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Brexit What Happens Next Thread ---multiple merged threads.


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I do.   https://twitter.com/housepricemania

1409 pages....you guys should have your own forum !!!

Oh OK. Shame that really, but hey it looks like @IMHAL helped us both out. Nice repost though, thanks ! Any thoughts ?  

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UK can cave on LPF, they could cave on fish, but unlikely to cave on both. If Frost is ready to move on LPF do you think the Italians or Poles care about Macron's fish?

Looks as though the Monday flying visit has been torpedoed, suspect it was always just the Commission trying to look willing. And a bit embarrassed after the member states waded in.

 

Time for them to wade in on our beaches?

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Do any brexiters think no deal is "an answer"?

 

Or do you accept in the event of a no deal we will still be forced into discussing a deal, a deal of parts, an interacting deal, partial deal etc etc. for the next umpteen years

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Do any brexiters think no deal is "an answer"?

 

Or do you accept in the event of a no deal we will still be forced into discussing a deal, a deal of parts, an interacting deal, partial deal etc etc. for the next umpteen years

I follow a number of no dealers on the Twits.  They're going to have a bit of a shock come January...

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I follow a number of no dealers on the Twits.  They're going to have a bit of a shock come January...

Painful.

UK is not Germanys export partner.. ah why even bother. Just painful!

Edited by captainb
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UK can cave on LPF, they could cave on fish, but unlikely to cave on both. If Frost is ready to move on LPF do you think the Italians or Poles care about Macron's fish?

Looks as though the Monday flying visit has been torpedoed, suspect it was always just the Commission trying to look willing. And a bit embarrassed after the member states waded in.

 

Both the UK and the EU positions on fishing are not reasonable. French were catching fish in those waters long before the EU, so the UK claim "it is our fish" is historically incorrect. From other side the UK is leaving the EU so the UK is outside of CFP and things need to change. The situation complicates a fact that fishing is one of the flagship Brexit "benefits" sold to Leavers and it was intended to be used as a leverage by the UK to get a better deal. I think without politics both sides could find a solution.

A robust LFP/governance is an existential issue for the EU. The UK wants to avoid it so it can have an advantage of its proximity to the EU, have a better deal than an EU membership. Those are fundamentally opposing interests. Not sure how this can be resolved.          

All this "no more talks" noise is another childish UK negotiation tactic, like fishing leverage, BJ's deadlines, the internal market bill. 

The EU position is more mature. They want talk to the end, not really believing a deal can be made but mostly because they don't want to be perceived as the ones who leave the table.  

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Both the UK and the EU positions on fishing are not reasonable. French were catching fish in those waters long before the EU, so the UK claim "it is our fish" is historically incorrect.

 

History doesn't come into it. Legal right is what matters. The British were fishing around Iceland for hundreds of years, but had to agree that fishing within Icelandic terratorial waters had to end. The French and Dutch will have to go and fish around the Republic of Ireland.

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No big deal (sic). I always expected no deal now under the headlamps and a quiet deal done in a year or so's time. Let's just move on.

Our exporting industries and the markets for them will have permanently disappeared by then, never to return.

We however, shall always buy European hardware.

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History doesn't come into it. Legal right is what matters. The British were fishing around Iceland for hundreds of years, but had to agree that fishing within Icelandic terratorial waters had to end. The French and Dutch will have to go and fish around the Republic of Ireland.

All laws are conventions, often based on historical arrangements.

The EU countries had a legal right to fish their granted by Fisheries Conventions from 1964, from which the UK withdrawn in 2017.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisheries_Convention

12 miles fisheries zone is not a God given law. It started with the US unilaterally making a claim, an act of an international theft. 

https://digitalcommons.law.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3487&context=lalrev

200 miles fisheries zones started with an Iceland unilateral claim (theft).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cod_Wars

Edited by slawek
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All laws are conventions, often based on historical arrangements.

The EU countries had a legal right to fish their granted by Fisheries Conventions from 1964, from which the UK withdrawn in 2017.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisheries_Convention

12 miles fisheries zone is not a God given law. It started with the US unilaterally making a claim, an act of an international theft. 

https://digitalcommons.law.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3487&context=lalrev

Where the Icelanders go, why should we (and the rest of the World) not follow?

The North Sea bordering states claim what is under the seabed, so why should they not claim the waters above? As far as agreed median lines.

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All laws are conventions, often based on historical arrangements.

The EU countries had a legal right to fish their granted by Fisheries Conventions from 1964, from which the UK withdrawn in 2017.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisheries_Convention

12 miles fisheries zone is not a God given law. It started with the US unilaterally making a claim, an act of an international theft. 

https://digitalcommons.law.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3487&context=lalrev

This shows the French EEZ...

https://www.marineregions.org/gazetteer.php?p=details&id=5677

...and the Dutch...

https://www.marineregions.org/gazetteer.php?p=details&id=5668

There's also UNCLOS...

https://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/CBP-8396/CBP-8396.pdf

Access to fishing ground

A no deal Brexit, in which there was no transitional agreement on fisheries until the end of 2020, would mean that the UK would become an independent coastal state from exit day taking over responsibility for its EEZ. The UK would no longer be bound by the Common Fisheries Policy and could deny access to EU Member States’ vessels. Likewise, UK vessels which currently fish in other Member States’ waters could be denied access by the EU. However, under international legislation (UNCLOS), there is an emphasis on the need for States to minimise economic dislocation

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Where the Icelanders go, why should we (and the rest of the World) not follow?

The North Sea bordering states claim what is under the seabed, so why should they not claim the waters above? As far as agreed median lines.

All those claims don't have any basis, it is just grabbing by a stronger something that doesn't have an owner yet. 

 

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Nah, thats per module, not pack, and there is 4 in a Models 3, so $16-28,000 for a $35-50,000 car. 

And thats dope smoking optimist Mr Musks' estimate.

 

Model 3 drive unit & body is designed like a commercial truck for a million mile life. Current battery modules should last 300k to 500k miles (1500 cycles). Replacing modules (not pack) will only cost $5k to $7k.

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 13, 2019

oh ok. learn something new every day

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Do any brexiters think no deal is "an answer"?

 

Or do you accept in the event of a no deal we will still be forced into discussing a deal, a deal of parts, an interacting deal, partial deal etc etc. for the next umpteen years

My area's view is:  Yes. The UK  can ****** them by walking away.  They're bluffing. 

30% of the population don't give a rats **** about all the greedy fat employers going bust. 

So... we starve, the eu boast they won't starve. Round here theyre used to poverty, and they think the eu is lying. So we all starve, but hey, the locals were living hand to mouth for years anyway.  

Brexiters will support the pm walking away. And they will compete on starvation with Europe.  

That is the view from the solid brexit support. 

It may look to you insane, but it's very real. 

It's rock solid brexit support, and highly militant where I am. If they get hungry, they'll eat the rich. ( or the immigrants. That's the phrase going round). 

Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings. The only hope is perhaps my area is unrepresentative? 

 

 

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Operation Backpedal underway, Merkel and Rutte seem to be saying, "you know where we deliberately took out the intensify negotiations line and said the UK has to make all the necessary moves, well that was just a misunderstanding."

All very muddled at moment.

 

Edited by thehowler
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Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings. The only hope is perhaps my area is unrepresentative

I am afraid a lot of the locals in my area are similar 24G24. 
 

The “45 years contributing cash and now they won’t even treat us like Canada” approach from Boris is proving very effective. 
 

I accept that many in the U.K. will have some hard times ahead in no deal, but that is not going to have the Anti-Brexit Backlash result that europhiles are hoping for. Far from it.  

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Looks like we'll need that Britishvolt gigasite up and running before 2027 then!

No idea on the scale though...can the EU really produce enough batteries for all car production by then?

https://britishvolt.com/

That website is dismal, the company has nothing.

Where will they get their battery design/chemistry. Tesla has just moved the goal posts way off into the distance, are they going to licence now obsolete technology or do they have some new world beating design up their sleeve.

Where will they get their production line machinery from. Tesla has already bought Germany's best producer and Mercedes, Volkswagen, GM etc. have bought up every bid of available production for years to come. 

Who will be their customer, what UK car companies have the financial clout to compete with Tesla, VW, Mercedes etc.     

All I can see here is a potential rerun of the Grayling ferry fiasco but on a far greater scale.     

 

 

 

    

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****** Brexit and the northern retards who voted for it. 

Those Northern scum.................I ask you.........just you all go bust by Boris and Cummings hand..........you fooking fannies.  ;)

 

Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, shefield.............................time to go back to 1850.

Manchester voted to remain. 60.4%

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  • 432 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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