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Gigantic Purple Slug

Car Tyre Worn ... Or Not ?

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OK, so last year at my car MOT they told me my two back tyres were worn and would soon need replacing.

I have the MOT coming up now and went out to check the tyres.

Basically nowhere on the tyre is the tread below the depth indicators, in fact the there is at least a mm or so free.

So were they trying to pull a fast one, or is the assessment on the indicators alone not appropriate and I'm not doing something right ?

It will be a real ball ache to take it into the MOT only to have to re-do it because of the tyres.

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It's in their interest to tell you things need replacing. I'm taking my car to the local council MOT centre, as they do not do repairs and so have no vested interest. Lots of anecdotal evidence to suggest that they pass cars that were failed elsewhere. Makes you wonder... :)

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I had the opposite last week. Took my car for an MOT on Wednesday, passed no problem.

Got a puncture on Friday and the tyre place showed me the tyre and it was virtually bald!

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These all sound in much much better shape than mine.

I pulled-over to ask a bloke directions the other day - and gave the poor sod thirty lashes...!

XYY

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It's in their interest to tell you things need replacing. I'm taking my car to the local council MOT centre, as they do not do repairs and so have no vested interest. Lots of anecdotal evidence to suggest that they pass cars that were failed elsewhere. Makes you wonder... :)

+1

More expensive for the actual test but you get a 1h time slot which I've not had deny'd yet and get a by the book test no trying to fill repair targets etc.

If you fail take it away, fix it and bring it back for a free partial retest.

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OK, so last year at my car MOT they told me my two back tyres were worn and would soon need replacing.

I have the MOT coming up now and went out to check the tyres.

Basically nowhere on the tyre is the tread below the depth indicators, in fact the there is at least a mm or so free.

So were they trying to pull a fast one, or is the assessment on the indicators alone not appropriate and I'm not doing something right ?

It will be a real ball ache to take it into the MOT only to have to re-do it because of the tyres.

Weren't you extolling the virtues of garages on a previous thread?

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Weren't you extolling the virtues of garages on a previous thread?

Ish.

i think garages are fine, but you need to keep them on a bit of a short leash and let them know you won't take any crap. There's a difference between getting the garage to do the job for you because its easier for them than for you - you could do the job but chose not to for various reasons, and being completely ignorant of the job being done.

Take changing tyres for example. DIY or garage - it's a no brainer. Unless you've got some sort of private fleet of vehicles.

Good to see most of the answers are as useless as mine normally are. A taste of my own medicine.

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OK, so last year at my car MOT they told me my two back tyres were worn and would soon need replacing.

I have the MOT coming up now and went out to check the tyres.

Basically nowhere on the tyre is the tread below the depth indicators, in fact the there is at least a mm or so free.

So were they trying to pull a fast one, or is the assessment on the indicators alone not appropriate and I'm not doing something right ?

It will be a real ball ache to take it into the MOT only to have to re-do it because of the tyres.

If they were worn right down to the indicators, they would need replacing.

You say they weren't yet. Hence the word 'soon' when they advised you. It seems like sound advice.

Best to replace them before they reach the legal minimum.

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'a mm or so remaining' is what people like kwikfit will call well worn out. To be sort of fair to them, to be safest in heavy rain you need quite a bit more than the legal minimum. But it is dry at the moment and you should be okay for MoT.

Funny things tyres - they're the one thing which really can make a difference re. braking and cornering (in emergency situations) yet people will let them run to the very edge and then buy some budget brand - yet those same people will insist on 5* safety ratings for their cars...

[not a personal jibe - you gain the same safety margins by just driving a bit more defensively]

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If they were that close to illegal at the MOT then they would have given you an advisory - ie. pass but with a note of items which will need attention.

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Yep, 1.6 mm over the central 75%. If you aren't touching the wear bars, you should be fine for the MOT.

However - the back tyres are not the place you want knackered rubber, even on a front drive car. Sounds counter intuitive, but if the back lets go suddenly, you won't catch it unless you are lucky, whereas the front tends to let go with controllable understeer.

I'd replace them - I tend to replace at 3mm. Having the car plane on a big puddle is worrying to say the least.

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OK, so last year at my car MOT they told me my two back tyres were worn and would soon need replacing.

I have the MOT coming up now and went out to check the tyres.

Basically nowhere on the tyre is the tread below the depth indicators, in fact the there is at least a mm or so free.

So were they trying to pull a fast one, or is the assessment on the indicators alone not appropriate and I'm not doing something right ?

It will be a real ball ache to take it into the MOT only to have to re-do it because of the tyres.

not necessarily just about tread depth.

if the sidewalls of the tyre are sufficiently worn/scuffed/bulges/brittle, that also counts as potentially dangerous and hence an MOT fail.

blow-outs at high speed aren't fun,So get it sorted.

if you choose to go down the part-worn route, some places will let you inspect/select the tyres you want to put on.

They should all be DOT/street legal, but you should be able to check for 3 things.

1) ALL writing/speed ratings/size etc should be visible on both sides of the tyre

2) no visible heavy scuffs/bulges

3) if you try physically flexing random bits of sidewall with your fingers, there should be no visible "separation",the rubber should all remain intact in one piece with no tears

ideally use the same type of tread/profile/speed rating on the same axle,and get them balanced(this is one bit where some part worn places will cut costs)

just off the cuff,can't say 100% accurate- please have a look for the real figures, but here's an example of tyre reading.

IIRC there is also a little circle somewhere in the tyre with "E" and a number next to it,try and make sure these match also

175/70 x 17 72H

175= tread width in mm

70= profile ( sidewall size is 70% the tread width)

17 wheel rim size

72= weight rating(in KG)

H = speed rating...H= 130MPH I think, R=114MPH, S=117 MPH, V=150MPH

edit.

here's the real deal.

http://www.bfgoodrich.co.uk/gb/advice/Find-out-all-about-tyres/How-do-you-read-the-markings-on-a-tyre

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We all travel different distances per year...soon to one driver who drives 30 k per year could be 6 months..soon to a driver who drives 10k per year could be next year. Either way I reckon it`s better to have good tyres with more than the minimum depth & of a high quality. Drive on a full set of new tyres and feel the difference.

It`s good to know you have decent tyres under foot, especially if driving on a motorway at 70 or 80 mph. Tyres are the most important item on a vehicle imho but so often overlooked as we need to get down and a tad dirty to really inspect them.

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Anyone inspect the tyres for sharp embedded stones? I usually take them out with a redundant key. Sometimes I find sharp shards of glass, and if I leave them in there, I will invariably get a puncture.

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If it's above the wear indicators across the whole of the tyre it'll pass the MOT no sweat. As others have said though, if you're down to below ~3mm tread depth, then the tyre will be far more prone to aquaplaning, or just losing traction cornering in very wet conditions. Whether you decide to replace it as a result is up to you; personally I tend to replace tyres when they're down to about that sort of level, not because I drive particularly fast, but because you don't know when you might have to emergency brake or swerve.

If you do replace them don't buy no-name cheapo tyres, they are regularly proven to be crap in tests. If you don't want to cough up for premium brand tyres then mid-range ones like Kumho, Toyo, Vredestein and the like generally provide 90% of the grip for 50-60% of the price of top end ones.

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Yep, 1.6 mm over the central 75%. If you aren't touching the wear bars, you should be fine for the MOT.

However - the back tyres are not the place you want knackered rubber, even on a front drive car. Sounds counter intuitive, but if the back lets go suddenly, you won't catch it unless you are lucky, whereas the front tends to let go with controllable understeer.

I'd replace them - I tend to replace at 3mm. Having the car plane on a big puddle is worrying to say the least.

Oversteer scares passengers, understeer scares drivers.

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Yep, 1.6 mm over the central 75%. If you aren't touching the wear bars, you should be fine for the MOT.

However - the back tyres are not the place you want knackered rubber, even on a front drive car. Sounds counter intuitive, but if the back lets go suddenly, you won't catch it unless you are lucky, whereas the front tends to let go with controllable understeer.

I'd replace them - I tend to replace at 3mm. Having the car plane on a big puddle is worrying to say the least.

Me too.

I tend to replace tyres in pairs at 3-4mm. In a FWD car that wears the fronts faster, I put the new tyres on the rear and move the part warn ones to the front.

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OK, so last year at my car MOT they told me my two back tyres were worn and would soon need replacing.

I have the MOT coming up now and went out to check the tyres.

Basically nowhere on the tyre is the tread below the depth indicators, in fact the there is at least a mm or so free.

So were they trying to pull a fast one, or is the assessment on the indicators alone not appropriate and I'm not doing something right ?

It will be a real ball ache to take it into the MOT only to have to re-do it because of the tyres.

I believe if you have a lot of cracking in the tyre side this is a sign you should replace them. So then its not just about the depth.

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