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27.8% Of The Country Did Not Vote, Can Anyone Really Claim Consensus?

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The results for the referendum officially are given as:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/politics/eu_referendum/results

Leave
Vote share
51.9%
Votes 17,410,742 Votes
Remain
Vote share
48.1%
Votes 16,141,241 Votes
However if you analyse the full vote
Leave 37.4%
Remain 34.7%
Did not vote 27.8%
Ultimately there is no consensus, nearly 13m for what ever reason offered no opinion. It's very dangerous to assume that those who did not vote are happy with the result. Yes they should have voted, but it's a substantial number to have sat on the side lines.
It's a huge hole and certainly I don't think Boris is really a man who can unite a disunited kingdom. In fact I can't think of one career politician who can step up to the plate.

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democracy in action.

what has consensus to do with it?

Why are the remain campaign still fearmongering?..It is they being divisive and hateful right now...something they claimed the leave campaign was responsible for...and of course, in the SJW mind, simply being allowed to vote against is a microagression against them, and they want to return to their safe space....which of course, the leavers have invaded somehow.

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Yes, because they had the chance but decided not to go to the polls - that is an abstain vote.

Exactly, in a binary referendum not turning up half a vote for each side.

Its like the trolley conumdrum

The action / inaction part is irrelevant. Deciding on action vs inaction is a vote, choosing not to turn up at polling station or posting the letter is a vote.

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That's true of every vote ever.

If all the non-voters in the 2015 general election had all voted for one party, any party, that party would have had the most votes. Can you say therefore that the last GE was invalid? Can you argue that actually the Christian People's Alliance (3260 votes) won it because all the people who didn't vote wanted them to win really?

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Admit it IRRO, you voted remain.

Nope, I voted leave. I wasn't being asked the question which I wanted which was to reject both EU treaties. If I voted remain I felt I'd be implying that I gave my consent to these treaties which I didn't.

Looking at the political map, I'm sure no one really wants this poison chalice.

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I read an article many years ago in New Scientist in which it was demonstrated that all voting systems are illegitimate in some way.

However, I voted out and I'm left uneasy at us making such a large decision on such a wafer thin majority. In fact the biggest negative of the entire referendum has been the split it has revealed in the country. The UK isn't a pleasant place right now. Too much mid-slinging going on.

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The results for the referendum officially are given as:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/politics/eu_referendum/results

Leave
Vote share
51.9%
Votes 17,410,742 Votes
Remain
Vote share
48.1%
Votes 16,141,241 Votes
However if you analyse the full vote
Leave 37.4%
Remain 34.7%
Did not vote 27.8%
Ultimately there is no consensus, nearly 13m for what ever reason offered no opinion. It's very dangerous to assume that those who did not vote are happy with the result. Yes they should have voted, but it's a substantial number to have sat on the side lines.
It's a huge hole and certainly I don't think Boris is really a man who can unite a disunited kingdom. In fact I can't think of one career politician who can step up to the plate.

They were stuck at a railway station waiting for Southern Railway train to turn up ?

Anyway their voting intentions are simply ''unknown'.

Clearly if Remain's case was more convincing they would have turned up to vote for them but as they did not they presumably simply could not be a*sed about the result

These are all pretty desperate arguments as far as I can see.

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I read an article many years ago in New Scientist in which it was demonstrated that all voting systems are illegitimate in some way.

However, I voted out and I'm left uneasy at us making such a large decision on such a wafer thin majority. In fact the biggest negative of the entire referendum has been the split it has revealed in the country. The UK isn't a pleasant place right now. Too much mid-slinging going on.

The split was there anyway. The referendum might have brought it to the surface but it didn't create it, a point those who lament it and blame the referendum for "creating" completely miss. You don't solve problems by keeping quiet about them.

About the numbers, I can understand not voting in a general election, where the choice is usually between Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny (although a spoilt ballot is a better option), not in this though unless you simply couldn't care less either way.

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The split was there anyway. The referendum might have brought it to the surface but it didn't create it, a point those who lament it and blame the referendum for "creating" completely miss. You don't solve problems by keeping quiet about them.

About the numbers, I can understand not voting in a general election, where the choice is usually between Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny (although a spoilt ballot is a better option), not in this though unless you simply couldn't care less either way.

True, and as I've mentioned to others in my social circle, the finger has to be pointed at the politicians who have fought so many for so long. It didn't have to end like this. The 52% just wanted to be listened to, not patronised and aggressively shouted down.

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Right at the beginning of the coverage of the result, they announced with shock that the turnout on the council estates across the country was as high as 80% which betrayed the eventual result.

These people had always been written off as lazy, good for nothings who couldn't be bothered voting. No, it was that they were in unpopular ultra safe FPTP Labour constituencies that took them for granted.

Yes I saw that, you could see it was causing sheer panic. I'm guessing they suddenly realised that leave might have won. These area's have been written off and Labour doesn't care now about it's heartland and just patronises them. Even Labour doesn't want to engage with its traditional supporters.

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Yes I saw that, you could see it was causing sheer panic. I'm guessing they suddenly realised that leave might have won. These area's have been written off and Labour doesn't care now about it's heartland and just patronises them. Even Labour doesn't want to engage with its traditional supporters.

They take private polls so they would have known Leave were ahead for ages

Everything imaginable was gerrymandered to help Remain win including

- non stop bias broadcast in favour of Remain by the BBC and other media

- changes in the way the electoral list was compiled

- registerng non eligible voters

- employers writing threatening letters to staff

They even gave Remain not Leave the favoured the top option on the ballot paper (contrary to the normal alphabetic ordering used in elections).

They tried to fix the result every way they knew how and they still f*cking lost

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Im still waiting for a "young" person to tell me what exactly they feel they have lost due to this result.

Gal on Sky News last night working as a barrista in Hackney, saying that she didnt understand how we could have voted the way we did, and she was "highly educated".

But seemingly not educated enough to question why she's likely paying 3/4 of her wage for a double room in Dalston.

They've been brainwashed.

It's the only conclusion i can draw.

Poor effort "young people", really ******ing poor.

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I would say the fact that over 70% voted was historically very high.

Brexit were originally hoping for a low turn out and there supports devotion to the cause doing it for them.

The fact that they were able to do it with over 70% turn out, the Jo Cox murder (must have taken a couple of percent off) and employers writing to their employees to vote in or else, show that Brexit has a very strong mandate, whatever those annoying couple of friends on Facebook are saying.

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Right at the beginning of the coverage of the result, they announced with shock that the turnout on the council estates across the country was as high as 80% which betrayed the eventual result.

These people had always been written off as lazy, good for nothings who couldn't be bothered voting. No, it was that they were in unpopular ultra safe FPTP Labour constituencies that took them for granted.

This. Out of my friends, it is the ones from a more privileged background there are whining.

People with cushy jobs not highly affected by EU emigration that live in twee 95% white British (and 99% white) villages cannot understand why anyone would be against the lovely EU

Probably worried they might have to now interact with a member of the British working class rather than that nice Polish plumber!

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I would say the fact that over 70% voted was historically very high.

Brexit were originally hoping for a low turn out and there supports devotion to the cause doing it for them.

The fact that they were able to do it with over 70% turn out, the Jo Cox murder (must have taken a couple of percent off) and employers writing to their employees to vote in or else, show that Brexit has a very strong mandate, whatever those annoying couple of friends on Facebook are saying.

The turnout of over 70% in last weeks Referendum was higher than in 1975 when only 64% of eligible electors voted in the last Common Market poll

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_European_Communities_membership_referendum,_1975

By any historical or world wide electoral standards the 2016 EU Referendum vote gives a clear mandate.

Outside of Coalitions no UK government for years has polled more than 50% of those who cast their votes let alone the entire electorate. In fact parties have routinely won landslide victories with less than 45% of the popular vote including both the Thatcher and Blair governments. You have to go back to the 1964 to find government with a popular mandate bigger than 45% of the votes cast

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Very many are neutral.....why would anybody vote a particular way when they have no preference or see that both alternatives have both positive and negative sides.......we all voted, but one vote cancelled out the other 50:50.....so same result as if none of us voted......nothing is perfect. ;)

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I didn't vote, because I couldn't be bothered. That's part of democracy. -_- I am reasonably happy with the OUT vote. Let's all be British and get proper black passports back, and not these bendy red things.

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Clear vote for LEAVE. Also almost every region in England (and wales) voted to LEAVE by a majority. This really wasn't close at all. If it was FPTP leave would have had a landslide.

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Clear vote for LEAVE. Also almost every region in England (and wales) voted to LEAVE by a majority. This really wasn't close at all. If it was FPTP leave would have had a landslide.

But there is the problem Scotland and NI clearly voted to remain. Not clear cut and breaks up the country.

In fact you might argue those with direct democracy voted to remain. The disenfranchised voted out.

In fact I'm sure if the north was asked to if they wanted London to feck off that vote would get a clear majority.

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The results for the referendum officially are given as:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/politics/eu_referendum/results

Leave
Vote share
51.9%
Votes 17,410,742 Votes
Remain
Vote share
48.1%
Votes 16,141,241 Votes
However if you analyse the full vote
Leave 37.4%
Remain 34.7%
Did not vote 27.8%
Ultimately there is no consensus, nearly 13m for what ever reason offered no opinion. It's very dangerous to assume that those who did not vote are happy with the result. Yes they should have voted, but it's a substantial number to have sat on the side lines.
It's a huge hole and certainly I don't think Boris is really a man who can unite a disunited kingdom. In fact I can't think of one career politician who can step up to the plate.

This is what the 48% voted for :-

EuPart_zpspclh4sae.jpg

That 27.8% probably voted in the EU elections and had voter fatigue.

This is what the 48% are demanding.... How f**king dare they!

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But there is the problem Scotland and NI clearly voted to remain. Not clear cut and breaks up the country.

In fact you might argue those with direct democracy voted to remain. The disenfranchised voted out.

In fact I'm sure if the north was asked to if they wanted London to feck off that vote would get a clear majority.

This is the main thing that concerns me. The split in the result between the 4 countries could make Brexit very messy.

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  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   64 members have voted

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