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Articles 49 & 50 Of The Lisbon Treaty

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Remain argued that if we left the EU, we would never be able to rejoin. In fact, Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon provides for a member state to rejoin by following Article 49.

Article 50

1. Any Member State may decide to withdraw from the Union in accordance with its own

constitutional requirements.

2. A Member State which decides to withdraw shall notify the European Council of its intention.

In the light of the guidelines provided by the European Council, the Union shall negotiate and conclude

an agreement with that State, setting out the arrangements for its withdrawal, taking account of the

framework for its future relationship with the Union. That agreement shall be negotiated in accordance

with Article 218(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. It shall be concluded on

behalf of the Union by the Council, acting by a qualified majority, after obtaining the consent of the

European Parliament.

3. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the State in question from the date of entry into force of the

withdrawal agreement or, failing that, two years after the notification referred to in paragraph 2, unless

the European Council, in agreement with the Member State concerned, unanimously decides to extend

this period.

4. For the purposes of paragraphs 2 and 3, the member of the European Council or of the Council

representing the withdrawing Member State shall not participate in the discussions of the European

Council or Council or in decisions concerning it.

A qualified majority shall be defined in accordance with Article 238(3)( B ) of the Treaty on the

Functioning of the European Union.

5. If a State which has withdrawn from the Union asks to rejoin, its request shall be subject to the

procedure referred to in Article 49.

Article 49 covers the application for joining, (or-re-joining) the EU

Article 49

(ex Article 49 TEU)

Any European State which respects the values referred to in Article 2 and is committed to promoting

them may apply to become a member of the Union. The European Parliament and national

Parliaments shall be notified of this application. The applicant State shall address its application to the

Council, which shall act unanimously after consulting the Commission and after receiving the consent

of the European Parliament, which shall act by a majority of its component members. The conditions

of eligibility agreed upon by the European Council shall be taken into account.

The conditions of admission and the adjustments to the Treaties on which the Union is founded, which

such admission entails, shall be the subject of an agreement between the Member States and the

applicant State. This agreement shall be submitted for ratification by all the contracting States in

accordance with their respective constitutional requirements.

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Remain argued that if we left the EU, we would never be able to rejoin. In fact, Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon provides for a member state to rejoin by following Article 49.

Article 49 covers the application for joining, (or-re-joining) the EU

But it requires unanimity so any country could veto us. After we've dicked them around once they won't let us back for a long time.

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But it requires unanimity so any country could veto us. After we've dicked them around once they won't let us back for a long time.

They're letting Turkey in. They'll let anyone in.

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But it requires unanimity so any country could veto us. After we've dicked them around once they won't let us back for a long time.

That is also true for any country joining for the first time. But there is a formal legal way to rejoin, that is my point. That we would be not allowed back in is technically an assumption, not a hard fact.

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That is also true for any country joining for the first time. But there is a formal legal way to rejoin, that is my point. That we would be not allowed back in is technically an assumption, not a hard fact.

Then you're being extremely pedantic to call that a lie. It would be politically inconceivable for a very long time for us to reapply once we were fully out.

So far there's still a big question mark about what arrangement we'll end up with and it could be that we won't leave at all.

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But it requires unanimity so any country could veto us. After we've dicked them around once they won't let us back for a long time.

They would...seeing how much we contribute to the EU budget...

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I think what they mean is "We wouldnt be able to rejoin under the same conditions"

So we would lose all the opt outs and concessions that Thatcher and others have negotiated in the past and we would be forced to join the Euro from day one. If put to a referendum I don't think many people would vote for abandoning the pound and accepting such a crap deal - so it will never happen.

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To be fair, by the time things might have cooled down enough for us to reconsider joining, the EU won't exist.

The EU might just survive the UK leaving, but if a second state were to leave it would be game over. A leaving state would likely be one of the other net contributors to the EU purse.

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To be fair, by the time things might have cooled down enough for us to reconsider joining, the EU won't exist.

The EU might just survive the UK leaving, but if a second state were to leave it would be game over. A leaving state would likely be one of the other net contributors to the EU purse.

Are any other EU countries crying for a referendum to leave yet?

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Are any other EU countries crying for a referendum to leave yet?

Mme. Le Pen in France in particular.

Even if she lost, I think it would heighten divisions within France that could turn nasty.

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So far there's still a big question mark about what arrangement we'll end up with and it could be that we won't leave at all.

This has been raised a few times.. I can't decide whether it would be good or not.

On one hand, my biggest concern about staying in was that nothing in the EU would change and everything would just go back to business as normal the next day.

The prospect of a Brexit has visibly shaken them and I imagine whatever happens now there'll be some serious soul searching in Brussels.

I wonder if the Brexit vote could still have been the best outcome overal whichever camp you are in?

If we do a massive U-turn and stay in, it may become a better EU than if we had just rolled over because of the above.

On the other hand, if we leave, the rest of Europe can get on with federalisation, joint military, closer integration and all the other things that we've been partly responsible for holding them back from. Perhaps down the line we will see what that really looks like and decide again whether it is something we would rather be part of.

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It's even more complex than that - Article 50 is astoundingly vague given the EUs penchant for complex legalities. There's nothing to stop you withdrawing your intention to leave (nothing permitting it either, which is exactly my point), nor is there anything stopping you submitting an application to join whilst negotiating your exit. Given the outrageous legal and practical complexities that are to be overcome, to me there is only one option that will suit all parties within the given timeframe - join EFTA. This would amount to a rejection of the Lisbon treaty (leaving us to negotiate bilaterally with whoever we like, rather than being represented by the EU), and would IMO be a great result.

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This has been raised a few times.. I can't decide whether it would be good or not.

Well for a start it would require rejection of a clear mandate to leave, in a Government initiated referendum, even though it is not binding on the Government. That would be outrageous in a nation that purports to be democratic and would have serious implications far beyond the issue of EU membership. I seriously think there would be blood on the streets and it would hand a propaganda prize to extreme right-wing factions.

The Government in it's present rudderless state would fall, and with Corbyn in a mess there is no effective opposition. Right wing (and left wing) groups could stir up violence. I never thought I would say this, but it is not beyond the realms of possibility they would have to declare martial law - and that might, ironically, mean expulsion from the EU.

A military coup would mean automatic expulsion from the EU; not so sure about martial law.

I have never lived through times like this in the UK before. The nearest to it I have seen is martial law in Greece and in Turkey.

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It's even more complex than that - Article 50 is astoundingly vague given the EUs penchant for complex legalities. There's nothing to stop you withdrawing your intention to leave (nothing permitting it either, which is exactly my point), nor is there anything stopping you submitting an application to join whilst negotiating your exit. Given the outrageous legal and practical complexities that are to be overcome, to me there is only one option that will suit all parties within the given timeframe - join EFTA. This would amount to a rejection of the Lisbon treaty (leaving us to negotiate bilaterally with whoever we like, rather than being represented by the EU), and would IMO be a great result.

I would be keen to join EFTA - its essentially what we left when we joined the Common Market, but paradoxically is probably the nearest thing we now have to the Common Market, as the EEC has morphed into a very different EU now.

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I would be keen to join EFTA - its essentially what we left when we joined the Common Market, but paradoxically is probably the nearest thing we now have to the Common Market, as the EEC has morphed into a very different EU now.

Indeed. If the referendum question was a choice between staying in the EU or joining EFTA then EFTA would have won by a landslide.

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....

On the other hand, if we leave, the rest of Europe can get on with federalisation, joint military, closer integration and all the other things that we've been partly responsible for holding them back from. Perhaps down the line we will see what that really looks like and decide again whether it is something we would rather be part of.

That's why they don't want us in. Yes we pay the bills and follow their rules, but we were never really 'in'. This is it for them now, all or nothing. I'm expecting massive change in the EU. Full on acceleration of the federal state. EU army, EU police, turkey, EU tax codes, TTIP. It will be a disaster for anybody still in it.

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This has been raised a few times.. I can't decide whether it would be good or not.

On one hand, my biggest concern about staying in was that nothing in the EU would change and everything would just go back to business as normal the next day.

The prospect of a Brexit has visibly shaken them and I imagine whatever happens now there'll be some serious soul searching in Brussels.

I wonder if the Brexit vote could still have been the best outcome overal whichever camp you are in?

If we do a massive U-turn and stay in, it may become a better EU than if we had just rolled over because of the above.

On the other hand, if we leave, the rest of Europe can get on with federalisation, joint military, closer integration and all the other things that we've been partly responsible for holding them back from. Perhaps down the line we will see what that really looks like and decide again whether it is something we would rather be part of.

Shaking the EU up enough that it reforms itself and drops its federal and expansionist plans but not actually leaving would be the ideal result - it's getting rid of a large chunk of what was so rotten with it that I wanted to leave. It doesn't affect the internal migration biggy but without expansion that will probably settle down (in a very, very long time), and the amount of interference in domestic affairs would still be too high, but fixing all of the EU's flaws is too much to hope for. So it would be an ideal result - except for the biggy of having ignored a referendum and the consequences of that. But what else would've shaken it enough?

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That's why they don't want us in. Yes we pay the bills and follow their rules, but we were never really 'in'. This is it for them now, all or nothing. I'm expecting massive change in the EU. Full on acceleration of the federal state. EU army, EU police, turkey, EU tax codes, TTIP. It will be a disaster for anybody still in it.

The more they go down that path the more likely it is that we won't be the last to leave. Britain might've been the least keen on that abomination but it's certainly not universally supported elsewhere.

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Indeed. If the referendum question was a choice between staying in the EU or joining EFTA then EFTA would have won by a landslide.

How? Then it would have been explicit that there would be no real change to immigration.

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Indeed. If the referendum question was a choice between staying in the EU or joining EFTA then EFTA would have won by a landslide.

Perhaps, but more complicated to sell. And a Remain/EFTA/Leave 3-way vote would split the Leave vote. I feel the 3-way AV referendum worked against PR in a similar way.

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Then you're being extremely pedantic to call that a lie. It would be politically inconceivable for a very long time for us to reapply once we were fully out.

So far there's still a big question mark about what arrangement we'll end up with and it could be that we won't leave at all.

I'm pedantic. ?

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