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Flat Sharing In Your 40's Depressing Propaganda Article

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/life/flat-sharing-at-40-the-thought-of-owning-property-again-is-daunt/

Article goes on about how great it is to share a flat in 40s. Pretty depressing article that doesn't seem interested in addressing how we got into state where fully grown adults with no dependents cannot even afford a basic flat while holding down a full time job.

Edited by reddog

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the interesting thing in there that i spotted is the people dont want to own property anymore, they dont want to be in debt and are looking for alternative lifestyles. I think this is where the cultural zeitgeist is headed. Mobile populations living in new ways and dreaming up ever more elaborate schemes to get out the system. I already know a few folk making there living from the net so have no reason to tie themselves to one place.

I believe a lot of people are holding onto a dream that someone is going to come along and buy there house for stupid money but what if many people just thought that was stupid and chose a different route in life?

House prices would never recover just dwindle away and historians will reflect on what a stupid time this was.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/life/flat-sharing-at-40-the-thought-of-owning-property-again-is-daunt/

Article goes on about how great it is to share a flat in 40s. Pretty depressing article that doesn't seem interested in addressing how we got into state where fully grown adults with no dependents cannot even afford a basic flat while holding down a full time job.

As it ever was.

We had an old family friend. Worked all his life, was still working into his 90s. Never had more than a bedsit to live in. But his generation didn't have an HPC-style inflated sense of Entitlement.

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no one flat shares by choice.

Loved how one woman said that she could afford to live on her own but wouldn't be able to have the lifestyle she wanted so shares a flat to be able to go out more. In that case you can't afford to live on your own!

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We had an old family friend. Worked all his life, was still working into his 90s. Never had more than a bedsit to live in. But his generation didn't have an HPC-style inflated sense of Entitlement.

What did he do for a living?

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But his generation didn't have an HPC-style inflated sense of Entitlement.

Look how the HPC-style inflated sense of Entitlement kicks in in the early 2000s, just before the HPC forum really takes off - but you can see how the HPC-style sense of Entitlement totally explains the massive growth of the PRS.

Shoeshine%2B-%2BPRS%2Band%2BBTL.jpg

Aren't you a mathematician Porca? Not a statistician, I hope. What's with disparaging a whole forum, to which you've contributed over 17,000 posts, on the basis of a single old bloke?

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As it ever was.

We had an old family friend. Worked all his life, was still working into his 90s. Never had more than a bedsit to live in. But his generation didn't have an HPC-style inflated sense of Entitlement.

Sounds like your old family friend was Seriously Rich. It costs more to live in a studio flat than an HMO.

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What did he do for a living?

Journalist. Don't know in detail, except that he worked for Reuters and sometimes got my mother in to sporting events on a press pass.

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Journalist. Don't know in detail, except that he worked for Reuters and sometimes got my mother in to sporting events on a press pass.

Are you sure it wasn't some kind of Down and Out in Paris and London experiment that got out of hand? (The living in the bedsit that is, not taking your mother to sporting events). Also aren't you in your sixties? When was this guy born? If you think that the opposite of entitlement is a return to feudalism I think we can afford to raise our sights a little, surely.

547229.jpg

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Sounds like your old family friend was Seriously Rich. It costs more to live in a studio flat than an HMO.

Can't wait for the Telegraph piece trying to romanticise living in an HMO.

'William, 47, says that sharing a kitchen with a treadmill of similarly spiritually broken and destitute divorcees has been a lifeline. "I was never one for talking about my problems, but there's usually one or other of us slumped in front of the fridge, crying like a baby over how it came to this. You've got to talk them around or go without your yoghurt. It's really helped me open up. Also, there's usually a couple of drug-addled paranoid schizophrenics somewhere in the house - and when it comes to mental ill health, that helps with context. The fifteen Polish immigrant workers sharing a single room downstairs discourages burglars. There are always three of them in, any time of day or night, playing loud music and shouting,and keeping us safe."

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We had an old family friend. Worked all his life, was still working into his 90s. Never had more than a bedsit to live in. But his generation didn't have an HPC-style inflated sense of Entitlement.

So what?

I always think of these posts (below), when being told to be happy with your lot, and about HPCers 'entitlement'. And this back when house prices were just extremely painfully expensive bubble.

What's all the learning, the wisdom, and especially all the working for in life for - to productively contribute - if it doesn't lead to improving your own/family's situation? Prices are so extreme that a humble basic flat/house is totally out there for even couples, unless they can get past the lending checks and embrace huge debt. Well without some sort of inheritance of bomad help (which I hope gets taken down in a hpc) - imo.

That's great, really. Well, that's me told. <_<I'll just slave away comforting myself with the fact that I have a spiritual destiny that is beyond the hallmarks of worldly success like houses and children and a comfortable life, that I am not entitled to aspire to <_< Sounds like we're all regressing -- to the kind of society where the plebs lived under a starry-eyed brand of religious thought-control where they were told, and truly believed, that it was their destiny to know their place and not question their betters, no matter how hard they worked or how deserving they were; and must never question the fact that idle people lived nicer lives than them, no matter how undeserving. How great this country was then! Why they begrudged the unearned wealth of their betters was beyond reasoning! <_<

Only, where this used to be based on arbitrary hierarchies of birth, now it's determined by whether one seized the Great Moment and stepped on to the star-blessed Property Boat, after the departing of which all others must revalue the normal yardsticks of worldly success, renouncing all worldly aspirations and abjuring all "expectations", in order to support and sustain the Great Property Owners, whose material success we Must Not Question or aspire to. Otherwise we risk spiritual death, if we (heretics! burn them!) question the Great Property Orthodoxy, and fail to realise our place in the Great Scheme of Being.

Why, we should merely be content to serve the property owners, and should be grateful for our lot! Obviously, for me, the road to enlightenment and peace is that I must realise that the "hallmarks of success are mere illusions." I shall ponder this pseudo-Eastern wisdom from my cramped rented flat; and feel superior in spiritual destiny to my "friend" in her large comfortable house. Never fear, my disheartened HPC friends, we shall receive our reward for our privations after death! Let us comfort ourselves with that knowledge even as we subsidise the lifestyles of those with greater material wealth. We are the Elect.

Is that working better for you.....? blink.gif

thank you zoomraker! <_<

no-one is more aware than I am about finding happiness in small things. As I freely admit, I traded money and wealth to return to life of the mind (har har -- in reality, the life of petty politics and overgrown baby undergraduates, as other academics will confirm). I never expected to get so completely screwed out of the normal things in life -- a family, a house etc. All these exhortations to find pleasure in little things and be grateful for what I have -- well, bring some more coals to Newcastle, why don't you! I don't see why I shouldn't be pissed off. Bulls, shouldn't you be a little worried that the well-meaning suckers in life -- the teachers, nurses, social workers, young people in general -- are starting to stick two fingers up at society? What on earth is going to happen to all those materialist people when the non-materialist do-gooders like me start giving up and saying, you got it, chaps, I give up, selfishness and greed are the way to go? No more free public sector or low-paid vocational work for you. No more scholars, or nurses, or care home staff, or vicars, or charity workers, or police, or foster parents, or cancer researchers -- they'll all be deciding that on this evidence, they're better off trying to screw other people and the system and hang doing anything worthwhile for society when you can lie to buy a nasty flat and paint it magnolia and hey presto you've earned 100k in a year whereas actually work hard and care about things and you're f**ed.

Screw finding happiness in small things. I want to have a nice house and lie around all day watching daytime TV with my babies like my undeserving "friend". Why not?

I have some beautiful yellow daffodils that I tended myself from small bulbs in a window-box outside my office, and often I gaze at them for a while and admire their natural beauty, and think how wonderful the miracles of spring are. They can occupy me for, oh, a full 3 minutes at a time before I return to pondering the injustices of my 75-80 hour working week and my financial inability to attain a decent standard of living. It's nice to appreciate the lovely small things in life, but it's getting boring now. <_<

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I've said this before. There has been a ton of new student accommodation built in my town. Shared wifi, communal kitchens, cleaning. serviced rooms with a shower and so.

Its temptingly attractive. Indeed you can rent a room during holiday times

Back in the 60's had a dotty Aunt who was tone deaf. Had nothing but a tiny bedsit overlooking Huddersfield railway station. Washing facilities IIRC nothing more than a gas hot water geyser over a deep sink, and a curtain across.

Researching family history my 'great grandparents' were almost certainly sharing a house with other families when married around early 1900's Yeadon, Leeds.

Not saying I agree with it, but these times are probably coming back. To some extent space and living standards were set briefly post war with mass social housing building and now that is being swept aside and sold off, the slumlord attitude is coming back.

Edited by RentierParadisio

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Researching family history my 'great grandparents' were almost certainly sharing a house with other families when married around early 1900's Yeadon, Leeds.

Not saying I agree with it, but these times are probably coming back. To some extent space and living standards were set briefly post war with mass social housing building and now that is being swept aside and sold off, the slumlord attitude is coming back.

The HMOs are going to be full of bankrupt BTLers.

HPC.

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Apart from when I ended up with my name on all the bills, and losing out on a grand or so (not a big deal in the grand scheme of things) because I'd been too lax in collecting it from my flatmates when I moved out, I loved living in a shared place in my twenties, and would happily go back to it despite knocking forty if I hadn't found a great place to lodge instead when I moved across the country.

Lots of lovely liquid capital, 3 days a week working now and nothing to worry about. Different if you're in a family situation, but if that's not in the stars for you why bother anchoring yourself?

Everyone else can make their own decisions as venger says if they can stomach taking on the debt to fund a boomers cruise, or a Gen X'rs BMW. I'll fund my own Tesla.

Edited by Frugal Git

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I've got fifteen or so rentals all of which I charge out at vastly below market rate to my mostly grateful tenants (of course you always get the odd ungrateful herbert but thats the nature of the game we're in I guess).

One example of many I've got a single mum of two who only last year thanked me personally for coming round to fix the cooker when she smelt a gas leak, turned out it was just a loose pipe no big deal lucky I'm pretty handy with a spanner which means I don't need to pay for so called 'experts' to come round and fix things. If I did have to pay these so called 'experts' where do you think the money is going to come from to pay for a qualified gas technician? Thats right, by increasing my tenants rent. I don't want to have to increase the rents as I know most of them can barely scrape by month to month as it is. If I can help these poor people out by providing a roof over their heads at a price they can (just about!) afford then I can sleep soundly at night knowing I'm helping the housing crisis.

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We now have people in their 20s and early 30s sharing rooms in London.

In 10 years time the articles will be: "how sharing a room in your 40s keeps you young", and for "how liberating it is to share a flat in you 50s"

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the interesting thing in there that i spotted is the people dont want to own property anymore, they dont want to be in debt and are looking for alternative lifestyles. I think this is where the cultural zeitgeist is headed. Mobile populations living in new ways and dreaming up ever more elaborate schemes to get out the system. I already know a few folk making there living from the net so have no reason to tie themselves to one place.

She says she doesn't want to, doesn't really mean she doesn't want to.

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She says she doesn't want to, doesn't really mean she doesn't want to.

oh that satement just resonated with me becuase I know a lot of people now who have dropped out of the house buying game and are off to do other more interesting things. SOme are price dout but some could buy if they wanted but are choosing a different life path.

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