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Kiwi Toast

What To Do About Incorrect Hr Records

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I've been told today by my manager that HR are disputing that I was promoted a couple of years ago. It was a minor promotion for a combination of passing some exams and having a bit of experience and satisfactory performance. I was given a pay rise (the amounts for passing the exams are set out clearly, but I got a little bit extra - I don't know if there is a set amount for this promotion or if it's discretionary, or if this was just the annual inflationary pay rise most people would get).

Luckily when I got home I found the letter confirming my promotion. Obviously I will bring in the letter to prove that I was promoted. But I wonder if I should ask my manager and/or HR to confirm the pay rise I would have been entitled to before revealing that I have the letter.

Does anyone have any advice?

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Eat a lot of "vegetariian curry", and dump on the photcopier/printer!

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Firstlt, I'd start looking for a new job with an employer who is a bit less shit.

Is your manager there same person it was when you were promoted? If so they should be able to sort this out without bothering you about it.

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I don't know for sure, but I imagine this says more about HR in general than my employer in particular.

My promotion was a couple of years ago. My manager at the time is now in another department. I've worked for others since who've now left the company and my current manager joined several months ago.

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That's basically what I'm asking if I should ask blobloblob. I said to my manager if I can't prove I was promoted might they give me a pay cut? He pointed out that it could be my pay wasn't increased as it should have been when I was promoted, so if I can prove I was promoted I should be in line with a pay rise. I'm wondering if it's good to get these things clarified first, as otherwise they just say: "Sorry. But by a happy coincidence your pay is correct [because we don't feel like giving you a pay rise]"

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Fair enough. Well, with a letter confirming it, you could hardly be considered a troublemaker. I'd definitely push it in your position. As you say, it's best to establish what the payrise should be before playing your full hand.

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It all sounds a bit disorganised. Are you saying you think there's a possibility they haven't been paying as much as they should have for the last few years? Surely you know what your salary should be and can see on your payslips what you've been paid? Where's the confusion?

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The amount on my payslip corresponds with the amount on my pay rise letter.

The confusion arises on the composition of the pay rises. I knew I was entitled to a pay rise of £1600 for passing exams. I actually received a rise of £2450. So, in addition to the pay rise due to exams, I got an £850 pay rise. Maybe this is the amount for going up to that grade. Maybe it was entirely discretionary. Maybe that was the inflationary amount that year. Maybe it doesn't really matter because it is never revealed.

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Tell them to ram it or you will take it to HR. That should stop them hassling you.

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I've been told today by my manager that HR are disputing that I was promoted a couple of years ago. It was a minor promotion for a combination of passing some exams and having a bit of experience and satisfactory performance. I was given a pay rise (the amounts for passing the exams are set out clearly, but I got a little bit extra - I don't know if there is a set amount for this promotion or if it's discretionary, or if this was just the annual inflationary pay rise most people would get).

Luckily when I got home I found the letter confirming my promotion. Obviously I will bring in the letter to prove that I was promoted. But I wonder if I should ask my manager and/or HR to confirm the pay rise I would have been entitled to before revealing that I have the letter.

Does anyone have any advice?

Yes make sure you keep hold of the letter, take a scanned copy if need be. The thing is you got an increase as you say for passing exams, no special there as it happens in lots of companies/organisations.

However if they have overpaid you the extra due to a clerical error then this is where the can of worms occurs, you may find if they are a decent company then they may write off what they have paid you and then reduce your pay accordingly. If they are absolute bar stewards then they may demand you pay back some or all of the amount, I've known one company (retail sector) hand it over to their debt recovery department and actually take employees to county court to recover the amount.

Why not pop on the ACAS group on LinkedIn and ask about your situation, your post will probably catch the eye of an employment lawyer

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If you've got the letter then in my view you've got the pay rise as they have effectively altered your employment contract to increase your salary. This is proven by "subsequent performance" as you've continued to work and they've paid you at the new rate.

I'd just give the a copy of the letter (but keep the original)

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