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workingpoor

The Swimming Thread

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Thought i'd start a Swimming thread for tips & technique.

Any thoughts on this video for Freestyle the stepping and timing and recovery seem spot on

i would add turning the wrist out at the hip as it leaves the water :

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I used to swim a lot but it tailled off in the face of work and family commitments. I plan to get back into it this year.

I'm not a technical swimmer and never swim indoors - can't abide the hot chlorine atmosphere. But once the sea has warmed a bit I'll try and get in at least a couple of times a week. Need to be a bit careful as it's a remote spot and I'm on my own.

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Swimming is great, always enjoyed it.....the feeling after a good swim makes you feel light and warm, very good at burning energy without putting strain on the body.....the best form of all round exercise IMO.......that guy did not have goggles on, I find that some public pools are quite chlorinated so use if doing that stroke to help protect eyes.

Years ago as kids we spent most of the summer holidays down Finchley outside Lido, took a packed lunch and ate on the surrounding grass areas of the two large pools with fountains.....councils have got rid of most of them now....fewer kids can swim, there are also fewer places for them to swim.....cost cutting....and they call it progress, not.

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Used to go swimming each week a few years ago- but then they started doing private "gala parties" parties and closed it off to the public on the weekends. It was random when it happened and you'd have to check the website on the day to avoid disappointment. Initially we didn't check and had to go home once there, a few times - pretty disappointing.

Yeah I'm talking about you "Little down" and "The Quays"!

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Swimming is great, always enjoyed it.....the feeling after a good swim makes you feel light and warm, very good at burning energy without putting strain on the body.....the best form of all round exercise IMO.......that guy did not have goggles on, I find that some public pools are quite chlorinated so use if doing that stroke to help protect eyes.

Years ago as kids we spent most of the summer holidays down Finchley outside Lido, took a packed lunch and ate on the surrounding grass areas of the two large pools with fountains.....councils have got rid of most of them now....fewer kids can swim, there are also fewer places for them to swim.....cost cutting....and they call it progress, not.

indeed.

councils have done that a lot, like selling off school playing fields to property developers.

The 5- 10 years later they complain that kids are obese.

quite agree that it was kind of a national pastime with the outdoor pools.

in my younger days I would be swimming 3 or 4 times a week....twice for training and twice for leisure/diving

I could quite easily kill 2 hours a time in the pool.

I think they just need to get a bit more creative these days, and turn them into waterparks with cool slides etc.

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Guest eight

I'll freely admit that I can't swim. Excelled in pretty much all other sports but never really "got" swimming, I genuinely don't seem to be physically cut out for it - I can't even tread water by the book method without sinking. I have no desire at all to do anything about rectifying the situation. I'm in my forties now and still the need to be able to swim has never yet arisen in my life.

One thing that does trouble me is the amount of time dedicated to school swimming lessons. My daughter has swimming one afternoon per week, that 10% of the school curriculum gone on one marginally useful physical activity. And when you have learned to swim, which surely is the objective, they don't stop - it just goes on, endlessly. Also I always felt my inability to swim was looked down on far more harshly than other's failures in academic subjects, all of which I was very good at. Being crap at maths, for instance, appeared positively acceptable compared to being crap at swimming.

I also feel I'm less likely to drown than the statistical average, as I don't go into water. I would contend that the majority of people who die by accidental drowning do so precisely because they believe that they are better at swimming that they really are - not a mistake that I am likely to make.

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Guest eight

I would say join a club for beginners / intermediates and get someone else, who knows, to observe your technique and advise you.

Yeah, that's what I'd do - if I wanted, or felt I needed to, learn to swim.

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When my school had the swimming lesson, I had to stand traumatised at the side of the pool because they wouldn't let me in the water. I had warts on my knees. I didn't learn to swim until I was 30 when taking an evening class. I enjoy a calm warm sea abroad but not a fan of public swimming pools.

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The problem with lessons like hiring personal trainers etc is that they all want to milk you for repeat business and drag the lessons out.

I don't want to pay £40 to go up and down a pool for an hour using a float doing kick drills i could learn from Youtube.

I'm having fun learning myself and practising drills during lane swimming sessions.

A club is probably a better idea i see there is a Tri-Club at my local pool who have managed to get a slot on the timetable a couple of times a week but i suppose the swimming will be dedicated to front crawl only for competition purposes?

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Guest eight

I watched this last night. Shame we don't have this kind of thing in the UK.

On the extreme Eastern Algarve there is an abandoned water park that would be ideal for me. I can roll myself down a crumbling, bone dry, scorching hot slide before "splashing" into six inches of fine sand.

ETA: If it was in the UK I doubt the people would look anything like the ones in the video.

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On the extreme Eastern Algarve there is an abandoned water park that would be ideal for me. I can roll myself down a crumbling, bone dry, scorching hot slide before "splashing" into six inches of fine sand.

ETA: If it was in the UK I doubt the people would look anything like the ones in the video.

Yes, I just watched a few videos on youtube of US parks and most of the men and women were very fit looking. I suspect they are not the norm for US parks though as lots of Americans are obese. Judging by the 'behind the scenes' making of the video vidoes, which are numerous, you get the impression that alot of these videos are PR devices.

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I'll freely admit that I can't swim. Excelled in pretty much all other sports but never really "got" swimming, I genuinely don't seem to be physically cut out for it - I can't even tread water by the book method without sinking. I have no desire at all to do anything about rectifying the situation. I'm in my forties now and still the need to be able to swim has never yet arisen in my life.

One thing that does trouble me is the amount of time dedicated to school swimming lessons. My daughter has swimming one afternoon per week, that 10% of the school curriculum gone on one marginally useful physical activity. And when you have learned to swim, which surely is the objective, they don't stop - it just goes on, endlessly. Also I always felt my inability to swim was looked down on far more harshly than other's failures in academic subjects, all of which I was very good at. Being crap at maths, for instance, appeared positively acceptable compared to being crap at swimming.

I also feel I'm less likely to drown than the statistical average, as I don't go into water. I would contend that the majority of people who die by accidental drowning do so precisely because they believe that they are better at swimming that they really are - not a mistake that I am likely to make.

Actually I think treading water can be very hard unless you can already swim, not necessarily at all brilliantly, but just so that you feel confident out of your depth.

We were very lucky swimming wise when kids were small, living in the middle of the Abu Dhabi desert on a construction camp with nothing to do except the pool. They were both like little fishes by the time they were about two and a half, never really had to 'learn' at all, but they both began by swimming entirely under water, in a sort of tadpole wriggle. They still love the water. Mr B and I were always both happy in the water, which certainly helps.

Kids seem to learn earlier and earlier - I've heard of so many baby swimming sessions and my daughter has been taking hers since she was 6 weeks old. And quite apart from anything else, there's nothing like swimming IMO for tiring kids out!

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Working poor - it seems you are really concentrating on the details - which is necessary as swimming is all about that HOWEVER you really need to ensure the basics are right before even thinking about what finger exits where or similar things.

Head position, body alignment, balance in the water, swimming 'through a tube' etc..

These are all the base of agood stroke and you really should drill these fkwn before getting into the nitty gritty. Of course you may just be a natural and be sorted already - if so I am ******ing jealous !!

But odds are about 100-1 if not more.

That's why I asked about the strike count - will give a good idea if your basics are in shape or not.

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I'am a bit of a natural i'm confident in the water, i like to float around without moving and dump air to decend and lie on the bottom of the pool for a while seeing how long i can last lol

I have been working on balance and "pressing the T" the pivot point at the sternum to keep the legs up, no kick bouy for me!

I have been doing rotations side / 45deg / front / back lengths just kicking only arms against sides

(no float)

I get the swimming "through a tube" concept as well & sculling. Freestyle feels like pulling your way through a tube whilst surging forward down it? (rotating about 30deg on each foward surge)

I just have to go easy on my recovering broken fibula at the moment so just glad i can do some exercise, Thanks for giving me the idea of using the pool for rehab i've got right into it.

I can't try out tumble turns as i can't risk banging my leg on the wall but i can somersault underwater and i have snorkled a fair bit abroad.

The catch up drill has probably helped me the most on freestyle it brings in front quadrant swimming. Don't want to become an "overglider" though, lead hand should start the pull just before recovering hand enters.

I have used scuba gear as well years ago but only in a swimming pool.

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One thing that does trouble me is the amount of time dedicated to school swimming lessons.

Is your daughter in a particularly posh school? Or has it become the norm for schoolkids to have access to water they can swim in?

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Is your daughter in a particularly posh school? Or has it become the norm for schoolkids to have access to water they can swim in?

It's a requirement of the national curriculum, I think.

My younger son started swimming early, doing 25m lengths in fairly decent front, back and breast at around his 4th birthday. Now aged 6 he can knock out 50m in under a minute in all three. I think he'll be in the top 10 in Britain for breaststroke when he's old enough for an ASA ranking.

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Guest eight

Is your daughter in a particularly posh school? Or has it become the norm for schoolkids to have access to water they can swim in?

It's a regular state school. Personally I find the idea of compulsory swimming lessons to be the last remaining link to the more brutal elements of schooling that have been gradually ebbing away since the 1950's. What if you just don't like swimming, or being around water? I always found it baffling the amount of prominence it was given.

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It's just an example of how unfit for purpose the concept of school is. 1 hour a week is too much for someone with no interest or future in swimming. How many hours of compulsion do those with no interest, aptitude or future in, say, Maths, French, etc face?

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Guest eight

It's just an example of how unfit for purpose the concept of school is. 1 hour a week is too much for someone with no interest or future in swimming. How many hours of compulsion do those with no interest, aptitude or future in, say, Maths, French, etc face?

Well it's like saying, we've decided for arbitrary reasons of our own that the ability to speak Mandarin Chinese will be really important in your future. So we'll teach it for one afternoon a week, but you'll all be in your pants, we'll fill the air with noxious chemicals, and any momentary lapses of technique will be punished by a short period of suffocation.

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I think children ought to know abour water, even if an indoor bog is a dream!

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Swimming is a "Life Skill"

If i couldn't swim i would have to give water a wide berth, no cycling or jogging along canal towpaths, no fishing boat trips & keep well away from the hotel poolside on holidays etc

I would say lie on the back starshaped arch spine and press shoulderblades into the water would be the way to stay afloat & breathe easy if i fell into some water and couldn't swim.

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Guest eight

If i couldn't swim i would have to give water a wide berth, no cycling or jogging along canal towpaths, no fishing boat trips & keep well away from the hotel poolside on holidays etc

Careful not to walk along any normal footpaths, I wouldn't want you to fall into the road. Probably best to avoid railway platforms too, just to be on the safe side.

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