Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

spyguy

Why So Many Chiropractors + Osteopaths?

Recommended Posts

Walk round a couple of towns recently.

I reckon I saw 4 to 5 new, Chiropractors and/or Osteopath clinics.

Is back hoodoo voodoo the the 'Forever Living' scam for people who failed to get into medical school?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After having spent money with chriopractors and naprapaths, I finally realised the only people you should visit and give money to are physios (good ones).

Anecdote, GB Olympic rower's contract/sponsorship would get withdrawn if she ever used anything but a physio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Walk round a couple of towns recently.

I reckon I saw 4 to 5 new, Chiropractors and/or Osteopath clinics.

Is back hoodoo voodoo the the 'Forever Living' scam for people who failed to get into medical school?

Just a result of so many people being sat hunched over a computer 40+ hours a week for years on end and there being no effective treatment for the harm it does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Walk round a couple of towns recently.

I reckon I saw 4 to 5 new, Chiropractors and/or Osteopath clinics.

Is back hoodoo voodoo the the 'Forever Living' scam for people who failed to get into medical school?

In the US qualifying as an osteopath is a recognised route to practicing as an MD.

Anything that breaks the closed shop stranglehold that medics have is a positive

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a result of so many people being sat hunched over a computer 40+ hours a week for years on end and there being no effective treatment for the harm it does.

The treatment is physio and things like pilates (I had an incredibly weak body just 6 months ago). But a chiro would be more likely to treat the symptoms of having a weak body, and see repeat custom (in my experience).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a chiropractor occasionally and find it quite useful.

I know some go right into the voodoo stuff and all - but my one seems firmly focused on making sure things are aligned. Seems pretty sensible to me.

I find the idea that bones could NEVER be out of place and could do with someone who know what they're doing to crack them back into alignment - pretty ridiculous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The treatment is physio and things like pilates (I had an incredibly weak body just 6 months ago). But a chiro would be more likely to treat the symptoms of having a weak body, and see repeat custom (in my experience).

Im hovering around doing Pilates.

Im still a bit put off as it was thing for yummy mummies a few years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The treatment is physio and things like pilates (I had an incredibly weak body just 6 months ago). But a chiro would be more likely to treat the symptoms of having a weak body, and see repeat custom (in my experience).

Would agree with this - doesnt mean it can't have its uses though.

For example - you come off your bike and smack your hip off the ground or similar. You get it checked out and nothing is broken and all your mobility feels ok via a physio.

But it still feels a bit 'wrong'.

Surely there's a fair chance something has been knocked out of place - and getting it snapped back into place could help you immensely ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im hovering around doing Pilates.

Im still a bit put off as it was thing for yummy mummies a few years ago.

Done it for about 6 weeks now. Did Yoga before for over a year. Both fairly similar but pilates is more focused on the strength aspects with yoga more on flexibility.

I enjoy it. Lots of little movements that look easy - but ****** me they are hard work after a while. An hour can really be pretty hard work depending on what you do.

The breathing is the opposite of yoga though - which I find a little strange. I prefer the logic of the yoga breathing. Generally speaking when your body is 'opening' you breathe in. Makes sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to one once - after getting a bad back injury during a mugging. NHS did not want to know and I was barely able to move - much less ride my bike. Was recommended a chap in North London, and somehow managed to ride over there crouched down chest over the handlebars. While it was expensive and a bit voodoo he actually sorted it out in one session. I still remember the surprised look on the receptionist's face when I told her he'd said I didn't need a follow up appointment (he'd actually recommended five sessions). Clearly, she was used to regular custom - but I wasn't paying another £50. And I didn't bother buying the homeopathic medicine either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im hovering around doing Pilates.

Im still a bit put off as it was thing for yummy mummies a few years ago.

Find a geezer than does yoga, seriously thinking of doing this myself as my flexibility is crap. Guy who's class I think I will go to says he does the physical stuff and none of that ommmmn ommmm claptrap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The treatment is physio and things like pilates (I had an incredibly weak body just 6 months ago). But a chiro would be more likely to treat the symptoms of having a weak body, and see repeat custom (in my experience).

Yes, I didn't phrase that very well. The path to recovery is for the sufferer to change their habits. Physiotherapy, Pilates and Yoga can all help to set you on that path (if you are fortunate with the "teacher"). Ultimately the onus is on you to cure yourself. Alternatively, for a similar price there is a service that offers to cure you while you just passively lie there, and you will feel some (short term) gains immediately after the session. Large demand and short half life for external symptom treatment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Find a geezer than does yoga, seriously thinking of doing this myself as my flexibility is crap. Guy who's class I think I will go to says he does the physical stuff and none of that ommmmn ommmm claptrap.

A WEE bit of that claptrap in a yoga session is actually quite pleasant. I know some go way over the top though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would agree with this - doesnt mean it can't have its uses though.

For example - you come off your bike and smack your hip off the ground or similar. You get it checked out and nothing is broken and all your mobility feels ok via a physio.

But it still feels a bit 'wrong'.

Surely there's a fair chance something has been knocked out of place - and getting it snapped back into place could help you immensely ?

my physio, tlking during my many treatments after my accident, described the body as a ship of wood with no nails, just rigging holding it all up..the rigging being the muscles...in theory, getting the muscles right should straighten the bones...but she said for quickness, sometimes a bone moving technique speeds things up. I think there is merit in both approaches.

Of course, it was only recently that the medical profession viewed these treatments as ligit. they would recommend drugs, rest and boards under the bed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my physio, tlking during my many treatments after my accident, described the body as a ship of wood with no nails, just rigging holding it all up..the rigging being the muscles...in theory, getting the muscles right should straighten the bones...but she said for quickness, sometimes a bone moving technique speeds things up. I think there is merit in both approaches.

Of course, it was only recently that the medical profession viewed these treatments as ligit. they would recommend drugs, rest and boards under the bed.

Yeah, washing their hands helped too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my physio, tlking during my many treatments after my accident, described the body as a ship of wood with no nails, just rigging holding it all up..the rigging being the muscles...in theory, getting the muscles right should straighten the bones...but she said for quickness, sometimes a bone moving technique speeds things up. I think there is merit in both approaches.

Of course, it was only recently that the medical profession viewed these treatments as ligit. they would recommend drugs, rest and boards under the bed.

I am seeing a fair few Physios these days in muscoskeletal work. As above - some clearly see the merits of a bit of bone cracking here and there.

Tight muscles are certainly a major cause of many issues though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your skeleton is out of kilter then no amount of physio or osteopath work will sort the problem. You need the bones put back in place.

NHS docs are often very dismissive of chiros - much in the same way that they used to be very dismissive of physios until the NHS started hiring physios - and in countries like the US and many European countries doctors have no hesitation in recommending chiros when people have muscular-skeletal problems. In fact, many people go straight to chiros bypassing docs.

I think it is also worth pointing out that things like trapper nerves of vertaebrae seized up can give you no pain but can result in things like asthma, sinus problems, hayfever and other problems that people do not associate with bits of their skeleton being messed up.

My advice is simple - if you have a problem that your GP has not solved then consider going to see a chiro. It is a moot point - some people are happy to live in pain or with some of the illnesses I mentioned. Others are not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I walk my 2 year old male retriever 2 miles every day, and he has mullered every joint in my body. If i let him off he will run for miles.

Im about to book another session with a local chiropractor.

I have zero power in my left arm and a sore hip.

I will come away with power restored in arm and a non painful hip. Its a bit of a leap of faith when he gives the old neck a twist i must say.

Best £20 quid i could spend right now.

Ive tried physios and they just piss about with their fingers, whereas this chap gives you a bit of a hammering! A knee in the back is a classic move.

Problem is the more these things are "fixed", the more they need fixing. Or so i have heard.

Does anyone want a dog?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your skeleton is out of kilter then no amount of physio or osteopath work will sort the problem. You need the bones put back in place.

NHS docs are often very dismissive of chiros - much in the same way that they used to be very dismissive of physios until the NHS started hiring physios - and in countries like the US and many European countries doctors have no hesitation in recommending chiros when people have muscular-skeletal problems. In fact, many people go straight to chiros bypassing docs.

I think it is also worth pointing out that things like trapper nerves of vertaebrae seized up can give you no pain but can result in things like asthma, sinus problems, hayfever and other problems that people do not associate with bits of their skeleton being messed up.

My advice is simple - if you have a problem that your GP has not solved then consider going to see a chiro. It is a moot point - some people are happy to live in pain or with some of the illnesses I mentioned. Others are not.

+1. On my first visit to the chiro he did a test where he pushed down on my outstretched arms and you are to resist it.

Well, my left arm gave way like a pipe cleaner.

I didn't even know i had an issue there. I went in with a stiff neck/sholder due to the aforementioned hound.

No physio session prior had picked it up either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I walk my 2 year old male retriever 2 miles every day, and he has mullered every joint in my body. If i let him off he will run for miles.

Im about to book another session with a local chiropractor.

I have zero power in my left arm and a sore hip.

I will come away with power restored in arm and a non painful hip. Its a bit of a leap of faith when he gives the old neck a twist i must say.

Best £20 quid i could spend right now.

Ive tried physios and they just piss about with their fingers, whereas this chap gives you a bit of a hammering! A knee in the back is a classic move.

Problem is the more these things are "fixed", the more they need fixing. Or so i have heard.

Does anyone want a dog?

Where do you walk him? Maybe you need to venture further afield.

Take cover! Giant dog-eating owl on the loose in Devon

Pet owners in Devon have been warned after a huge escaped eagle owl which can eat small cats and dogs was spotted perching in a quiet street.

Peter Thomas spotted the bird, thought to belong to a falconer, on the roof of a house after he heard a "deep booming hoot".

Pet owners have been warned to keep an eye out, as the eagle owl is capable of devouring small animals and can take foxes and even small deer in the wild.

Peter saw a "strange shape" hunched on a roof at around 11pm in Elton Road, Exeter.

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/Giant-owl-loose-Devon-pet-owners-warned/story-29103750-detail/story.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blimey. Well Willow is 35kgs, i dont think he'd get him off the ground.

I have a friend who keeps a European Eagle Owl, rescued it from a zoo a few years back.

She's over 2 foot tall sat on a branch. I wouldn't mess with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dont forget all the mums who need to pay £50 to be trained how to massage their babies. Its the latest thing I hear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   73 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.