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Simon Taylor

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Staggering.

https://next.ft.com/content/b171b607-b65e-3377-b5f4-f3a50e75bca5

Here's a highlight:

Gross mortgage borrowing jumped 38 per cent year-on-year in January to £13.6bn, according to data from the BBA. That’s the highest since mid-2008.

Something happened in mid-2008, anyone remember?

Samuel Tombs at Pantheon Macroeconomics says:

Looking ahead, we expect approvals to remain on an upward trend. Consumer confidence is high, real income gains remain strong and mortgage rates are set to fall again in response to the decline in wholesale funding costs.

New buyer enquiries at estate agents have been rising quickly and point to mortgage approvals rising by a further 5% over the next three months. With the active supply of homes on the market close to record lows, house prices look set for very strong gains.

Perhaps we're the one marching out of step?

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Staggering.

https://next.ft.com/content/b171b607-b65e-3377-b5f4-f3a50e75bca5

Here's a highlight:

Gross mortgage borrowing jumped 38 per cent year-on-year in January to £13.6bn, according to data from the BBA. That’s the highest since mid-2008.

Something happened in mid-2008, anyone remember?

Samuel Tombs at Pantheon Macroeconomics says:

Looking ahead, we expect approvals to remain on an upward trend. Consumer confidence is high, real income gains remain strong and mortgage rates are set to fall again in response to the decline in wholesale funding costs.

New buyer enquiries at estate agents have been rising quickly and point to mortgage approvals rising by a further 5% over the next three months. With the active supply of homes on the market close to record lows, house prices look set for very strong gains.

Perhaps we're the one marching out of step?

It suggests it`s down to BTL jumping in before the SDLT rise.2008 could well be right

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HPC won't happen until the next credit crunch. Near or far, I have no idea.

Pay up, leave, or cheat.

I think you've got it spot on. It's hard to believe the money is there to keep blowing the bubble but it is... until it isn't because of a credit crunch

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HPC won't happen until the next credit crunch. Near or far, I have no idea.

Pay up, leave, or cheat.

There will be no credit crunch, the banks are funded by the QE magix printing press.

The banking system dies in 2007...something else will need to happen. A government collapse, or a monetary cpollapse, a dollar collapse, 2% IRs in the US, war, famine, small nucleur device in London.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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HPC won't happen until the next credit crunch. Near or far, I have no idea.

Pay up, leave, or cheat.

If this credit cycle is another 16 or so years (2 x biz cycles a la haldane) then far seems like a reasonable bet (with 1 recession betwixt)

With the active supply of homes on the market close to record lows, house prices look set for very strong gains.

Supply problem. Who knew.

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If this credit cycle is another 16 or so years (2 x biz cycles a la haldane) then far seems like a reasonable bet (with 1 recession betwixt)

Supply problem. Who knew.

Yes, there was absolutely no supply in Ireland and Spain as prices went to the stars......there is no glut of new build flats in London ( the one thing driving prices now ).

Stupidity problem more like.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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Supply problem. Who knew.

It's only a supply problem when you allow BTLers to leverage themselves tenfold buying up as much as they can with easy credit, whilst underpinning prices with taxpayer-backed schemes.

Edited by Eddie_George

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If this credit cycle is another 16 or so years (2 x biz cycles a la haldane) then far seems like a reasonable bet (with 1 recession betwixt)

Supply problem. Who knew.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/208547-house-price-rises-caused-by-lack-of-houses-utter-tosh/

We all knew it wasnt

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It's only a supply problem when you allow BTLers to leverage themselves tenfold buying up as much as they can with easy credit whilst underpinning prices with taxpayer-backed schemes.

:lol::lol::lol:

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If this credit cycle is another 16 or so years (2 x biz cycles a la haldane) then far seems like a reasonable bet (with 1 recession betwixt)

Supply problem. Who knew.

Yes, I read that line and considered quoting it but thought it might help things veer off-topic.

Looks like The Count took the bait...

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To make the same return today at ultra low interest rates.....lenders have to lend four times as much money.

House costing £100k......now therefore cost in excess of £400k..........wages are stagnant and not as secure with declining perks such as good final salary pensions, job security.....what we have is self employment, contract work, Zero or low hours guarantee contract like six hours a week......rolling contracts etc, etc.......a long-term debt means a long-term way of paying that debt.....when it rarely exists today.... ;)

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