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cashinmattress

Uk Consumes Far Less Stuff Than Decade Ago

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http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/feb/29/uk-consumes-far-less-ons-crops-energy-metals-average-material-consumption

From crops to energy and metals, average material consumption fell from 15 tonnes in 2001 to just over 10 tonnes in 2013

The amount of stuff Britain consumes has fallen dramatically since 2001, according to official government figures.

The Office for National Statistics data reveals that on average Britons used 15 tonnes of material in 2001 compared with just over 10 tonnes in 2013.

The figures look at the total amount of biomass (crops, wood and fish), coal, oil and gas, metal, and non-metallic minerals (such as construction materials) used in the UK every year.

Even the total weight of biomass consumed in Britain has fallen, despite a rising population.

The ONS said that in 2000 Britain chomped and burned its way through 188m tonnes of crops, fish and wood, compared with 172.5m million in 2013, the last year for which figures are available.

Fossil energy consumption peaked in 2001 at 283m tonnes. In in 2012 it was 249m tonnes, although this was an increase on the lows of 2008-09.

But the country’s environmental accounts can be interpreted in many ways.

The switch to a service-based economy rather than a manufacturing one means Britain consumes far less materials and energy for every unit of economic output compared with economies such as Germany.

Hmmm. That's pretty significant.

And it proves that we have been saved by the banks and insurance companies.

Why waste good electricity on fickle matters like steel mills?

The figures also show a sharp decrease in the amount of construction materials used in Britain – which probably may reflect the fall in housebuilding and infrastructure spending rather than improved efficiency.

The volume of non-metallic minerals used in the UK fell from 321m tonnes in 2000 to 212m tonnes in 2013.

This includes goods such as sand, gravel, limestone and gypsum used in housebuilding and construction.

The physical weight of goods imported into the UK has actually risen over the past 13 years, while the amount exported has fallen.

“More materials are imported than exported and the gap between imports and exports has widened over the 2000 to 2013 period,” said the ONS.

Who needs exports and the associated jobs when we can print our way to prosperity forever?

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No surprise at all, everyone is spending so much of their income on housing they don't have any money left to buy 'stuff'.

Im not...I just stopped spending because of the lack of value for money and as a protest to corporate britain.

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No surprise at all, everyone is spending so much of their income on housing they don't have any money left to buy 'stuff'.

Yes, I wonder how many are "property rich but cash poor" right now?

Maybe those times of home owners using their properties as cash cows through equity release has slowed down?

And of course rents are so high now, the average tenant has been left with less disposable income.

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No surprise at all, everyone is spending so much of their income on housing they don't have any money left to buy 'stuff'.

.....in the past technology and labour saving devices made a big impact on improveing the quality of life ....today only a minute impact/upgrade not enough to make a difference......in fact going backwards is today as much a life style quality improvement as going forwards......less becomes more. ;)

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Not food they aren't

They are spending less but eating more....more of the wrong foods such as processed foods made in food processing plants using cheap sugars salt and fats, and food that has traveled many air miles in climate controlled transport and storage .......keep it local, keep it seasonal, keep it fresh and natural...... ;)

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The more you have to pay for a roof over your head, be it mortgage payments or rent, the less you have to spend on other things. The housing bubble has killed more small businesses and Pubs I bet than any other factor over the past 10 years. The Housing Bubble has created a very frugal generation, the only extravagant purchases nowadays are probably upgrading your phone at an added cost of an extra £5 per month on your contract.

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Could it be partly because people buy digital music books etc now?

Ah, but one hard copy book can be picked up for less than a pound and tens of people can share, swap and borrow read it..... ;)

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Could it be partly because people buy digital music books etc now?

Maybe. But it all boils down to how you qualify consumption and the greater energy equations.

Less CD's is less hydrocarbon based plastic for media.

More MP3's requires more draw from the grid and associated fuel burned, more fancy gadgetry and associate rare earth elements.

However, people are changing phones/ipods at a much quicker pace then they did with say a walkman CD or tape based media player.

More people than ever listening to portable audio devices.

All recharging more frequently.

It's all very complicated to calculate, and as such is full of red herring arguments.

Like electric cars will save on hydrocarbon fuel. That's BS.

Average internet user burns 180 watt hours / month (60 watt light bulb for 3 hours) apparently.

More internet users than ever.

Sigh.

energy-use-by-sector.png

Edited by cashinmattress

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The more you have to pay for a roof over your head, be it mortgage payments or rent, the less you have to spend on other things. The housing bubble has killed more small businesses and Pubs I bet than any other factor over the past 10 years. The Housing Bubble has created a very frugal generation, the only extravagant purchases nowadays are probably upgrading your phone at an added cost of an extra £5 per month on your contract.

Only £5 a month....that is £60 quid a year........should be looking to reduce it by £5 a month and save an extra £5 a month....how long does it take to save up a deposit? ;)

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Well, how poor are we?

Lots of stats to prove we're not. But it shows rising inequality is clearly crimping down on broader demand.

We are not at all. The poorest Brit is richer than 90% of the worlds population.

Hence why the world's real poorest peoples are clambering over themselves to get a chance to be 'poor' in the UK.

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We are not at all. The poorest Brit is richer than 90% of the worlds population.

Hence why the world's real poorest peoples are clambering over themselves to get a chance to be 'poor' in the UK.

If our cost of living, mainly housing was not so high that low paid 'hard working' workers have to be subsidised with tax credits and housing subsidies to live we would be on more of a level playing field with the rest of Europe and to a greater degree the world. ;)

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We are not at all. The poorest Brit is richer than 90% of the worlds population.

Hence why the world's real poorest peoples are clambering over themselves to get a chance to be 'poor' in the UK.

In monetary terms.

I'd define the poorest brit as someone who struggles to pay for necessities every month. How many people does that really apply to in the world? Maybe 20%? Certainly not 50%.

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Only £5 a month....that is £60 quid a year........should be looking to reduce it by £5 a month and save an extra £5 a month....how long does it take to save up a deposit? ;)

TBH I find even 5 quid a month expensive. Im on 3 where its 1p mb, 2p text, 3p voice. 5 quid usually lasts me 3 months.

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Like electric cars will save on hydrocarbon fuel. That's BS.

The maths is quite simple; If every household had a Nissan Leaf with a 30kW battery and they got home from work, put it on 'fast' charge at 10kWh for a couple of hours we have a peak demand excluding all other electric uses; 25M households times 10kW = 250gW or 5 times the capacity of the grid. Electric rechargeable cars are not the answer.

Since the advent of mobile phones and gadgets overnight base power consumption in my house has risen from 150W to 250W and that is with me going round switching lots of stuff off every night.

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In monetary terms.

I'd define the poorest brit as someone who struggles to pay for necessities every month. How many people does that really apply to in the world? Maybe 20%? Certainly not 50%.

You lot need to travel more.

Poor brits still have food banks, NHS, libraries, clean water, world class IT infrastructure, mandated childhood state education, amazing levels of personal and financial security and a still good (if somewhat broken) benefits system.

Poor yanks get feck all from their government in comparison.

World population; 7.2 billion.

UK population: 64 million (less than 1%)

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World population; 7.2 billion.

UK population: 64 million (less than 1%)

Yes. This is why we need to work very hard to keep the riff-raff/migrants/scum out of the country and away from our borders.

They want our stuff.

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You lot need to travel more.

Poor brits still have food banks, NHS, libraries, clean water, world class IT infrastructure, mandated childhood state education, amazing levels of personal and financial security and a still good (if somewhat broken) benefits system.

Poor yanks get feck all from their government in comparison.

World population; 7.2 billion.

UK population: 64 million (less than 1%)

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.....in the past technology and labour saving devices made a big impact on improveing the quality of life ....today only a minute impact/upgrade not enough to make a difference......in fact going backwards is today as much a life style quality improvement as going forwards......less becomes more. ;)

Won't hear me arguing with that, despite the number of times I get stupid "want to live in the dark ages?" type replies when I point this out, with people telling me how technological advancement was so great bceause it got us out of that so is equally good now.

The maths is quite simple; If every household had a Nissan Leaf with a 30kW battery and they got home from work, put it on 'fast' charge at 10kWh for a couple of hours we have a peak demand excluding all other electric uses; 25M households times 10kW = 250gW or 5 times the capacity of the grid. Electric rechargeable cars are not the answer.

Since the advent of mobile phones and gadgets overnight base power consumption in my house has risen from 150W to 250W and that is with me going round switching lots of stuff off every night.

It'll still work if local storage is possible (possibly only practical in newbuild), storing up the energy during the day to be used to recharge the car in the evening. It would also allow faster recharges but would be less efficient overall, and people might not want a big pile of old batteries or huge capacitors or flywheels (I've really not done the sums on the practicality of this idea) under their house.

If it is practical it would have benefits beyond cars.

Edited by Riedquat

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