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Frank Hovis

Anyone Can Become Homeless

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This rang a few bells with people's experiences on here and is worth a read (IMHO - don't let me tell you what to do!) so I thought I wouldn't bury it away at the end of a long thread.

Everything going his way and then a sudden stroke at 36 and he ends up homeless and surprisingly the council won't help. You really never know what's aroudn the corner.

After serving in the Army and travelling across Australia, David spent seven years "loving life" in Plymouth working as a chef alongside the likes of the Tanners and Ben Shearn, before moving to London in 2007 to build his own successful business.

However in Spring 2011 David would encounter a moment that would flip his world upside down.

He explains: "I arrived at work on the busiest day of the year - Easter Sunday - and that's when my speech started going and my body went in my left side."

At the age of only 36, David was having a stroke. 999 was called and a passing ambulance was outside of his restaurant within two-and-a-half minutes, ensuring that he wasn't left devastatingly disabled.

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/STORY-went-Head-Chef-Treasury-living-streets/story-28881567-detail/story.html

From my experience most homeless people are not like this; but criminals, unemployables, drug addicts etc. But it genuinely can happen to Joe Normal too.

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Also ex servicemen like my son: 13 years service in the army, promised a home on leaving, still waiting ten years on. Not homeless because he lives with me.

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Also ex servicemen like my son: 13 years service in the army, promised a home on leaving, still waiting ten years on. Not homeless because he lives with me.

There has been the odd small effort to house homeless ex-soldiers as a priority but they never amount to much; the political will isn't there so nor is the funding. Houses are expensive to build.

I find that surprising as pretty much everybody that I know would support it as they would all the PTSD support that gets left to individual charities. A commitment to look after ex-forces would be a huge vote winner.

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This rang a few bells with people's experiences on here and is worth a read (IMHO - don't let me tell you what to do!) so I thought I wouldn't bury it away at the end of a long thread.

Everything going his way and then a sudden stroke at 36 and he ends up homeless and surprisingly the council won't help. You really never know what's aroudn the corner.

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/STORY-went-Head-Chef-Treasury-living-streets/story-28881567-detail/story.html

From my experience most homeless people are not like this; but criminals, unemployables, drug addicts etc. But it genuinely can happen to Joe Normal too.

I might be reading too much into the text but 'seven years "loving life" in Plymouth' would, to me, be caning it.

Very common among Chefs.

But, strokes can happen to anyone. But some people are higher risk than others.

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Unemployable? They should work on the buses, ohmless people are good conductors.

If they have the capacitance then why not, but I bet they still face resistance.

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Partying 7 days a week, hard drinking, colon cancer, HIV, Crystal Meth, decided to go from Plymouth to London to do an "art degree"

Couldn't pay the rent went to the local council (in london i presume?) and they turned him away.

You don't just decide to go to another area of the country and demand the council there house you.

You will be redirected back to the council in the area where you have resided for most of your life.

But yes anyone can become homeless

very easily infact if you are on jsa and forced to take a take a zero hr job that doesn't provide a stable income.

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You get hit by a car. The driver is uninsured. Or you have a stroke. Or your business goes bust. But don't worry, your own insurance will pay.

Except insurance companies will wriggle out if they can, or perhaps you were mis-sold PPI...

People don't realise they could be one phone call, one tyre squeal, away from homelessness. It can happen to anyone, not least the people who don't think it could happen to them.

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The arrogance of the living...see it on the telly with all the "success" in HUTH and other property shows...

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From my experience most homeless people are not like this; but criminals, unemployables, drug addicts etc.

Is that a "chicken and egg" situation though? If you end up cold and on the streets, booze and/or drugs may be the only prop you have to keep going...

As for "unemployable" that is often just a case of getting a bit older and the employers/agencies choosing someone from their target group. Most jobs I see advertised where I live are for bar staff/waitresses etc. I doubt you'd have much chance of getting such a job if you were over 40 regardless of your skills and aptitude.

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Is that a "chicken and egg" situation though? If you end up cold and on the streets, booze and/or drugs may be the only prop you have to keep going...

As for "unemployable" that is often just a case of getting a bit older and the employers/agencies choosing someone from their target group. Most jobs I see advertised where I live are for bar staff/waitresses etc. I doubt you'd have much chance of getting such a job if you were over 40 regardless of your skills and aptitude.

No. For whatever reason a high percentage are difficult, aggressive, and impossible to get along with. You would not employ them.

Then there is another big chunk who just cannot cope, the workers do their best but they know that as soon as they aren't being looked after they will be taken advantage of: mugged, molested, bullied. Too weak and too trusting for adult life. Again unemployable.

There are quite a few who, on meeting, you cannot believe are homeless. Bright, helpful, eager to improve themsleves. Then they have a drink or drugs relapse and go out of control and you understand why they're homeless. Employable but only for short periods.

Then there is the smaller strand like this chef whose lives have suddenly gone wrong for some reason. These generally with a little help can get put back on their feet and are the success stories.

I don't dismiss your point about jobs being harder to get the older you are. I know someone in their mid 50s with no specific qualifications or skills but fit and strong and very personable. He lost his job (sports coach) basically because he was getting a bit old for it. He's gone for so many different jobs and got none of them. I can think of loads of jobs he would be excellent at but until he gets a chance he won't be able to. I've recruited several people in their 50s but all with relevant experience; to be a new starter in something at that age is very hard.

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There has been the odd small effort to house homeless ex-soldiers as a priority but they never amount to much; the political will isn't there so nor is the funding. Houses are expensive to build.

I find that surprising as pretty much everybody that I know would support it as they would all the PTSD support that gets left to individual charities. A commitment to look after ex-forces would be a huge vote winner.

Fortunately my son has escaped both physical and mental injury I guess that is the great consolation. I agree that to reiterate the commitment, made in the '90s, to house all ex servicemen and women would be a very popular, vote-winning move for any political party that thought to do it. Certainly, service leavers are told they'll be housed when doing their resettlement courses. He is working full time at crap wages.

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I guess ex-servicemen are used to having their lives organised. I've worked with a few. Some fall into that camp. Others get on with civilian life excellently. They usually have a good pension deal. Anyone can have a tragedy, or a breadown, at least temporarily.

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I guess ex-servicemen are used to having their lives organised. I've worked with a few. Some fall into that camp. Others get on with civilian life excellently. They usually have a good pension deal. Anyone can have a tragedy, or a breadown, at least temporarily.

Richest person I know is an ex-serviceman. Military pension (full pension from 50), plus another public-sector pension from the job he went into on retiring from the military.

They get pay while working and pension most of us could only dream of. Where does this idea that they should get free houses after leaving the job on top of that come from? Which of my former employers should I turn to for that deal?

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