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Brexit What Happens Next Thread ---multiple merged threads.


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She's even more of a sneaky snake than her predecessor.

On the subject above, who on earth is going to replace Corbyn? I'm not a Labour voter but I favour a strong opposition. Corbyn backed the wrong horse in the referendum but there's nobody I can see who is any better? If they elect Chukkus Urmoney they'll be assigned to the dustbin by everyone. Who are they thinking of? Looking at the odds, apparently (I'm honestly not making this up) Hilary Benn or John McDonnell. W-T-F.

The only ones I favour would be David Miliband or Alan Johnson. But they're both unlikely.

Edited by spunko2010
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I do.   https://twitter.com/housepricemania

1409 pages....you guys should have your own forum !!!

Oh OK. Shame that really, but hey it looks like @IMHAL helped us both out. Nice repost though, thanks ! Any thoughts ?  

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Telegraph says 50pc of house transactions have fell through since yesterday.

Yeah. Like they would be able to get that info in 24h.

To be honest, all the Sold signs sicne January are still up.

Maybe the EAs are looking for an excuse to say - Fck it, this transaction not happening.

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Relax, the European project is all well and good.

The size of the prize requires a few hoops, incuding losing first referendum if necessary

Next steps of the plan:

- Money folk kick the crap out of UK economy.

- Terrorist or whatever event(s) to foster further fear, insecurity, etc

- EU maintain hard line.

- Remainers (incl BBC et al) keep up debate, including showing Leave as liars

- Excuse fabricated for second referendum.

- Referendum held and the smallish majority switches to Remain:

- Scared, return to perceived safety of EU

- Leave branded liars, now is not time to experiment, etc

- Keep Scotland in the Union

- New Labour leader far more actively pro Remain

- We had our fun and blew off some steam

- etc

- Maybe Osborne et al emerge from shadows as safe pairs of hands

- EU now free to leap to the next phase of closer integration (aka statism)

- Biggest block to this (UK) neutralised (Greece, etc too small, UK perfect)

- Remaining dissent in EU area learns lesson and shuts up

- Win-Win as plan B if this does not work is go ahead without UK as dissent still dies

- Happy days:

- The great leap not possible without these hoops

- Business as usual: cheap labour, multinational control, etc ensures rich stay rich

- More dividends and property assets and rents for baby boomers

- Youth happy, even though poor wages, jobs, housing, etc

- Poor baby boomers put back in their place

- Public services (esp NHS) and benefits brought more in line with EU averages so lower taxes

Edited by Fence
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Relax, the European project is all well and good.

The size of the prize requires a few hoops, incuding losing first referendum if necessary

Next steps of the plan:

- Money folk kick the crap out of UK economy.

- Terrorist or whatever event(s) to foster further fear, insecurity, etc

- EU maintain hard line.

- Remainers (incl BBC et al) keep up debate, including showing Leave as liars

- Excuse fabricated for second referendum.

- Referendum held and the smallish majority switches to Remain:

- Scared, return to perceived safety of EU

- Leave branded liars, now is not time to experiment, etc

- Keep Scotland in the Union

- New Labour leader far more actively pro Remain

- We had our fun and blew off some steam

- etc

- Maybe Osborne et al emerge from shadows as safe pairs of hands

- EU now free to leap to the next phase of closer integration (aka statism)

- Biggest block to this (UK) neutralised (Greece, etc too small, UK perfect)

- Remaining dissent in EU area learns lesson and shuts up

- Win-Win as plan B if this does not work is go ahead without UK as dissent still dies

- Happy days:

- The great leap not possible without these hoops

- Business as usual: cheap labour, multinational control, etc ensures rich stay rich

- More dividends and property assets and rents for baby boomers

- Youth happy, even though poor wages, jobs, housing, etc

- Poor baby boomers put back in their place

- Public services (esp NHS) and benefits brought more in line with EU averages so lower taxes

OK, but if they try and "kick the crap" out of the UK economy then the EU is also harmed because we all know the EU exports far more to the UK than the UK exports to the EU.Plus you've got the Deutsche Bank situation - 75 trillion in derivatives and they hit a 30 year share price low a couple weeks ago.

I really feel time is short now, the financial system cannot be held together much longer so here is what i think will happen.

- Discussions stalled until October as Cameron mentioned (UK still in EU, no article 50 as yet)

- War starts, EU leaders call for increased integration to counter perceived threat.Probable EU army.

- UK PM suspends referendum results due to matters of national security (war)

I am not sure how they can run a large scale standard war with a collapsing currency system though, it could be a very short war with nuclear attacks.The elite will retreat to bunkers.

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We could rejoin the European Free Trade Association, which we founded.

Unfortunately EFTA was nobbled by the EU and requires free movement of people and even acceptance of the acquis. You may as well not bother leaving the EU, frankly.

We should not join EFTA. We should tell the EU how it is and make a bilateral arrangement with it, or simply go elsewhere, and Germany can find someone else to buy their cars. Apparently we started negotiating a trade deal with Ghana on Friday. I know Ghana isn't much of a coup but, the world is big. Europe is small.

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Unfortunately EFTA was nobbled by the EU and requires free movement of people and even acceptance of the acquis. You may as well not bother leaving the EU, frankly.

We should not join EFTA. We should tell the EU how it is and make a bilateral arrangement with it, or simply go elsewhere, and Germany can find someone else to buy their cars. Apparently we started negotiating a trade deal with Ghana on Friday. I know Ghana isn't much of a coup but, the world is big. Europe is small.

You'd think Germany were the only country that could make decent cars the way people go on about it! Japan apparently have a few minor car companies that are pretty good, perhaps they could ramp up production and we could import a few. Just an idea...

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So, do we believe Cameron when he said there were no contingency plans being made in the case of Brexit by the Civil Service, Treasury etc?

If true then with a zombie government until October, a coup against Corbyn, a possible election in the Autumn, a Scottish referendum almost certain, and a Northern Irish one possible, our government isn't going to be in any fit state to do anything for a while.

Interesting times.

..the Government are not the important people in this change ....they will appoint teams with experts and drive who are experienced in successful change, transformation and delivery .....the type of people (politicians) we have or will appoint are not the type to implement change ...they are merely the stakeholders in this game....if they appoint the wrong people they will screw up big time..... :rolleyes:

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You'd think Germany were the only country that could make decent cars the way people go on about it! Japan apparently have a few minor car companies that are pretty good, perhaps they could ramp up production and we could import a few. Just an idea...

Quite. It's more the Germans having to be nice to us, not the other way around!

EFTA nations are all little minnows and had to sign up to all sorts of things. The UK is not a minnow.

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You'd think Germany were the only country that could make decent cars the way people go on about it! Japan apparently have a few minor car companies that are pretty good, perhaps they could ramp up production and we could import a few. Just an idea...

Like the Toyotas and Nissans that had to be recalled this year? And the Toyotas. Nissans and Mitsubishis which had problems with emissions, so similar to those in VWs?

Those cars?

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How likely is it that the bankers will swap the prospect of a future lighter regulation regime in the UK post Brexit for the virtual certainty of a more regulated situation within the EU? I can't see a mass migration of financial services into the EU- the bankers are crooks not idiots.

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Someone has to stay and pay tax. However much we all like to bash the city of London the public finances will be in an even worse state if we drive all the nations big taxpayers away.

The banks were planning on moving staff anyway (and in some cases, had already started).

London is too expensive.

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I've been following this forum for awhile, but this is my first post! I worked/studied in London for several years but am currently in the US (my native country). I'll be moving to the Southeast this year so have been watching the housing market closely (how I found this forum).

As someone watching this all unfold from the outside I'm amazed at hysteria from remainers about how the UK is "irrelevant" to the rest of the world outside the EU. I think a lot of people are forgetting that there a plenty of countries in the EU watching how this all plays out because they might be considering their own exit plans. There is also the fact that US and Russia like being world powers. They don't want a United States of Europe. If Brussels chooses this moment to try to exert its power by punishing the UK, it will not go unnoticed. The UK has a lot more bargaining power in this situation than the Remain voters think.

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Telegraph says 50pc of house transactions have fell through since yesterday.

It's very much on. I've just picked up my daughter from a play-date and took a chance to discuss the vote with the hosts. The lady of the house was absolutely devastated. In between other things, like how she'd love Europe to be one huge state and how she'd love to be just a European citizen with a European passport, she also mentioned that a friend of hers had 10 viewing lined up for this weekend and ALL of them were cancelled yesterday.

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Next?

You get a yank (Boris) in charge of the UK, and his twin (Trump) in charge of the US.

And a very nasty divorce. No breakup ever ends well.

Hey ho. Just over 34% of the voting age folk in UK have given the ultimatum to the EU.

Britain has given a bit FU to all its main trading parters. Amazing.

Older folk who own their homes and have pensions had nowt to fear from the Brexit, whichever way it went.

Young people are now facing a very uncertain future. Working age people the same. Include business owners, the millions of EU citizens working here, our energy security, and of course the break up of the UK.

This decision won't make a bean of difference to immigration. Without immigration this country is going to go terminal. I think that even the most staunch Brexit talking heads have all conceded that this is the case.

And nobody, nobody at all wants a reversion to pre-EU Europe.

We can blame Cameron for this one.

Now, this vote was actually important enough to borrow from the Aussies and make it a legal requirement to cast a ballot.

I'd hazard to bet on this whole issue being put down through an act of parliament, or one of the houses within it.

This petition ongoing. The collapse of the currency and great swathes of the economy in peril.

The very fact that we are here, without any real solutions or even a way forward... not even a framework... illustrates just how crazy and emotive this whole campaign has been run.

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Next?

You get a yank (Boris) in charge of the UK, and his twin (Trump) in charge of the US.

And a very nasty divorce. No breakup ever ends well.

Hey ho. Just over 34% of the voting age folk in UK have given the ultimatum to the EU.

Britain has given a bit FU to all its main trading parters. Amazing.

Older folk who own their homes and have pensions had nowt to fear from the Brexit, whichever way it went.

Young people are now facing a very uncertain future. Working age people the same. Include business owners, the millions of EU citizens working here, our energy security, and of course the break up of the UK.

This decision won't make a bean of difference to immigration. Without immigration this country is going to go terminal. I think that even the most staunch Brexit talking heads have all conceded that this is the case.

And nobody, nobody at all wants a reversion to pre-EU Europe.

We can blame Cameron for this one.

Now, this vote was actually important enough to borrow from the Aussies and make it a legal requirement to cast a ballot.

I'd hazard to bet on this whole issue being put down through an act of parliament, or one of the houses within it.

This petition ongoing. The collapse of the currency and great swathes of the economy in peril.

The very fact that we are here, without any real solutions or even a way forward... not even a framework... illustrates just how crazy and emotive this whole campaign has been run.

Hyperbole.

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How can it be that a country with over 65 million people needs relentless immigration? This is a problem that the UK needs to address, it is addicted to cheap labour.

And where the hell is CamperVan and his doom mongering predictions which have failed to materialise? I think he predicted GBP down 20%, it finished down 7% yesterday, that is not a collapse. If we have no access to the single market we pay the external tariff of 3-4% so we are already 4% more competitive than last week.

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Someone has to stay and pay tax. However much we all like to bash the city of London the public finances will be in an even worse state if we drive all the nations big taxpayers away.

Until the tail event and they crash the economy

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How can it be that a country with over 65 million people needs relentless immigration? This is a problem that the UK needs to address, it is addicted to cheap labour.

And where the hell is CamperVan and his doom mongering predictions which have failed to materialise? I think he predicted GBP down 20%, it finished down 7% yesterday, that is not a collapse. If we have no access to the single market we pay the external tariff of 3-4% so we are already 4% more competitive than last week.

Yeah, because we all want to pay £20 for a pair of socks.

What the feck do you think the British empire was built on?

The very thought that we're going to have any kind of self sufficiency because the populace will accept taking reduced wages and pay over the odds for 'British' stuff is insane.

As are a lot of you it seems.

Immigration will carry on and is likely to increase significantly.

Brits cost too much, lack basic skills, and have a p1ss poor work ethic and undeserved sense of entitlement.

It will take perhaps two or three generations to remove these traits, not a referendum and the following 2 years. Laughable.

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