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SarahBell

Mobility Cars

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http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/10/disabled-people-fairer-test-mobility-pip

"As a result of the way the rule has been interpreted, thousands of disabled people have had to hand back their mobility vehicles – currently around 500 per week."


Under disability living allowance (the benefit Pip is replacing as it is rolled out across the UK), the relevant walking distance was 50 metres, which was the Department of Transport’s guidance on inclusive mobility and an established benchmark. The Pip distance of 20 metres – around the length of two London buses – is unrecognised in any other setting and so is pretty meaningless.

--

So PIP is more generous?

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http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/10/disabled-people-fairer-test-mobility-pip

"As a result of the way the rule has been interpreted, thousands of disabled people have had to hand back their mobility vehicles currently around 500 per week."

Under disability living allowance (the benefit Pip is replacing as it is rolled out across the UK), the relevant walking distance was 50 metres, which was the Department of Transports guidance on inclusive mobility and an established benchmark. The Pip distance of 20 metres around the length of two London buses is unrecognised in any other setting and so is pretty meaningless.

--

So PIP is more generous?

Less generous going by what you posted

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Mobility keeps people in car making jobs, keeps people moving buying stuff and paying taxes, fuel and vat...stops people being housebound and isolated......and if in the market of buying a secondhand car....ex mobility cars are often well looked after low mileage, a good value for money cash purchase. ;)

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2.6m cars sold in 2015. Approx 200,000 via Motability.

So potentially 100,000 cars no longer being bought. Best part of an immediate 4% drop for the motor industry. Ouch.

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Mobility keeps people in car making jobs, keeps people moving buying stuff and paying taxes, fuel and vat...stops people being housebound and isolated......and if in the market of buying a secondhand car....ex mobility cars are often well looked after low mileage, a good value for money cash purchase. ;)

And when the disabled driver drives like Mr MacGoo and runs over someone in their automatic car - more disabled!

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And when the disabled driver drives like Mr MacGoo and runs over someone in their automatic car - more disabled!

I can't imagine anyone blind is allowed to drive.

For those with mobilty problems, who want to get to work, a subsidised mobility car seems a good thing.

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http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/10/disabled-people-fairer-test-mobility-pip

"As a result of the way the rule has been interpreted, thousands of disabled people have had to hand back their mobility vehicles currently around 500 per week."

Under disability living allowance (the benefit Pip is replacing as it is rolled out across the UK), the relevant walking distance was 50 metres, which was the Department of Transports guidance on inclusive mobility and an established benchmark. The Pip distance of 20 metres around the length of two London buses is unrecognised in any other setting and so is pretty meaningless.

--

So PIP is more generous?

yes, the way the article is written re: change of distance diesnt make much sense. No doubt a screw up by the genius Guardian writer, whose opinions we must all listen to!!

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I can't imagine anyone blind is allowed to drive.

For those with mobilty problems, who want to get to work, a subsidised mobility car seems a good thing.

I would agree - but yet again it is overly generous. Which one of us, buying out of our own pocket, has a new car every three years.

And it isn't subsidised. It is free (unless you upgrade to the range rover).

Look who is involved and work out what it is really for :

'The largest fleet operator in Europe and the largest supplier of used cars in the trade, Motability Operations is owned by four major clearing banks – Barclays, Lloyds TSB, HSBC and the Royal Bank of Scotland.

Motability Operations’ annual turnover is around £990 million with assets worth £2.5 billion. Any surpluses are continually reinvested in the business. Motability Operations sells over 130,000 used cars a year and the company's car purchases account for approximately ten percent of total new car sales in the UK. Since the Scheme started, over three million cars have been supplied.'

source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motability

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I can't imagine anyone blind is allowed to drive.

For those with mobilty problems, who want to get to work, a subsidised mobility car seems a good thing.

Yes they can be a Godsend to many people, obviously you get the odd people who abuse the system but there seem to be a lot of people losing these cars now that genuinely need them.

If you were blind, you wouldn't be able to get a driving licence same goes for some forms of epilepsy. In fact if you're awarded a licence and you have any kind of chronic health problem, including psychiatric problems which require medication then often you have to reapply for your licence each year.

Personally I'm a believer in free bus travel to everyone anyway, the number of buses I see going around empty here is a real waste. I spotted 7 buses all of the same number go past me today almost in a convoy too lol.

I'm not a driver myself, wish I was though. It would give me a lot more mobility but alas it's just not possible. Can't wait for driverless cars. :)

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You would be permanently housebound if you had to rely on a bus or train in many areas......very many people can't get to work unless they can drive or know someone who can drive them. ;)

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You would be permanently housebound if you had to rely on a bus or train in many areas......very many people can't get to work unless they can drive or know someone who can drive them. ;)

There's also the problem of the bus stop not being near enough, if you have mobility problems. I'm sure there are some scammers out there, and motor companies may be troughing it, but for the people I have known who got these cars they were a real benefit. Actually somebody I know got a whole van with a wheelchair lift. I don't think that was entirely "free" and you had to keep if for a lot longer than the three years mentioned, because it was quite a specialist conversion.

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Mobility keeps people in car making jobs, keeps people moving buying stuff and paying taxes, fuel and vat...stops people being housebound and isolated......and if in the market of buying a secondhand car....ex mobility cars are often well looked after low mileage, a good value for money cash purchase. ;)

so would "retirement villages"

purpose built complexes for those of senior and/or limited mobility.

could have on-site shop,recreation facilities and paramedic..

all it would need is a house-swap arrangement from interested parties.

there is no need for these people to be alone and isolated,other than sentimentality.

I'm not talking about a 24/7 "care" home with coded locks and barred windows.....I am talking about well designed houses/bungalows on an estate with ramps in/out of habitats, easy access bathing/washing facilities, on-site handyman and a panic button with quick response medics just in case.

other than that, residents and relatives come and go as they please.

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No Mr Oracle. I don't think the slightly disabled want to live in a wheelchair ghetto.

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so would "retirement villages"

purpose built complexes for those of senior and/or limited mobility.

could have on-site shop,recreation facilities and paramedic..

all it would need is a house-swap arrangement from interested parties.

there is no need for these people to be alone and isolated,other than sentimentality.

I'm not talking about a 24/7 "care" home with coded locks and barred windows.....I am talking about well designed houses/bungalows on an estate with ramps in/out of habitats, easy access bathing/washing facilities, on-site handyman and a panic button with quick response medics just in case.

other than that, residents and relatives come and go as they please.

And the on site crematorium could provide all heat and power needs.

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There's information about who can get a Motability car here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/cars-and-wavs/

..and details of what you can get here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/Car_Price_Guide.pdf

Most cars have a cost shown of a few quid a week and a quick read of the text suggests that roughly £57 of that is met by the allowance and the rest on top is funded by the driver. So they aren't free generally, but they are far from expensive either for a new car.

I don't doubt that Motability helps people who would otherwise struggle to get around. What pisses me off is that life is a struggle for lots of people. A single childless 21 year old living in my city might earn £15k per year and can expect to pay £500+ pm in rent, so they have very little chance of owning a car too and if they do it will be cheap, old, unreliable. Do they get housing benefit? Do they get tax credits? Do they get a car provided at a vastly reduced rate? No of course not, they pay tax, NI, rent, and if it's a struggle then tough sh!t. They need two buses to get to work and it costs them a whole hours net pay, tough sh!t. Because they aren't a favoured group.

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There's information about who can get a Motability car here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/cars-and-wavs/

..and details of what you can get here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/Car_Price_Guide.pdf

I don't doubt that Motability helps people who would otherwise struggle to get around. What pisses me off is that life is a struggle for lots of people. A single childless 21 year old living in my city might earn £15k per year and can expect to pay £500+ pm in rent, so they have very little chance of owning a car too and if they do it will be cheap, old, unreliable. Do they get housing benefit? Do they get tax credits? Do they get a car provided at a vastly reduced rate? No of course not, they pay tax, NI, rent, and if it's a struggle then tough sh!t. They need two buses to get to work and it costs them a whole hours net pay, tough sh!t. Because they aren't a favoured group.

Spot on

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There's information about who can get a Motability car here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/cars-and-wavs/

..and details of what you can get here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/Car_Price_Guide.pdf

Most cars have a cost shown of a few quid a week and a quick read of the text suggests that roughly £57 of that is met by the allowance and the rest on top is funded by the driver. So they aren't free generally, but they are far from expensive either for a new car.

I don't doubt that Motability helps people who would otherwise struggle to get around. What pisses me off is that life is a struggle for lots of people. A single childless 21 year old living in my city might earn £15k per year and can expect to pay £500+ pm in rent, so they have very little chance of owning a car too and if they do it will be cheap, old, unreliable. Do they get housing benefit? Do they get tax credits? Do they get a car provided at a vastly reduced rate? No of course not, they pay tax, NI, rent, and if it's a struggle then tough sh!t. They need two buses to get to work and it costs them a whole hours net pay, tough sh!t. Because they aren't a favoured group.

Single indigenous men generally get a crap deal, when it comes to any state support. My father was saying that 40 years ago.

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Why are there so many more disabled spaces now in our local market, usually full of, I'm guessing, mobility cars? This just didn't exist 20 years ago. What changed? More people disabled now? Improvement in disabled rights or too generous a system?

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Why are there so many more disabled spaces now in our local market, usually full of, I'm guessing, mobility cars? This just didn't exist 20 years ago. What changed? More people disabled now? Improvement in disabled rights or too generous a system?

Not much more longer ago than that, I remember my shoolchum's uncle who had MS. He didn't get a blue badge. He had a pale blue 3 wheeler Invacar. They were expensive and were a rotten joke. :blink:

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Single indigenous men generally get a crap deal, when it comes to any state support. My father was saying that 40 years ago.

True but my actually my definition wasn't gender-specific. A single childless 21 year old woman would find things equally difficult.

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True but my actually my definition wasn't gender-specific. A single childless 21 year old woman would find things equally difficult.

Yes, you are correct.

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Chief exec Mike Betts received remuneration of over £1m. Is motability really a charity or a form of bank?

To add, I have a very good friend who really needs their motability car so I do understand the need, if not the method and sometimes over generosity. As with all these schemes it can and is played.

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Chief exec Mike Betts received remuneration of over £1m. Is motability really a charity or a form of bank?

To add, I have a very good friend who really needs their motability car so I do understand the need, if not the method and sometimes over generosity. As with all these schemes it can and is played.

I can't disagree with that statement. Nice work if you can get it. :unsure:

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1. It isn't free. You pay the mobility part of your disability living allowance - around £220 per month.

2. This isn't a lot different from a car lease scheme.

3. As stated above, it allows potentially housebound disabled people to becom economically active and contribute - in my case much more than the DLA that I receive.

4. When you can't walk far, you need a reliable car, not on that'll break down at the least provocation.

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There's information about who can get a Motability car here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/cars-and-wavs/

..and details of what you can get here:

http://www.motability.co.uk/Car_Price_Guide.pdf

Most cars have a cost shown of a few quid a week and a quick read of the text suggests that roughly £57 of that is met by the allowance and the rest on top is funded by the driver. So they aren't free generally, but they are far from expensive either for a new car.

I don't doubt that Motability helps people who would otherwise struggle to get around. What pisses me off is that life is a struggle for lots of people. A single childless 21 year old living in my city might earn £15k per year and can expect to pay £500+ pm in rent, so they have very little chance of owning a car too and if they do it will be cheap, old, unreliable. Do they get housing benefit? Do they get tax credits? Do they get a car provided at a vastly reduced rate? No of course not, they pay tax, NI, rent, and if it's a struggle then tough sh!t. They need two buses to get to work and it costs them a whole hours net pay, tough sh!t. Because they aren't a favoured group.

I would much rather be able to get rid of my disability and be earning £15,000. Try being disabled before you make such statements, VoR.

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