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Teachers Leaving In Droves


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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-35660457

Last year more people left to teach abroad (18,000) than trained (17,000) on post-graduate routes, he adds.

So what's the answer?

Mega discount on their student fees if they stay and teach in the UK for 10/15/20 years?

(I think it's Malaysia that pays for students to do a degree in the UK on condition they work for the govt for so many years after)

You could do the same with doctors and degrees?

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-35660457

Last year more people left to teach abroad (18,000) than trained (17,000) on post-graduate routes, he adds.

So what's the answer?

Mega discount on their student fees if they stay and teach in the UK for 10/15/20 years?

(I think it's Malaysia that pays for students to do a degree in the UK on condition they work for the govt for so many years after)

You could do the same with doctors and degrees?

Or you could look at why they're leaving. 30 years of rejigging and top down bureaucracy and meddling for a start.

Oh and the instant removal of any market place philosophy in both Education and Healthcare

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Or you could look at why they're leaving. 30 years of rejigging and top down bureaucracy and meddling for a start.

Oh and the instant removal of any market place philosophy in both Education and Healthcare

They're getting paid a fair bit less, in real terms, to what they were getting, all sorts of subtle new contracts, reapplying for their job, restructuring, and just plain zero wage inflation

I'm not a fan of them, but in any workplace, if you want to retain staff you need to make it worth their while, as a function of their workload and responsibility

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Or you could look at why they're leaving. 30 years of rejigging and top down bureaucracy and meddling for a start.

Oh and the instant removal of any market place philosophy in both Education and Healthcare

OK, lets just pay anybody who works in Education or Healthcare a million pounds a year because they're so caring that they deserve to be put on a pedestal for their selfless moral superiority.

In fact let's have all wages in the UK set by a central committee based upon their subjective moral judgement of each role :)

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Or you could look at why they're leaving. 30 years of rejigging and top down bureaucracy and meddling for a start.

Oh and the instant removal of any market place philosophy in both Education and Healthcare

And - the biggest Elephant Mammoth in the Room..........

ABSURDLY HIGH HOUSE PRICES

Dur.....

Edited by eric pebble
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Or you could look at why they're leaving. 30 years of rejigging and top down bureaucracy and meddling for a start.

Oh and the instant removal of any market place philosophy in both Education and Healthcare

I know a few teachers. The main problems appear to surround the notion that teachers enter the profession to teach, make a difference to their local community, and help children.

They consider leaving because they can do only a minimal amount of the above due to continually moving goalposts and excessive bureaucracy.

The kids come last. That's a long way from the idealism teachers believe teaching is there for.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-35660457

Last year more people left to teach abroad (18,000) than trained (17,000) on post-graduate routes, he adds.

So what's the answer?

Mega discount on their student fees if they stay and teach in the UK for 10/15/20 years?

(I think it's Malaysia that pays for students to do a degree in the UK on condition they work for the govt for so many years after)

You could do the same with doctors and degrees?

Cheap QUALITY housing and affordable cost of living !!!!!

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Teaching today is incomparable with what it was like 20 years ago.

Both my parents taught. They never worked for more than an hour after pupils had left school and my mum did an occasional half an hour on a Sunday night getting together materials for her class. It was a good job.

Now several of my friends and cousins teach. They work an extra couple of hours every day, at least one day at the weekend, and for several days in the holidays. One recently left her job a Maths teacher to become an accountant, a job she says is far less stressful and pays the same.

It is the hours and the constant government interference. As an example 10 year olds will be sitting new tests this year. They are ludicrously difficult , test them on a curriculum they haven't been taught and example materials were only released last week by the department for education. As an example pupils can now only use exclamation marks if the sentence starts with "how" or "what" and also contains a verb. So for example "We all had a lovely day!" would be deemed to not show a pupil knew how to use an exclamation mark but "What a lovely day we all had!" would.

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Quite. I bet loads of them are "teaching English abroad as a foreign language". Basically an excuse to travel on the cheap for the workshy. ;)

I gotta admire their gall. Personally, id be too embarrassed to do any job in a foreign country without knowing the local language (unless it was some weird city state like Dubai, Singapore, HK) let alone a language specific job...a mate of my dad 'taught' english for a year or two in Italy after moving there with his italian GF. He spoke zero italian!

Not even sure how that is possible, but it seems quite common.

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Do teachers' children get born at school age? Who looks after them while they are young? If you think they don't work weekends and nights you don't know many teachers.

I am not a teacher

I guess you haven't heard of maternity leave then? Children can start nursery at 2.

I know lots of teachers, none of them work NIGHTS. Evenings aren't nights. They don't work weekends either.

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How do you define a crap teacher?

Give me a class at Eton and they'll get A*, give me a bottom set in Great Yarmouth and they'll all fail.

They are a bit like managers...mnost of the them are s**t but you get the odd good one.

Teachers should have to have 5 years work experience before even training.

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Teaching today is incomparable with what it was like 20 years ago.

Both my parents taught. They never worked for more than an hour after pupils had left school and my mum did an occasional half an hour on a Sunday night getting together materials for her class. It was a good job.

Now several of my friends and cousins teach. They work an extra couple of hours every day, at least one day at the weekend, and for several days in the holidays. One recently left her job a Maths teacher to become an accountant, a job she says is far less stressful and pays the same.

It is the hours and the constant government interference. As an example 10 year olds will be sitting new tests this year. They are ludicrously difficult , test them on a curriculum they haven't been taught and example materials were only released last week by the department for education. As an example pupils can now only use exclamation marks if the sentence starts with "how" or "what" and also contains a verb. So for example "We all had a lovely day!" would be deemed to not show a pupil knew how to use an exclamation mark but "What a lovely day we all had!" would.

Wow!
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They are a bit like managers...mnost of the them are s**t but you get the odd good one.

Teachers should have to have 5 years work experience before even training.

That reminds me of something my old man used to say:

"The problem with teachers is they've never left school"

Of course, the main issue with such an outlook is the misguided belief that teachers are there to teach life rather than syllabus. Teaching life would be far too damaging to the boys club.

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How do you define a crap teacher?

Give me a class at Eton and they'll get A*, give me a bottom set in Great Yarmouth and they'll all fail.

Couple of problems.

The state school system has been in place for a good 100 odd years.

You'll try and make a case that, after all that time and money, the state system is clueless on how to run itself.

Christ, private schools operate with much lower resources and people and manage a lot better, even accounting for pupil/parent slection.

Second problem, and this comes back (again) to that brainless scots goon.

If you double or triple the spend on education and/or the NHS then you have to justify where that spend is going FFS.

I had a chat to a teacher my partner works with, pointing out its all well and good the education budget going up but it had better deliver double the output/results or itll be fcked by the next government.

A very dim lightbulb went on.

The waste i.e. number of people not adding any value within state education is shocking.

90% of TAs is just mkaing up work for women who never passed any qualitivcations.

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My sister is training as a primary teacher at the moment, like everyone else I made the '13 weeks holiday, home by 3:30' jokes when she started but it really isn't like that.

She generally is doing the hours of 8 - 7 for the princely sum of 23k a year. She is also always doing work on Sundays.

One little example of the madness: When I was at school your work was marked either tick (right) or cross (wrong) but she has to mark each section with an additional 'What you did well' and 'what you could do better' which adds to the marking time, for no benefit (the kids don't read it or take notice).

Teachers themselves don't help with their endless waffle meetings.

If the government want to keep teachers in the profession they need to look at improving conditions for the existing teachers, rather than just and endless cycle of recruiting and turnover.

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There's no financial solution to this - pay rises / golden handcuffs etc won't make much of a difference. It's actually a reasonably paid career these days.

Teachers are leaving because it has become a horrible job, plain and simple. Too many hours (70+ is not uncommon once you add in the lesson preparation, marking, box-ticking spreadsheets), too much bureaucracy, very little autonomy, discipline problems.

In many ways it's similar to how junior doctors are treated. They're all starting to leave too.

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  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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