about that. Are MINI still using the PSA HDi engine, if so they might have something to say.

Also, don't forget the German motor industry employees a fair few people in Crewe, Goodwood, Oxford, Swindon and Hams Hall.

Then there's the supply chain...

Governments will be lent on by industry* like you wouldn't believe. The UK civil service is going to be drowning in the negotiations, paperwork and legislation associated with leaving, so might not even have the resources to deal with trade negotiations.

Realpolitik https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realpolitik learn the word if you don't already know it. Because that's what we're going to see over the next two+ years, there will be a lot of huffing and puffing in public from the likes of Juncker and Schulz, but what goes on behind the scenes is another matter altogether.

*Oh and be sure that some of that leaning will involve British based companies wanting easy access to migrant labour.

On the Renault /Peugeot connection they would be in the same boat paying tariffs on their products that Mini /Nissan use coming to the UK ..just like BMW/ VAG group/ MERC would pay on cars, the UK is their largest single market ,,,what the Germans want the Germans get ..the question is will they cut their nose off to spite their face

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Because a British delegation / negotiating team arriving in various countries for trade talks is not going to go unnoticed.

As well as all the diplomacy "British Integrity" "World Stage" etc etc

We will follow the rules i expect.

Seems a bit 007 to me

What if they came here or met on the Turk`s and Caicos Islands or some other obscure British territory

No one will follow the rules if they can get away with it

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In Goods.

Uk exports more Services than its imports from the EU/EEA. Services can and will move to the EU to avoid tariffs.

Goods are more difficult to relocate, so the jobs won't come here.

It will wash off. You don't think the people won't defend themselves?

Just remember, the referendum isn't binding, final or the law.

And the banks have been threatening to leave for years yet they are still here

They stay because of the protection the "city of London" offers them and that protection will be far greater out off the clutches of the EU (personally i see this as a major downside of leaving but you have to make sacrifices)

There will be losses but there will be gains to offset them some see a glass half empty some see it half full ...only time will prove which is right just like the doom and gloom of the stock-market crashing last Friday and Monday soon past ...not a peep from the remain camp on that one in the last few days yet the sky was falling in on the weekend

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i

How more clearer could they have put it? The weren't telling lies, losing access to the single market will be castrostrophic for the UK economy.

Which is why Boris ran away. Deliverering an exit from the EU, without free movement, on terms that will be acceptable will be impossible.

Then we will tell them to get stuffed and charge a tarriff on our imports from them.
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