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Uk Industry In Recession For Third Time In Eight Years

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-36266178

UK industry fell back into recession as it shrank for the second quarter in a row, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

It is the third time UK industry has been in recession in eight years.

Although industrial production rose 0.3% from February to March, it fell 0.4% both in the first three months of 2016 and in the last three of 2015.

Compared with a year ago, manufacturing production in the first quarter fell 1.9%, the biggest fall since 2013.

The biggest fall in output came from the basic iron and steel sector which saw production drop in March by 37.3% percent compared with a year earlier.

However, the oil and gas industries saw sharp gains, increasing production 17% in February, and 10.9% in March from the same months a year earlier.

Manufacturing and construction is proving to be a drag on the whole economy, helping slow UK economic growth from 0.6% in the last three months of 2015 to 0.4% between January and March, according to the ONS.

Weaker growth

Earlier this month a survey by Markit/CIPS also showed manufacturing contracting. Chris Williamson, chief economist at Markit said: "The goods-producing sector therefore looks to be on course to act as a drag on the economy again in the second quarter, contributing to a slowing in economic growth to near-stagnation.

"Growth could be even weaker if the surveys disappoint in coming month, which seems probable given the intensifying uncertainty over the outcome of the EU referendum."

Despite this, economist Ruth Miller from Capital Economics is optimistic for the rest of the year.

She said: "We still expect things to look up as the year progresses. Sterling's recent depreciation and our expectations that global growth will pick up slightly in 2016 should allow the sector to return to modest growth later this year."

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Chris Williamson @WilliamsonChris 1h1 hour ago

UK manufacturing output -0.4% in Q1. PMI, at 3-year low in April, signals worse to come in Q2

CiKlGSVXEAApZ6F.jpg
RBS Economics @RBS_Economics 2h2 hours ago

UK production falls -0.4%q/q in Q1. Always a good sign when "miscellaneous" is your fastest growing sub-sector...

CiKfajVXAAAYvOF.jpg

"March of the makers"

"All in this together"

Osborne knows best. Time for another round of austerity. That should sort it.

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Build more stuff, hey presto, construction and manufacturing output increase

Train more kids to work in the construction industry, hey presto more jobs

It isn't feckin rocket science to work this out

Roads and railways in this country are a disgrace, how about starting there. Build a few thousand km's of proper cycle paths at the same time, more jobs, health of the population increases, greenhouse gases down.

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Beat me to it. ^_^

....and last year, anything bad was blamed on election uncertainty. Next three years it will be "mid-term blues", then in 2020 we're back to election uncertainty.

Edited by canbuywontbuy

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Build more stuff, hey presto, construction and manufacturing output increase

Train more kids to work in the construction industry, hey presto more jobs

It isn't feckin rocket science to work this out

Roads and railways in this country are a disgrace, how about starting there. Build a few thousand km's of proper cycle paths at the same time, more jobs, health of the population increases, greenhouse gases down.

But it's easier and cheaper to hire eastern euros than train locals.

Edited by canbuywontbuy

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Build more stuff, hey presto, construction and manufacturing output increase

Train more kids to work in the construction industry, hey presto more jobs

It isn't feckin rocket science to work this out

Roads and railways in this country are a disgrace, how about starting there. Build a few thousand km's of proper cycle paths at the same time, more jobs, health of the population increases, greenhouse gases down.

Hey Presto Brunel Lives!

The future is high tech well paid jobs in technology related businesses. Construction only uses lots of labour because of outdated designs and practices.

But in general our education and ambition is a disgrace.

The working class still think education is something that is for the middle classes. Whilst the middle classes shun practical degrees and take soft subjects.

I don't want to cycle and the roads aren't that bad for a crowded island. Trains a disgrace ? depends where you live from Herts to Moorgate centre of the city -slow train 30 minutes £9.00 off peak pretty good value. and minimum 3 an hour

Edited by Greg Bowman

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Hey Presto Brunel Lives!

The future is high tech well paid jobs in technology related businesses. Construction only uses lots of labour because of outdated designs and practices.

But in general our education and ambition is a disgrace.

The working class still think education is something that is for the middle classes. Whilst the middle classes shun practical degrees and take soft subjects.

I don't want to cycle and the roads aren't that bad for a crowded island. Trains a disgrace ? depends where you live from Herts to Moorgate centre of the city -slow train 30 minutes £9.00 off peak pretty good value. and minimum 3 an hour

One talented well educated engineer may design something incredible

Who and how many people does it take to make that design become reality ? very few will be geniuses they will be trades and labour we need both always have always will the problem we have is cost and we all know where the major stumbling block is when it comes to cost

Costs need to come down to make this country competitive ,yet TPTB are are tackling the problem from the other end of the spectrum (from an individual's perspective it`s good) ,raising the NMW how competitive is that going to make this country ?

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Well of course London is OK, Crossrail and Thameslink = the rest of the countries total spend

There's a massive shortage of good engineering staff in the UK, plenty of labour and plenty of people doing crappy IT degrees.

Building stuff can't be offshored, fortunately.

Hey Presto Brunel Lives!

The future is high tech well paid jobs in technology related businesses. Construction only uses lots of labour because of outdated designs and practices.

But in general our education and ambition is a disgrace.

The working class still think education is something that is for the middle classes. Whilst the middle classes shun practical degrees and take soft subjects.

I don't want to cycle and the roads aren't that bad for a crowded island. Trains a disgrace ? depends where you live from Herts to Moorgate centre of the city -slow train 30 minutes £9.00 off peak pretty good value. and minimum 3 an hour

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Ugh not this b******s about 'soft subjects' again, usually from people who graduated from the 'University of Life'.

I did a languages degree; a subject where this country is seriously lacking in skills but usually derided as a 'soft liberal arts degree' by curmudgeons with a hard on for engineering.

Would you really prefer it if nobody at all studied art, literature, history or music? These things are all vital elements of the culture of this country.

As for the article, hardly a surprise really, given the events of q1. Nice bit of grist to the anti Brexit mill though.

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Would you really prefer it if nobody at all studied art, literature, history or music? These things are all vital elements of the culture of this country.

We have an employee with a fine arts degree, they answer the phone and lets us know when the ice cream van is outside.

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Ugh not this b******s about 'soft subjects' again, usually from people who graduated from the 'University of Life'.

I did a languages degree; a subject where this country is seriously lacking in skills but usually derided as a 'soft liberal arts degree' by curmudgeons with a hard on for engineering.

Would you really prefer it if nobody at all studied art, literature, history or music? These things are all vital elements of the culture of this country.

As for the article, hardly a surprise really, given the events of q1. Nice bit of grist to the anti Brexit mill though.

If you look at the numbers too many are graduating in subjects that will have no practical use. That is a result of allowing market forces to develop where there were none previously. We now create masses of graduates in the fields to suit the fashion of the day. I heard that there were thousands studying forensic science when only a handful would actually be able to apply that skill. It doesn't mean their qualifications are a complete waste, just that they're willfully miss-educating themselves. It's that that people moan about.

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Ugh not this b******s about 'soft subjects' again, usually from people who graduated from the 'University of Life'.

I did a languages degree; a subject where this country is seriously lacking in skills but usually derided as a 'soft liberal arts degree' by curmudgeons with a hard on for engineering.

Would you really prefer it if nobody at all studied art, literature, history or music? These things are all vital elements of the culture of this country.

As for the article, hardly a surprise really, given the events of q1. Nice bit of grist to the anti Brexit mill though.

What has a degree got to do with learning a language?..... Extra time and expense for no extra benefit......most 'soft subjects' people who are interested in it, have a passion to find out more about it, will do it because they are interested in it.....they do not require a degree to do that..... a few choice questions, or a short test can show if a person can speak another language or knows much about music, gardening, art or whatever......enough to do the job required.......we are all learning all the time, self taught in many cases.;)

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We have an employee with a fine arts degree, they answer the phone and lets us know when the ice cream van is outside.

I remember working with a customer service telephony parrot with a degree in aeronautical engineering....... Handy.

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What has a degree got to do with learning a language?..... Extra time and expense for no extra benefit......most 'soft subjects' people who are interested in it, have a passion to find out more about it, will do it because they are interested in it.....they do not require a degree to do that..... a few choice questions, or a short test can show if a person can speak another language or knows much about music, gardening, art or whatever......enough to do the job required.......we are all learning all the time, self taught in many cases.;)

Sorry mate, a Rosetta Stone dvd won't help you much in a meeting about accounting standards in Bogotá.

It is amazing to me how few native Brits can manage to do business in a foreign language, something which is a base level, bare minimum requirement for many of our south American and European peers and the effect on clients when they realise they can converse in their own language with the expensive British company they're thinking of hiring. Expectations in this area are so low that most south American and European firms just take it as a given you'll be speaking in English.

Of course, we've got dozens of economists and mathematicians with whole alphabets after their names but then so has every other one of our competitors. Language skills are a genuine differentiator.

Amazing the myopia that affects the UK in this field to the extent that some idiots seem to think looking up a few words from a phrasebook will be sufficient.

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Sorry but it is up to the employer to decide how well a potential employee speaks and/or writes in a specific language, doesn't take much to test that in a second job interview....whether it be selling timeshare in Spain or some high powered Chinese financial negotiation job in Shanghai.

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Sorry but it is up to the employer to decide how well a potential employee speaks and/or writes in a specific language, doesn't take much to test that in a second job interview....whether it be selling timeshare in Spain or some high powered Chinese financial negotiation job in Shanghai.

Well, quite.

But how do you think these prospective employees will learn a language? A couple of TED talks? Speaking from experience, the only way to gain fluency in a language is to immerse yourself in that language for a period of at the very least 6 - 12 months, preferably more. I self taught myself Portuguese by living in brazil for a year as a young man. However, in order to reach a level of proficiency required for business you also need to go back over and learn the grammatical structures required to speak and write in a professional context. An understanding of the political and historical background to your chosen language as well as a smattering of canonical texts (think Cervantes for Spanish, Jorge Amado, Miguel Torga for Lusophones) is also advisable if you don't want to come across as a complete ignoramus.

No mean feat to fit all that in if you're settled in a job with a young family. As a student though I managed to fit in a gap year and an Erasmus year (thanks for the grant, EU) (and ended up abroad after but that's another story) along with the level of study described above. Now I'm fluent enough in two languages to be trusted to carry out high level discussions with clients in those languages at a level that's way above my pay grade. That can't just be taught in a couple of weeks worth of after work classes, whatever your views on the university system are.

Accountancy, on the other hand, that's something you really can pick up on the fly (again, speaking from experience). If you want a great example of a truly superfluous degree, accountancy and finance would be it but no doubt many of you will see that as a 'proper' subject.

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To be fair, I don't know that you need to do a degree in a language. A lot of degree work is literature rather than the mechanics of the language (and I rather enjoy the mechanics bit).

You can sit independent tests to prove your competency, and if you pass you can include the results on your CV. I passed the DELF B2 test by studying French to A level, living in France for a year, then doing a year of once-a-week classes to polish up the French decades later.

If I wanted to get up to C1 and C2 I could do so by doing another two years of evening classes plus home study plus two or three conversation groups a week plus holidays in France. Which takes time and a certain amount of money and is not easy to fit in with full-time work and having a family.

To sum up, you don't need to do a degree, but you do have to expend a lot of time and effort and some money on it. To study a language from scratch, you have to be in a position to spend a prolonged period in a country where the language is spoken - and speak it, not hang out with Anglophones the entire time, as I've seen UK degree students do.

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I'm studying two languages and have been for several years on and off. I feel as though I have put in a huge amount of work but I'm still only at the stage where I can adequately go into a restaurant and have no problem ordering what I want. Completely true that for actual mastery of a language you need to be in an environment where you need to use it for actual daily living.

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Why does it have to be "one or other" re. subjects / learning ? Quite a UK-centric point of view, imo.

You'll find most engineers from the Eurozone under 40 speak very good English. They study the language all the way through their degree.

I studied French to A-Level, then spent next 5 years sitting in the UK and never visited France once. Still read / listened to French (pre-internet days so more difficult to find the materials and French tv via satellite was non-existent).

Got the opportunity to work in France for a year (IT) - chosen over a number of other UK based candidates as I had basic French and this would be useful ... living in France and commincating with workmates. Never returned to the UK after that.

Even learnt basic Spanish in 6 months as I had a lot of projects in Latin America in the pipeline. The French I had made learning Spanish fairly straighforward.

I think the UK should oblige all students to study a language from secondary through to end of degree. As for languages being "soft" ? Only if the university standards are low, will it be "easy" to graduate......

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