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Here you go guys your chance to build a New England

LAND in Russia’s eastern wilderness is being offered to disillusioned British people for free - as long as they can survive the frigid cold and barren Siberian landscape for five years.

The sprawling plots, which are 2.5 acres in size, are located in an enormous region stretching from the Arctic Circle to the Chinese border, where winter temperatures can drop to a chilling -47 degrees celsius and population density currently stands at three people per square kilometre.

But its not all bad news for adventurous house-hunters. The far east of Russia is famed for its stunning natural beauty, with hundreds of miles of rolling hills, grass plains and soaring mountain ranges. Known as the land where ice meets fire, settlers can look forward to hiking the snow-covered slopes of active volcanos or relaxing in hot springs.

Summers are also long and comfortably warm, with 25 degree temperatures providing the perfect climate in which to explore the region’s dramatic landscapes.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/668073/Vladimir-Putin-offers-disillusioned-British-citizens-free-land-in-Russia

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I reckon the afrikaans settlers in south africa should seriously look into this. Most are northern european stock and equipped for cold. Imagine how quickly south africa would collapse with no whites involved. That might sound shocking, but it is true.

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Would that be 2.5 acres of inhabitable land, or 2.5 acres of mosquito invested swamp?

And.... How much is the land value tax on that swamp.

Gift horse mouth etc... No free lunch etc...

Edited by Wurzel Of Highbridge

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It should be offered to native Russians first imho. Although the idea is good, Russia under Putin is incredibly undemocratic and a hunderfold more crony than anything here.

I reckon the afrikaans settlers in south africa should seriously look into this. Most are northern european stock and equipped for cold. Imagine how quickly south africa would collapse with no whites involved. That might sound shocking, but it is true.

Not shocked in the slightest. I've seen old videos of Mandela, and new ones of president Zuma singing "Kill The Boer". Heads of state openly calling for genocide (which is doubly daft as white s.a are the only motor of the S.A economy) Given this, I reckon this deal is very good for white south africans.

So if Glasnost had not happened, we could have been viewing "Homes under the Hammer & Sickle" ?

lol

And.... How much is the land value tax on that swamp.

Gift horse mouth etc... No free lunch etc...

Would be interesting to find out.

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Russia has a relatively tiny population for its immense scale, and most of that is concentrated in the west. you could probably rock up and 'claim' some land in the remotest parts and no one would even notice or care.

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I reckon the afrikaans settlers in south africa should seriously look into this. Most are northern european stock and equipped for cold. Imagine how quickly south africa would collapse with no whites involved. That might sound shocking, but it is true.

Seriously, do you have any idea how cold that part of Russia gets? Far colder than the Netherlands, which is primarily where they are from (a lot of the rest of them are of Huguenot decent).

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A remote area, where you have no connections, and where the climate is too harsh to farm? How many Brits would perish as soon as their car failed to get through to the nearest shop they might hope to find food and fuel? I expect there are large areas so remote there may be no shops as we know them. Like other marginal areas: polar and desert regions, for instance.

Didn't we have a similar story about Pitcairn a while back? At least there you'd be among English-speakers and a more forgiving climate.

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A remote area, where you have no connections, and where the climate is too harsh to farm? How many Brits would perish as soon as their car failed to get through to the nearest shop they might hope to find food and fuel?

We don't really know where the plots are being offered. It surely can't be that remote if you are expected to start a business. Khabarovsk is a huge city. The lowest average mean temp is in January at -19, which is quite doable. The -47 is an extreme . . . you simply wouldn't go outside then. You wouldn't last half an hour. On the other hand . . .

Eastern Siberia Oymyakon coldest village on earth. Temperatures drop to -71

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I have done interior British Columbia for a winter. ******ing Baltic but very doable.

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I have done interior British Columbia for a winter. ******ing Baltic but very doable.

Yes . . . worst thing about cold places is all the performance with furs and boots and earflaps. Then you go into a restaurant or somewhere and the heating is tuned up to 30.

Eastern Siberia isn't the greatest location though. If they'd said Western Siberia, they'd be talking. Very beautiful place.

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Yes . . . worst thing about cold places is all the performance with furs and boots and earflaps. Then you go into a restaurant or somewhere and the heating is tuned up to 30.

Eastern Siberia isn't the greatest location though. If they'd said Western Siberia, they'd be talking. Very beautiful place.

You been ?

Thing with extreme cold is it usually coincides with a big high pressure in these places - so little or no wind.

-36 in Canada actually felt less cold than Edinburgh at +5 with a strong Easterly wind. Strange but true.

Aussie bloke I knew over there confirmed the same - never felt colder than in Scotland - must be the moisture in the air or something - it goes right through you. Brutal.

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I did a short stretch of the Trans Sib . . . Lake Baikal and the mountains of Altai are stunning.

I agree totally about the cold. I was in Tatarstan once in January and it could be - 30 early morning. It certainly didn't 'feel like' - 30. And as long as you are organised it's OK. The kids have breakfast, walk to school, then have another hot breakfast when they get there.

A lot of people complain about the cold in England, but they simply don't wear the right gear. Few people wear hats these days, but you lose most body heat out of your head. It's always interesting to see old newsreels of London and commuters crossing London bridge. Everyone has a hat.

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I did a short stretch of the Trans Sib . . . Lake Baikal and the mountains of Altai are stunning.

I agree totally about the cold. I was in Tatarstan once in January and it could be - 30 early morning. It certainly didn't 'feel like' - 30. And as long as you are organised it's OK. The kids have breakfast, walk to school, then have another hot breakfast when they get there.

A lot of people complain about the cold in England, but they simply don't wear the right gear. Few people wear hats these days, but you lose most body heat out of your head. It's always interesting to see old newsreels of London and commuters crossing London bridge. Everyone has a hat.

My (swedish) late grandmother felt the 'cold' of English winter.

She was dressed for winter, and back home was 20 degrees colder. But since we don't have cold (nor hot) weather here, our houses aren't built for it. On the few days in a year when nature's temperatures go outside the comfortable range, we just get on with it. At least, until modern times, as the bottom of the 'acceptable normal' range seems to have risen by about 15 degrees in scarcely more years.

If you live with cold, you adapt to it. But it'll still kill you quickly if you get caught out unequipped. Whereas 'cold' in Blighty might feel less than comfortable but won't do you serious harm if your body is healthy to start with.

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But since we don't have cold (nor hot) weather here, our houses aren't built for it. On the few days in a year when nature's temperatures go outside the comfortable range, we just get on with it. At least, until modern times, as the bottom of the 'acceptable normal' range seems to have risen by about 15 degrees in scarcely more years.

Well, there you go. It's because we don't wear those yellowy, botany wool vests you used to get from Marks & Spencer. They were worth 15 degrees of anyone's money. :)

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I did a short stretch of the Trans Sib . . . Lake Baikal and the mountains of Altai are stunning.

I agree totally about the cold. I was in Tatarstan once in January and it could be - 30 early morning. It certainly didn't 'feel like' - 30. And as long as you are organised it's OK. The kids have breakfast, walk to school, then have another hot breakfast when they get there.

A lot of people complain about the cold in England, but they simply don't wear the right gear. Few people wear hats these days, but you lose most body heat out of your head. It's always interesting to see old newsreels of London and commuters crossing London bridge. Everyone has a hat.

Apparently the head heat loss thing is a myth. Only based on a study of US marines iirc and they didn't wear hats so the whole study was flawed.

^ This info was brought to you without the aid of Google !!

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I did a short stretch of the Trans Sib . . . Lake Baikal and the mountains of Altai are stunning.

I agree totally about the cold. I was in Tatarstan once in January and it could be - 30 early morning. It certainly didn't 'feel like' - 30. And as long as you are organised it's OK. The kids have breakfast, walk to school, then have another hot breakfast when they get there.

A lot of people complain about the cold in England, but they simply don't wear the right gear. Few people wear hats these days, but you lose most body heat out of your head. It's always interesting to see old newsreels of London and commuters crossing London bridge. Everyone has a hat.

We have wet cold, which sucks the heat out of you.

They have dry col, which is easier to dress for.

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Apparently the head heat loss thing is a myth. Only based on a study of US marines iirc and they didn't wear hats so the whole study was flawed.

^ This info was brought to you without the aid of Google !!

The reason you lose most of your body heat or if your head is because that is the one pay of your body that is not normally clothed, other than your hands. If you put in a hat and removed some other article of clothing, the other place would be where you lost most of your body heat.

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It's always interesting to see old newsreels of London and commuters crossing London bridge. Everyone has a hat.

I think that in London people used to wear hats to keep the pollution given off from coal fires out of their hair. Bowler hats in particular were hard wearing and good for this function.

But obviously they had the added bonus of keeping the wearer warm

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I did a short stretch of the Trans Sib . . . Lake Baikal and the mountains of Altai are stunning.

I agree totally about the cold. I was in Tatarstan once in January and it could be - 30 early morning. It certainly didn't 'feel like' - 30. And as long as you are organised it's OK. The kids have breakfast, walk to school, then have another hot breakfast when they get there.

A lot of people complain about the cold in England, but they simply don't wear the right gear. Few people wear hats these days, but you lose most body heat out of your head. It's always interesting to see old newsreels of London and commuters crossing London bridge. Everyone has a hat.

Most of siberia is under an anti-cyclone all winter. Which means very low temperatures, but generally very light winds. Dress up appropriately, and i wouldnt imagine its too bad.

I've never experienced -30 or 40, but in the cold spell of dec 2010, did experience near -20. -20 in calm conditions felt more pleasant than the usual UK cold snap of +2c, wet snow and driving winds.

For practical economic purposes (ie, farming, as they seem to want to encourage) its the length of the winter and frozen ground that would put off afrikaaners, rather than the severity of midwinter cold IMO.

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We have wet cold, which sucks the heat out of you.

I am sure nothing could suck through one of the old M&S botany wool vests. And I hadn't even started on flannel pyjamas.

Anyway, 'what to wear' in Eastern Siberia is probably covered in Vlad's 'Free Land' invitation leaflet.

Speaking of which, I haven't received mine yet. With a high percentage of 'disgruntled Brits' on HPC. I'd have thought we would be high up on the mailing list.

Think this story is genuine?

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I've known people who've gone to Moscow in winter, and they told me it was nearly unbearable. No doubt Siberia would be even worse.

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