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Lewisham House Collapse

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A house has collapsed in Lewisham worth about £650K

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/08/renovation-disaster-as-700k-house-in-lewisham-collapses-during-b/

The scariest thing is that according to Zoopla prices in that road have gone from £35K

to £630K in 20 years

http://www.zoopla.co.uk/house-prices/london/aislibie-road/?q=Aislibie%20Road%2C%20London%20SE12&search_source=house-prices&num_months=240

I know some people would say nothing to do with shortage but if there is no shortage why convert homes to flats, which is happening in many parts of London.

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Just goes to show owning a home is not as rock solid as people think.....all houses are after all only four walls, a roof, doors and windows......anything can happen and does. ;)

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Something that frequently happens when taking apart an old house.

Just shows how decrepit and outdated and in need of replacing the UK housing stock is.

Edited by Rigged

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Perfectly normal thing to happen when taking apart an old house.

Just shows how decrepit and outdated and in need of replacing the UK housing stock is.

If prices had not risen by £550 K this work would not have been economic and probably the house would still be fine.

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If prices had not risen by £550 K this work would not have been economic and probably the house would still be fine.

Good point.

But many of these houses in London would have been torn down anywhere else in the country as they're decrepit and falling apart and in need of ludicrous sums thrown at them.

The housing stock in Blightly is appalling, when you drive through pretty much all of Western Europe they have far better quality houses than us.

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Says they had removed all the internal walls... Nuff said.

The price of trendy open plan and dodgy diy!

They had to take out all the walls to bump the price up another £200k .......add value innit. :P

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It could be worth more as an empty plot. An unusual opportunity to create a new-build end terrace house, no planning permission needed.

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Can't go wrong with property.....from what I read a dodgy builder may be to blame, which could make for an interesting insurance claim.

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Can't go wrong with property.....from what I read a dodgy builder may be to blame, which could make for an interesting insurance claim.

Natural justice.

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It could be worth more as an empty plot. An unusual opportunity to create a new-build end terrace house, no planning permission needed.

Found one.....How much!

new-house-dagmar-gardens-london-3d-conte

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I'm surprised this sort of thing doesn't happen more often tbh.

SE London is full of grotty, poorly built early 20th century terraces that have become prime development targets for pwoperdee obsessed wannabe Sarah Beeny's

Most employ the cheapest eastern european labourers they can find with a view to sprucing them up and flipping them as quickly as they can. Lots of corners cut and I personally wouldn't touch one with a barge pole.

I'm not one for schadenfreude (well not normally anyway) but hopefully this will cause some of them to at least think of the potential costs of cutting corners

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It could be worth more as an empty plot. An unusual opportunity to create a new-build end terrace house, no planning permission needed.

Are you sure planning permission won't be needed???

I'd agree that if the replacement property is broadly similar to the one that collapsed (size, style, etc) then common sense would say why should one be forced to go through various administrative and bureucratic hoops, with all the ensuing extra cost.

But it wouldn't surprise me in the least if the law and the local authority will be like Vogons and expect the opportunistic builder to do this.

Edited by anonguest

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It appears that they removed the ceiling joists and internal walls - huge mistake.

I wonder if they informed the lender/insurer of the works?

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I'm surprised this sort of thing doesn't happen more often tbh.

SE London is full of grotty, poorly built early 20th century terraces that have become prime development targets for pwoperdee obsessed wannabe Sarah Beeny's

Most employ the cheapest eastern european labourers they can find with a view to sprucing them up and flipping them as quickly as they can. Lots of corners cut and I personally wouldn't touch one with a barge pole.

I'm not one for schadenfreude (well not normally anyway) but hopefully this will cause some of them to at least think of the potential costs of cutting corners

True, I was on one job in Balham where the building shifted to the extent an interior door had to be kicked open, and another one in Kew where an RSJ was resting on 'breeze blocks' rather than proper keystones. This was flagged up by Building Control, so it got plastered over. :mellow:

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It appears that they removed the ceiling joists and internal walls - huge mistake.

I wonder if they informed the lender/insurer of the works?

I was interested to know what they did to make the place fall down.

From my amatuer observations it appeared that the house was struggling to hold the weight of the roof. The gable wall end seemed to be ok, it was at the party wall end where the roof was sagging.

The first floor external wall was bowing and it seems to be this giving way which caused the collapse. The ground floor first floor wall is still standing, which I think rules out it being caused by a basement extension/excavation.

It's mentioned that the internal walls have been removed. Would the internal walls normally carry part of the roof load? (if that is the problem). I thought that was normally carried by the external walls and the internal walls carried some of the weight of the floors.

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