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libspero

Iplayer To Go Behind Paywall (Or Be Made Illegal Without License)

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Paywall is the answer. Then people can decide whether they want to pay for it. :blink:

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In other news.. is anyone else finding the forum laggy today?

Mods, would you mind deleting the other two threads please..

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In other news.. is anyone else finding the forum laggy today?

Mods, would you mind deleting the other two threads please..

~

I thought it was my computer.

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In his keynote speech, Mr Whittingdale said: "Having discussed this with the BBC and the BBC Trust, I will be bringing forward, as soon as practicable, secondary legislation which will extend the current TV licensing regime, not only to cover those watching the BBC live but also those watching the BBC on catch-up through the iPlayer."

Is good. He is differentiating the BBC from other broadcasters. I won't pay to fund the BBC's bias but I don't see why that should prevent my watching 4OD for example. This looks hopeful for it being restricted to BBC iPlayer which, whilst I do watch and enjoy the odd programme (The Night Manager is worth a watch), I could perfectly well do without.

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Is good. He is differentiating the BBC from other broadcasters. I won't pay to fund the BBC's bias but I don't see why that should prevent my watching 4OD for example. This looks hopeful for it being restricted to BBC iPlayer which, whilst I do watch and enjoy the odd programme (The Night Manager is worth a watch), I could perfectly well do without.

And what are the chances of that, I wonder. I am very suspicious and suspect that it will end in an internet connection tax, being the easiest system to implement.

Culture secretary seems like a reasonable guy though, here's his thoughts on ad-blocking software from a Wail article also covering the Beeb proposals:

Ad-blockers are a 'protection racket' and content will disappear if media companies can't make money, Culture Secretary admits

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3472967/The-BBC-iPlayer-loophole-lets-viewers-watch-programmes-without-licence-closed-months.html#ixzz41mOEveyt

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

The Government could intervene over online ad-blockers, the Culture Secretary said today.

John Whittingdale said he shared the concern about the impact of the software - which hides adverts on websites automatically - had on industries from music to news.

He told the Oxford Media Convention research suggested the public advertising funded media but objected to instrusive advertising.

But the Secretary of State said ad-blockers were running what some saw as a 'modern day protection racket'.

And he warned: 'If people don't pay in some way for content, then that content will eventually no longer exist.

'And that's as true for the latest piece of journalism as it is for the new album from Muse.'

Mr Whittingdale continued: 'What (consumer) dislike is online advertising that interrupts what they are doing. They don't like video or audio that plays automatically as soon as a web page has loaded.

'Or pop-ups that get in the way of their browsing experience.'

The Culture Secretary added: 'If we can avoid the intrusive ads that consumers dislike, then I believe there should be a decrease in the use of ad-blockers.

'I am not suggesting that we should ban ad-blockers but I do share the concern about their impact.

'And I plan to host a round table with representatives from all sides of the argument to discuss this in the coming weeks.

'Once I have heard their views, I will consider what role there is for Government.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3472967/The-BBC-iPlayer-loophole-lets-viewers-watch-programmes-without-licence-closed-months.html#ixzz41mNOBdwx

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Trust this guy?

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Culture secretary seems like a reasonable guy though, here's his thoughts on ad-blocking software from a Wail article also covering the Beeb proposals:

"Ad-blockers are a 'protection racket' and content will disappear if media companies can't make money, Culture Secretary admits"

Trust this guy?

I thought that deserving of a separate thread.. but thought I'd wait a bit.

Banning AD blockers seems a major encroachment of civil liberties to me.

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People who complain about ad blockers are massive hypocrites. They complain about people watching stuff without somehow contributing, but expect to get paid to show ads to people who'll react badly enough to them that they go out of their way to block them, which is even more unjustly helping themselves to the advertiser's money.

As for iplayer, free with a licence, can pay (without getting a full licence) to watch it without seems fair enough.

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This is the way it works. People invent a new nice thing, they find find a way to tax it, people move on to the next thing.

They'll tax the internet - it's the new version of TV.

If we're lucky it'll just be a tax per household. If we're unlucky it'll be a per connection charge.

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This really starts turning the BBC into a kind of Netflix though as far as a younger generation is concerned. With this type of model just how much must see content does the BBC have that would lure viewers into paying the full subscription. With Top Gear gone I'm just not sure there's that much at all. Ok people do watch Dr Who and Sherlock but the bottom line is they're not up to par with the big US shows.

And as for the rest, 'I really must buy that One Show DVD boxset' said no-one ever.

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And as for the rest, 'I really must buy that One Show DVD boxset' said no-one ever.

I don't know.. my wife just bought the Downton Abbey box set.

Pretty sure that's grounds for divorce on the basis of unreasonable behavior :unsure:

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Hate to go against the flow, but... I think the BBC could be on to a winner here.

The BBC is popular abroad - believe it or not, UK tv is generally very good by international standards. I myself would happily pay a subscription to iPlayer, but I can't. Strictly verbotten.

So there's a big market for uk-based proxy servers who allow - for a fee - people abroad to hook into iPlayer.

If the iPlayer goes behind a paywall, then it's a small step to open it up to the entire planet, which makes the UK market of 60 million or so look minute.

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Hate to go against the flow, but... I think the BBC could be on to a winner here.

The BBC is popular abroad - believe it or not, UK tv is generally very good by international standards. I myself would happily pay a subscription to iPlayer, but I can't. Strictly verbotten.

So there's a big market for uk-based proxy servers who allow - for a fee - people abroad to hook into iPlayer.

If the iPlayer goes behind a paywall, then it's a small step to open it up to the entire planet, which makes the UK market of 60 million or so look minute.

That's not going against the flow, that's great.

The fact that I won't be buying it does not make me want it to be a failure.

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Hate to go against the flow, but... I think the BBC could be on to a winner here.

I think many agree with you.

My only concern would be if they fail to restrict access and then criminalise people who watch it without a license.

I think the Netflix style system is a great idea. If it is reasonably less than the price of the normal license fee I might even pay it. I barely watch it, but it would be nice to have the option every now and again for a modest fee.

Your point about opening it up to global markets is a great one as well.. though to be honest I suspect it would probably only be watched by a few expats.

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They'll tax the internet - it's the new version of TV.

If we're lucky it'll just be a tax per household. If we're unlucky it'll be a per connection charge.

That's exactly what they did in Germany, in 2013 they introduced a per household TV license every household has to pay regardless whether you have a receiving device or not.

This is developing into the most hated tax ever, almost 10% of German households are refusing payment (which is without precedents in Germany as Germans are generally very law abiding when it comes to taxes) and the courts are clogged up with debt enforcement cases.

A recent representative survey found that 70% are against this TV tax:

Umfrage zu Rundfunkgebühren: Große Mehrheit der Deutschen will für Öffentlich-Rechtliche nicht mehr zahlen - FOCUS Online

Meanwhile another survey found that the average public TV viewer in Germany is 60 years old. In other words practically nobody under 30 watches public TV channels (but still has to pay the TV tax).

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Good. Hopefully prevents tiresome retards from complaining about the license fee while simultaneously criticising the new Top Gear. Win win win.

Unfortunately I doubt I'll be in a position to criticise the new Top Gear.. Can't see I'll be forking out for an Amazon subscription.

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