Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

workingpoor

How To Make Money From Brexit

Recommended Posts

Any ideas or strategies?

Forex? Quick trade shares? etc

I have a share trading account and i notice one of the companies i follow is down 20p over the last 2 days.

Parliment goes into recession next week until 4th sept so if as i suspect a big stall is coming to prevent invoking Article 50 untill october, what will happen to share prices & the £ ?

Will the EU force the issue and demand article 50 is triggered now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Freudian slip, working poor, I think parliament goes into recess.

The EU have no power to force us to trigger article 50. That's for us to do. I guess they could decide to fling us out, but wouldn't that just alienate the European public still further?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is plenty of calls to get on with it from Brussels "whole continent been taken hostage until oct" etc

And Brexit Tories are pushing Cameron today urging him not to delay for 3 months as that's unrealistic?

Not sure if the whole 3 month delay is because they all want to go on summer holidays?

Will we see the £ and shares float back up to pre-referendum levels and stabilise over the summer if nothing is done until oct?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The people who will be directing it all are shot and need a break after the relentless campaigning. We're only leaving once so take the time to do it right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm making money the old fashioned way, by working, and then saving a bit that's left over, when there is. :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The people who will be directing it all are shot and need a break after the relentless campaigning. We're only leaving once so take the time to do it right.

Just seems to me that they are trying to buy 2 years & 3 months no?

Or is it really that they genuinely don't know what the reaction will be when they confirm submission of Article 50?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just seems to me that they are trying to buy 2 years & 3 months no?

Or is it really that they genuinely don't know what the reaction will be when they confirm submission of Article 50?

I don't know, but I want it all done properly.

Having seen the mess the government made of welfare reform (right idea, done very badly) I don't want them given any excuse to make a mess of this on the grounds that they were being pressured to do it quickly.

I would rather have all of our historic fishing rights recovered in five years than half of them recovered in a year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not convinced article 50 will be triggered. As an out voter my opinion is that 52:48 isn't enough of a majority over the in camp to take such a momentous decision. If you ran the referendum again next week you might get a different result.

I hope that this is used as a catalyst for some negotiation and reform and another referendum. Once triggered can article 50 be suspended?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not convinced article 50 will be triggered. As an out voter my opinion is that 52:48 isn't enough of a majority over the in camp to take such a momentous decision. If you ran the referendum again next week you might get a different result.

I hope that this is used as a catalyst for some negotiation and reform and another referendum. Once triggered can article 50 be suspended?

And you call yourself an Out voter!

If it had gone the other way with an even slimmer majority then that would have been it. Case closed, move on, no second chance.

This is the same. Done fall for the establishment's weasel words as they try to edge us into their desired result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And you call yourself an Out voter!

If it had gone the other way with an even slimmer majority then that would have been it. Case closed, move on, no second chance.

This is the same. Done fall for the establishment's weasel words as they try to edge us into their desired result.

But we're not like them! I actually do, genuinely believe in the democratic process and I don't think that 52:48 provides enough of a mandate for such a decision.

The issue with article 50 is that it starts the clock ticking. They would use that fixed end date to strong arm the uk to make concessions at the final moment. That is why Juncker is stamping his feet to get this negotiating position. T*sser.

Juncker's statement is exactly brexit was the right vote. He's an unelected civil servant. He has no business trying to bully an elected government into making a decision

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Financial strategies are difficult at the moment because the usual bolt hole of the U.S. dollar, bonds etc are going to be just as uncertain due to the upcoming U.S. election which also could well be an upset. Equity markets look unstable but profitable international companies that pay regular dividends and that are not tied into just one continental location are probably a decent long term punt unless you think global war is imminent.

With regard to delays in the UK leaving the EU I think the way the vote played out means an attempts to cludge the result with deals, second referendum etc will just make the matter worse. Issues have been revealed regarding the structure of the UK as well as the EU that need to be resolved first. The worst scenario is London in alliance with Scotland and NI trying to gerrymander a solution that overrides an out vote in England and Wales that was a great deal bigger than the headline figure. That means UK needs to leave the EU and sort out its internal differences before it can re define its relationship with Europe. That probably is going to mean letting Scotland and NI go their own way and horror of horrors recognising the fact that there may be an English national identity which is currently being suppressed for various reasons by both the EU and the UK as political units. I can't help thinking that if the EU had been more proactive in dealing with that issue the result on Thursday might have been different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm making money the old fashioned way, by working, and then saving a bit that's left over, when there is. :huh:

Prostitution?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd just be happy to secure my money. The implied yield based on 3% inflation for index linked gilts is a loss of capital of 1.5% approx. per year depending on duration.

why would you do this, well if the s%%t really hits the fan,20, 30% inflation, then a small loss of capital would be acceptable so long as the UK honours its debt, which it has since 1690 in spite of Napolean and Hitler.

Guess I'll stick to simple bank deposits for now.....1.5%pa is a bloody expensive way of storing wealth.

https://www.fixedincomeinvestor.co.uk/x/bondtable.html?groupid=3530

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Various UK life insurers had a 20% share price fall on Friday. Why escapes me. Might be an opportunity to pick up some cheap L&G and Aviva if that floats your boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With regard to delays in the UK leaving the EU I think the way the vote played out means an attempts to cludge the result with deals, second referendum etc will just make the matter worse. Issues have been revealed regarding the structure of the UK as well as the EU that need to be resolved first. The worst scenario is London in alliance with Scotland and NI trying to gerrymander a solution that overrides an out vote in England and Wales that was a great deal bigger than the headline figure. That means UK needs to leave the EU and sort out its internal differences before it can re define its relationship with Europe. That probably is going to mean letting Scotland and NI go their own way and horror of horrors recognising the fact that there may be an English national identity which is currently being suppressed for various reasons by both the EU and the UK as political units. I can't help thinking that if the EU had been more proactive in dealing with that issue the result on Thursday might have been different.

This is pretty much it, isn't it? Don't blame the electorate, blame the politicians. I was discussing this with a colleague yesterday, expressing a concern about the rise of the far right and his opinion that brexit gives credence to the far right all across Europe, furthering division. To his credit (he is a very bright and fair-minded kind of guy, not an SJW), he did take the point on board that it was happening because the EU as a political body was absolutely failing to deal with the any of the issues that were underlying the increase in nationalism across the EU. The upshot is that many people in many nations of the EU just don't feel like it's working for them. That has to be addressed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe. Maybe an element.

I just think that 'immigration' as a catch all has much more behind it than simply 'racism' as portrayed by the BBC, broadcast media and echoed naively by the young. If that were the case, why would so many non 'English' vote to Leave.

Basically, in most people's minds 'immigration' means scarcity of work, lower pay, pressure on housing and public services like schools and hospitals. It DOES NOT NECESSARILY mean people hate eastern europeans. It is basically a reaction to the neoliberal aspects of the European project where surplus cheap labour can be deployed by business where they want, to the detriment of living standards.

Those who are unlikely to travel to work outside their locality see this as a threat. Those who want to hop across Europe deploying their superior skills to the highest payer see Leave as taking away their opportunities.

Agreed.

I have pointed out elsewhere the fact that the EU is great for rich well educated people who benefit from all the features such as ease of travel and cross border career opportunities while being a bit shite for the poor who just suffer endless wage arbitration. That factor applies right across Europe not just in the UK

The more I investigate the whole Leave vote the more I notice the nuances in choice. For example in Wolverhampton which has a big black and Asian population, the vote for Leave was 62%, one of the highest recorded anywhere. That means people who would never vote UKIP or even Tory have chosen Brexit.

I keep harking back to the 1975 vote and the warnings from Peter Shore that in putting all our money on Europe we were throwing away that legacy of relationships with the rest of the world that Empire for good and bad given us. At the time many of our Commonwealth partners, many of whom had sacrificed much blood and treasure for us in two world wars, felt deeply hurt by the decision and some such as New Zealand suffered a great deal economically. We owe them all a profound apology. The UK as a whole needs to revisit that earlier decision and look at some of the more measured argument both for and against joining the European project that were put out at that time rather than the shrill nonsense being spouted now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems to me the EU want to make Brexit look painful to the people, pour encourager les autres. It makes me wonder how many other countries' populations will be demanding a referendum. ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do we have sufficient vetoes left to gum up the business of the EU until we get a satisfactory agreement?

What negotiating cards do we hold?

The only negotiating card that matters - the bottom line. One of the the EUs biggest export markets (if not the biggest?) and the second biggest net contributor to the coffers.

The outcome of this is fairly obvious to me - there is too much to unwind in the 2 year period set down by Article 50 so we will become an EFTA member as an interim solution with negotiations ongoing for the next decade or so on any neccesary bilateral agreements and working out which bits of EU law we want to keep. This would pretty much amount to the referendum resulting in the rejection of the Lisbon treaty, which is what most informed Brexiters wanted all along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   61 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.