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Byron

Do You Like Fruit?

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I have to admit that after a lifetime of trying, I have never got to like raw fruit.

Apple pie etc. is fine, but raw fruit, no thank you.

My son also dislikes fruit.

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Raspberries and grapes are good.

Russet apples are good.

Bananas meet a requirement. (Potassium)

But i generally would normally look beyond the fruit bowl for my snacking needs.

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I do love fruit. Especially kiwi-fruit. Yet for some reason I don't eat it very often.

The we buy some, I forget that we have it, and it goes off.

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I like many fruits, and pretty-much always have some around the house. Best of all when they're seasonal, but we're not quite there yet, so I shamelessly ate grapes at lunchtime (as dessert to pasta+pinenut salad) and blueberries in the evening (as dessert to stuffed&baked mushrooms).

Sweet, juicy, delicious.

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Yes. Got to wonder why fruit doesn't appeal to you Bryon (?)

Peeled apple of a sweet type, chopped into small piece, to eat with small sliced pieces of cheese. Yum.

Bananas. Always surprised at the label of origin. All the different choices. Read a tip to leave in a bag, so they keep fresh and.. (This method prevents ethylene gas, produced naturally in the ripening process, from reaching other parts of the fruit and prematurely ripening it) - ?.

Cantaloupe melons. Bliss. Although advice I follow is to wash your hands thoroughly (with antibacterial handwash) after touching the outer skin of such melons - suggested risk from pathogens. So many mixed views that I gave up trying to follow it all. Wasn't sure what was myth and what was risk.

Small clementines - all the sweet small easy peelers without pips, orange type fruits

Grapes.

Strawberries.

That's about it. A lot while since had raspberries or peaches or any other fruit etc. (Don't like pears).

------------

Apple crumble is a favourite.

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I somewhat empathise with the OP. I'm far more likely to reach for some brazil or walnuts for a quick snack than fruit. I don't know why. Possibly because my parents didn't buy much of it (they did buy plenty of veg though).

Some fruit is simply an, often sticky, inconvenience - and the quality is so variable. You can pick up a bag of satsumas one week and they will be everything you imagine - sweet, juicy and easy peeling. The next they will be slightly squishy dried out and tasteless. Kiwi fruit are delicious, but a pain to eat.

I like bananas and apples

I have grown to love berries - mostly wild - in recent years. Nothing beats the simple mediative joy of picking wild bilberries in the Welsh countryside.

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Fruits are like sweets to me.

Some I'm not that keen on so they can stay in the bowl for so long that they appear to be part of the furnishings whilst others are barely worth buying because I've entirely consumed them ten minutes after getting home.

Venger's list is similar to mine.

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My wife keeps a large selection in the fridge, it's nicer cold. We have strawberries, cherries, blueberries, blackberries and apples from the garden. Cherries are by far the best fruit, although recently I have become very partial to almost frozen pomegranate.

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I had an uglee fruit in the mid ninety's that was sensational. Haven't been able to source one since, very hard to get hold of.

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Don't mind it but it doesn't do much to satisfy the snacking impulse, and I've usually got a bit bored of an apple before I've eaten it all.

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Guest eight

I had an uglee fruit in the mid ninety's that was sensational. Haven't been able to source one since, very hard to get hold of.

I always believed there must be an uglee fruit, as people often tell me I fell from the uglee tree.

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That's about it. A lot while since had raspberries or peaches or any other fruit etc. (Don't like pears).

Don't like pears????

OK, many pears are difficult these days: they go so rapidly from hard/underripe to squashy/past-it that it's not worth trying to catch the right moment to eat fresh. I think that's an artifact of modern growing methods and picking too early.

A decent conference pear is better than most, and gives you at least a day or two of ripe&delicious. Otherwise, they can be stewed up and used in a variety of recipes when less than ripe, and they can also be used in a juicer.

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My wife keeps a large selection in the fridge, it's nicer cold. We have strawberries, cherries, blueberries, blackberries and apples from the garden. Cherries are by far the best fruit, although recently I have become very partial to almost frozen pomegranate.

For some of my time in Italy I had a three-way cooler device. Fridge, Freezer, and a third compartment - Larder - that stayed at 12 degrees. The larder was the ideal place to store fruit&veg.

Also great for other things - from butter to beer - that want neither refrigerating nor exposure to summer temperatures.

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I have grown to love berries - mostly wild - in recent years. Nothing beats the simple mediative joy of picking wild bilberries in the Welsh countryside.

They're great up Dartmoor too. Especially when followed by a swim in the rock pools. Though bloomin' hard work: first it's a bit of a triathlon to get up to where they grow, then it's a lot of work to pick just a modest quantity 'cos they're so tiny.

Blackberries may fight back and leave you shredded, but on balance they're still less hard work.

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Don't mind it but it doesn't do much to satisfy the snacking impulse, and I've usually got a bit bored of an apple before I've eaten it all.

Some apples are better than others.

A sweet, juicy apple is at its best when you're knackered from hard physical activity. Best ever comes after 100 miles on a bike and into the wind, when it's just what I need to keep going (damn, that should be past tense, haven't done that for quite a few years). More generally, apples are the best fruit for travelling, as they don't risk making a horrible mess like anything soft, nor are they a faff to eat like anything that needs peeling.

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I like all green vegetables, tomatoes, olives.

But I just don't like fruit.

I don't know why.

Also, I am not that keen on chocolate and will generally avoid it.

Bizarre, but I just wondered if I am alone.

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I like all green vegetables, tomatoes, olives.

But I just don't like fruit.

I don't know why.

Also, I am not that keen on chocolate and will generally avoid it.

Bizarre, but I just wondered if I am alone.

I've not known anybody like that. People who avoid all veg yes (one bloke who used to have what we called a "brown salad" at cold buffets - just meat and bread) but no-one eating veg and avoiding fruit.

So you may be all alone in the world.

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Don't like pears????

OK, many pears are difficult these days: they go so rapidly from hard/underripe to squashy/past-it that it's not worth trying to catch the right moment to eat fresh. I think that's an artifact of modern growing methods and picking too early.

A decent conference pear is better than most, and gives you at least a day or two of ripe&delicious. Otherwise, they can be stewed up and used in a variety of recipes when less than ripe, and they can also be used in a juicer.

Was forced to eat a pear by parents (fruit intake) on a few occasions. First one was just not right. They didn't eat any pears, but made us eat them. Perhaps why I've never given them much of a chance. Now you suggest they can be difficult anyway. Might give them another go (with conference pear now in mind).

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Might give them another go (with conference pear now in mind).

If that's based on what I posted, let me add one more suggestion. Leave it for now, and give them a try when the English conferences are in season in the autumn.

Out of season I'd only use pears for cooking or juicing.

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Was forced to eat a pear by parents (fruit intake) on a few occasions. First one was just not right. They didn't eat any pears, but made us eat them. Perhaps why I've never given them much of a chance. Now you suggest they can be difficult anyway. Might give them another go (with conference pear now in mind).

I would actually steer you away from conference pears; they are my least favourite pear as they can be a bit woody.

The delicious ones are the fatter ones with red patches which are beautifully sweet. They are ripe when the flesh at the neck gives to finger pressure; eat them before this and they are slightly tough.

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Do you like fruit Darlin?

Well, suck this, its a peach!

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^Sid The Sexist - (?) (Viz)

Thanks porca_m + Frank H (also for advice about flesh at the neck giving to finger pressure as a tell);

Tempted to taste test both types, but my initial reaction to differing opinions was to avoid pears and just stick with all fruits I really do enjoy.

I'm puzzled by Byron not finding any appeal from any of the fruits. Maybe a taste bud thing? Maybe there are quite a few others who feel same way.

BIL fears he has an allergy to bananas, because his parents suggested he cried as a child with some banana baby food. So he's avoided them ever since. Bananas = freedom. Restricted during WWII. Not sure if it's true but mother told me Gov/Winston Churchill issued some order after the war, that every child in the land be given free banana. So many never seen one. Seem to recall Germany also associated bananas with peace/freedom after the war. Resumption of trade and such imports.

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