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Is It Against The Law For Landlords To Discriminate Against People With Kids?

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Has anyone else noticed these 'no children' notices on property websites?

One of the main reasons why so much of my hatred is directed toward the private rented sector is because of the blatant discrimination toward the I'll and disabled that seems so prevalent. It's very difficult however to prove such discrimination though when the advertisement just states 'no DSS'

However I didn't realise things had got so bad that they also discriminate against children. I'm struggling to understand how that could possibly be legal especially after the Equality Act became law in 2010.

Does anyone know of any case law in this area? I notice that someone on mumsnet set up a petition in 2010 that's now disappeared and I should probably post on mumsnet but it's just not really my scene lol as I'm not a mum and don't have any children.

Edited by spacedin

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Put it this way, if a council or housing association banned prospective tenants from having kids, there is no way they would get away with it.

Honestly when I saw those ads I literally gasped, I just can't believe how low the landlords have sunk. Scum of the bloody Earth some of them. I even read one story where someone was evicted after they had a kid but then that must be quite prevalent what with Section. 21 of the Housing Act. With my experience of the PRS and of landlords in general I guess I shouldn't be surprised.

Edited by spacedin

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No, it isn't.

As with many so called descrimination issues it depends how it is approached.

A landlord can't ban "disabled" people outright but could view a property as unsuitable for someone in a wheel chair (due to legitimate concenrs as to damage) or requiring say a wet room.

Unlike an employment situation there is a much more restricted requirment to make adjustments.

So, "No kids" is as legimimate as "No Smoking".

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Why should your kids be someone else's problem?

If the state wasn't blocking people from buying a bit of field to build their own house on, maybe you'd have a point.

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If the state wasn't blocking people from buying a bit of field to build their own house on, maybe you'd have a point.

"Build more crap as the solution to everything", sigh. Particularly when the problem is far more down to stupid lending (although irresponsible breeding adding to the population doesn't help, which makes it harder to be sympathetic to people with children).

I've not a lot of respect for landlords but on the other hand why shouldn't someone be able to choose who they do business with?

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I think it's pretty clear from the section in the Equality Act about age discrimination that this practice is indeed unlawful.

The only way to k ow for certain though is if someone tests it in court. Preferably a judicial review.

As fad as I can tell no-one has had a go. I'm sure lots of single mothers would be eligible for legal aid too. I think if I had kids I'd do it. ****** these people. I've had enough of all this ******** discrimination that pervades British society even in the face of legislation which at first glance seems to ban it.

In regards to disabled people, that hasn't been tested either as far as I'm aware.

Interesting article by the anarchist Johnny Void which comments on the legality of 'No DSS' notices.

https://johnnyvoid.wordpress.com/2012/04/26/are-landlords-breaking-the-law-when-they-demand-no-dss/

Edited by spacedin

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Has anyone else noticed these 'no children' notices on property websites?

It is a f*****g daft rule - especially when the property has 2+ bedrooms. :lol:

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Surprisingly enough someone I know with two children tells me a number of 3 bedroom houses he saw advertised when he was looking for somewhere to rent refused to allow tenants with children. A serious WTF moment.

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"Build more crap as the solution to everything", sigh. Particularly when the problem is far more down to stupid lending (although irresponsible breeding adding to the population doesn't help, which makes it harder to be sympathetic to people with children).

I've not a lot of respect for landlords but on the other hand why shouldn't someone be able to choose who they do business with?

Great, I'd like to do business with a farmer to buy a small plot of land, then I'd like to do business with a builder to stick a modest house on it. Why shouldn't I be able to choose who I do business with?

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Great, I'd like to do business with a farmer to buy a small plot of land, then I'd like to do business with a builder to stick a modest house on it. Why shouldn't I be able to choose who I do business with?

And if it's legal to build a house there (i.e. planning permission is granted) then you can. The law isn't saying who you can do business in that case, just what you can do.

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