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Funn3r

Farmers Fear Brexit

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http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/62930f14-fd7a-11e5-b5f5-070dca6d0a0d.html#axzz45M5VYTav

This is on the front page of the paper version of the FT. I hadn't considered it before although obvious really - farmers depend on EU subsidies to such an extent that Brexit possibility has depressed both sales volumes and prices of farmland.

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The small sample of farmers I have asked for opinions on brexit were suprisingly on the fence about it. Generally they want to buy more land (landowners can often borrow very cheaply) and are only keen to sell for big payouts like residential development. Many are quite old, very conservative and inherently anti eu. They often want to pass the farm onto the next generation instead of selling up at retirement.

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Most farmers I've spoken to are pro exit. They see the money as being circular funding, and consider the EU as introducing draconian measures (like tagging or movement restrictions) that other countries don't bother implementing or policing. I've only spoken with livestock farmers, so I don't know the attitudes of arable.

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For small to medium farms the correct verb is subsidising, not Farming. They are joke orgs.

Wevesmall hill farmers. They be better off growing poinreapples than farming sheep. It would be cheaper too.

Smal sdcale farming is just a vast make-work scheme for EU sub.

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For small to medium farms the correct verb is subsidising, not Farming. They are joke orgs.

Wevesmall hill farmers. They be better off growing poinreapples than farming sheep. It would be cheaper too.

Smal sdcale farming is just a vast make-work scheme for EU sub.

Well said!

Agricultural version of the cup cakes business, with farm subsidies (rentier tax credits) thrown in for good measure

make them report to the Jobcentre every few weeks

I've no doubt many want to buy land. Borrow cheaply, get the State to run infrastructure to it, which is promptly captured as untaxed private wealth.

Once again homebuyers and tax payers as the mugs

Edited by RentierParadisio

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The small sample of farmers I have asked for opinions on brexit were suprisingly on the fence about it. Generally they want to buy more land (landowners can often borrow very cheaply) and are only keen to sell for big payouts like residential development. Many are quite old, very conservative and inherently anti eu. They often want to pass the farm onto the next generation instead of selling up at retirement.

Inherently anti-EU? I think that is pretty damn ungrateful considering the EU gives them something like £3.5B/year as a giant freebie.

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Inherently anti-EU? I think that is pretty damn ungrateful considering the EU gives them something like £3.5B/year as a giant freebie.

But they're not stupid. They know the EU is just sending money back that has just been sent over from the UK.

However, their gamble on brexit is that the UK government would cut out the middle man - This is by no means guaranteed.

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British agriculture will thrive if the UK leaves the EU, according to those farmers who say they will vote to leave in this summer’s in-out referendum. No longer constrained by EU membership, British farmers will be able to farm and trade more freely, and ramp up production to meet increasing global demand for food – as well as benefiting from more appropriate policies, says Cambridgeshire arable farmer Colin Barker.

Source :- http://www.fwi.co.uk/news/brexit-farmers-on-why-uk-farming-would-benefit-from-quitting-eu.htm

Ed Ford, chairman of Essex Young Farmers, attended the event in Brussels. He said: “26,000 Young Farmers have been assisted with funding in France and only 19 have been assisted in the UK. This is because none of the UK Administrations have implemented the Capital Grant Funding for Young Farmers.
“It is important that NFYFC and all of its members make clear to the Government that Young Farmers in other nations have access to up to 70,000 Euros of grant funding per year and yet Young Farmers in England and Wales do not.”

Source :- http://www.farmingmonthly.co.uk/news/9327-british-young-farmers-make-voices-heard-europe/

F**k the EU, they are hollowing out this country!

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Look what we've got though:

Commercial property - price decrease

Agricultural property - price decrease

London property - price decrease

What's not to like?

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EU regulations on farming are, as far as I can tell, one of the only benefits of the EU. I'm hoping that if we do leave, then we adopt many of the controls on livestock farming, animal abuse, etc. Example: outlawing of battery hens, live animal export restrictions, foie gras ban, veal crate ban, etc.

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I was talking to a farm machinery dealer yesterday. He was saying business quiet because of depressed grain prices and uncertainty of EU outcome. Seems to me most farms only survive on SFP. The business barely breaks even and all equipment is on tick.

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I was talking to a farm machinery dealer yesterday. He was saying business quiet because of depressed grain prices and uncertainty of EU outcome. Seems to me most farms only survive on SFP. The business barely breaks even and all equipment is on tick.

It needn't be that way. It's just that our wise leaders decided we should pay for food by taxation rather than cash at the farm gate.

Edited by LiveinHope

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If I thought that voting Brexit would kill farm subsidies, then I'd vote out twice and personally fill in the channel tunnel.

However I'm assured by someone-in-the-know that CAP would immediately be replaced with a more generous (and expensive to run) UK system, as not doing so would have a disproportionate economic impact, and because all the farmers/landowners are core Tory voters.

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If I thought that voting Brexit would kill farm subsidies, then I'd vote out twice and personally fill in the channel tunnel.

However I'm assured by someone-in-the-know that CAP would immediately be replaced with a more generous (and expensive to run) UK system, as not doing so would have a disproportionate economic impact, and because all the farmers/landowners are core Tory voters.

No it won't.

CAP 'works' because people think other countries I.e. Germany is paying for it.

Do you think a UK politician could stand up and make a case for giving 50 100k to small farms?

Suicide.

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Do you think a UK politician could stand up and make a case for giving 50 100k to small farms?

Just for the point of reference this is too high. Small farmers in the UK (say, about 150 acres pasture) will get about £15k in farm payments. Of course, they'll make money on their normal farming business on top of this. I'd happily accept that there is still an argument as to whether this is a good way to spend money...

Now, there are some farms getting way way more than this - plenty have subsidy payments into the millions - they are the huge landowners. I'd happily accept that there should be a rolling off of the subsidy for larger farms, or even a ceiling.

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Just for the point of reference this is too high. Small farmers in the UK (say, about 150 acres pasture) will get about £15k in farm payments. Of course, they'll make money on their normal farming business on top of this. I'd happily accept that there is still an argument as to whether this is a good way to spend money...

Now, there are some farms getting way way more than this - plenty have subsidy payments into the millions - they are the huge landowners. I'd happily accept that there should be a rolling off of the subsidy for larger farms, or even a ceiling.

The small famrs I know have more than than one subsidy.

Direct famr payment, high level, etc etc.

Then there's money from farming.

Then they get capital grants to convert barns into B+B.

We are p1ssing money away on a load of unproductive morons.

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I am a third generation tenant farmer. When the subsidy system we have today was brought in about 1990 or thereabouts, rents were about £40 per acre. Now they are £100per acre. In effect my landlord has got the subsidy payment all these years and not me ,all be it indirectly. If it hadn't been for this stinking subsidy system, I might have been able to buy my own farm. Instead the subsidy and the low interest rates have done exactly the same to land as it has to the housing market. I'm too old to want my own farm now, but I hope we have Brexit as I would like to see my landlord have to reduce the rents accordingly.

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Just for the point of reference this is too high. Small farmers in the UK (say, about 150 acres pasture) will get about £15k in farm payments. Of course, they'll make money on their normal farming business on top of this. I'd happily accept that there is still an argument as to whether this is a good way to spend money...

Now, there are some farms getting way way more than this - plenty have subsidy payments into the millions - they are the huge landowners. I'd happily accept that there should be a rolling off of the subsidy for larger farms, or even a ceiling.

what is odd, is that 200 years ago, before mechanisation, farms could feed the nation.

today, they cant do it without subsidy...

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I am a third generation tenant farmer. When the subsidy system we have today was brought in about 1990 or thereabouts, rents were about £40 per acre. Now they are £100per acre. In effect my landlord has got the subsidy payment all these years and not me ,all be it indirectly. If it hadn't been for this stinking subsidy system, I might have been able to buy my own farm. Instead the subsidy and the low interest rates have done exactly the same to land as it has to the housing market. I'm too old to want my own farm now, but I hope we have Brexit as I would like to see my landlord have to reduce the rents accordingly.

That sounds like the agricultural equivalent of Housing Benefit: artificially pushing up the cost of private rents - and thus land prices - whilst lining the pockets of landlords under the cover of helping tenants.

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That sounds like the agricultural equivalent of Housing Benefit: artificially pushing up the cost of private rents - and thus land prices - whilst lining the pockets of landlords under the cover of helping tenants.

You've got it in one there.

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If we left the EU it would wipe out farming across much of upland Britain... and there should be a dramatic impact on the rural economy - as for farmers being pro Brexit... sure, the not very bright ones!

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