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Why are the following so f%#&!#g ubiquitous and universally adored..

Thomas the Tank Engine

Beatrix Potter

Mr Men

They're unreadable!

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My 2yr old was recently bought one of these for his birthday by his grandparents:

201345011_0_640x640.jpg?identifier=ffb7e

Well, he had 5 minutes of fun out of it I suppose :)

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Not everything universally adored by kids was bad... case in point:

And crayons, water balloons, ponies, lego, teddy bears, army men, space hoppers, etc...

Then there's paedo Rolf and rapist Cosby who have posthumously spoiled my (late) childhood.

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My 2yr old was recently bought one of these for his birthday by his grandparents:

201345011_0_640x640.jpg?identifier=ffb7e

Well, he had 5 minutes of fun out of it I suppose :)

I dimly remember having one of those when I was about that age (perhaps a bit older if I can remember it).

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I dimly remember having one of those when I was about that age (perhaps a bit older if I can remember it).

Me too. It lasted forever. This one is already broken.

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The original post lists inventive character books that have stood the test of time through generational sentimentality alone.

None of them would be particularly successful today in their current form.

Successful books today are much simpler stories and a pleasure (esp rhythmic) to read.

The Gruffalo will still be appealing in 30 years time, unlike the previously mentioned series.

(Thomas The Tank stories were multi-edged for me - as well as being badly written and structured stories, they were a confusing mouthful to read, and I could only hear Ringos awful, grating Scouse voice in my head)

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The original post lists inventive character books that have stood the test of time through generational sentimentality alone.

None of them would be particularly successful today in their current form.

Successful books today are much simpler stories and a pleasure (esp rhythmic) to read.

The Gruffalo will still be appealing in 30 years time, unlike the previously mentioned series.

(Thomas The Tank stories were multi-edged for me - as well as being badly written and structured stories, they were a confusing mouthful to read, and I could only hear Ringos awful, grating Scouse voice in my head)

I can't stand the repetition in the gruffalo and stick man but the snail and the whale is a pleasure.

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Why are the following so f%#&!#g ubiquitous and universally adored..

Thomas the Tank Engine

Beatrix Potter

Mr Men

They're unreadable!

Each to their own - I'd agree about TtTE (especially as I also suffer from hearing Ringo in my head)...

But Beatrix Potter has great language - they are great to read out loud...

and the Mr Mens are good for younger children. Of course the Adam Hargreaves books are crap, so avoid them.

And I'd agree about the Julia Donaldson books - lovely to read out

I can't stand the repetition in the gruffalo.

They're not for you - the repetition works with an infant.

I also love the language in Charlie and Lola - and Lauren Child's books for older children (Ruby Redfort) are really good as well.

...

but - what I really wanted to say was:

My 2yr old was recently bought one of these for his birthday by his grandparents:

201345011_0_640x640.jpg?identifier=ffb7e

Well, he had 5 minutes of fun out of it I suppose :)

I find some things amusing / strange - just what is a child meant to make of this? Nothing like it exists in their 'real world'. Same for curly-wire phones, big box televisions, etc.

I do find these generational changes interesting - for example, we all have the skill to change a lightbulb - make sure switch is off, take bulb out, if it's been on then use a cloth to stop you getting burnt, put new bulb in, if it turns on then rush back to turn off the switch because you forgot to do step 1 - but for my children LED bulbs might have a 20 year lifespan, and anyway, they don't get hot - so the whole skill of how to change a lightbulb will be alien to them...

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Each to their own - I'd agree about TtTE (especially as I also suffer from hearing Ringo in my head)...

But Beatrix Potter has great language - they are great to read out loud...

and the Mr Mens are good for younger children. Of course the Adam Hargreaves books are crap, so avoid them.

And I'd agree about the Julia Donaldson books - lovely to read out

They're not for you - the repetition works with an infant.

I also love the language in Charlie and Lola - and Lauren Child's books for older children (Ruby Redfort) are really good as well.

...

but - what I really wanted to say was:

I find some things amusing / strange - just what is a child meant to make of this? Nothing like it exists in their 'real world'. Same for curly-wire phones, big box televisions, etc.

I do find these generational changes interesting - for example, we all have the skill to change a lightbulb - make sure switch is off, take bulb out, if it's been on then use a cloth to stop you getting burnt, put new bulb in, if it turns on then rush back to turn off the switch because you forgot to do step 1 - but for my children LED bulbs might have a 20 year lifespan, and anyway, they don't get hot - so the whole skill of how to change a lightbulb will be alien to them...

Led bulbs don't get hot? Well maybe the glass doesn't but the base of them certainly does.

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Why are the following so f%#&!#g ubiquitous and universally adored..

Thomas the Tank Engine

Beatrix Potter

Mr Men

They're unreadable!

Are they ubiquitous.

I went through my childhood without reading any of them.

The kids comics of the 1960s and 1970s were wildly violent, anarchistic and un PC compared with anything children are presented with today. I mean FFS can you imagine our nanny society letting children getting their hand on something like the 'Slaves Of War Orphan Farm' which appeared in the the 1971 girls comic Tammy

http://marionette.org.uk/tammyproject/slaves-of-war-orphan-farm-2/

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Are they ubiquitous.

I went through my childhood without reading any of them.

The kids comics of the 1960s and 1970s were wildly violent, anarchistic and un PC compared with anything children are presented with today.

Hotspur was brilliant. Tales of wartime daring-do. I grew up in a house full of 60s and 70s annuals.

I'm not sure what kids stuff is over rated though, it's difficult to see it without an adults cynical view. Like action films that require a certain suspension of disbelief, kids can manage it in a way that adults can't.

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Hotspur was brilliant. Tales of wartime daring-do. I grew up in a house full of 60s and 70s annuals.

I'm not sure what kids stuff is over rated though, it's difficult to see it without an adults cynical view. Like action films that require a certain suspension of disbelief, kids can manage it in a way that adults can't.

Personally I think a lot of mainstream kids comics got anodyne in the 1980s. If you read some of the earlier stuff is got quite a tough view of the world. In fact one would imagine that children reading it were quite aware of the potential threats both physical and sexual that adults presented to them which rather gives the lie that they were all passive victims waiting to be exploited. One other thing I immediately notice from the comics of the 1960s and earlier is the important role of food as a reward. It is perhaps a hint of a population that at least carried the memories of shortages and rationing.

As for girls comics of the 1970s I imagine there is a whole psychological treatise that could be written about them.

http://marionette.org.uk/tammyproject/no-tears-for-molly-2/

Hard to believe this stuff with its violence and sado- masochistic sexual undertones was being published to 13 year olds by IPC the same company that produced the Daily Mirror

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Hmmm, I pretty much like all of the books mentioned; now and as a child.

Harry Potter was Greyfriars or (more my era) Jennings with some flying thrown in.

Most kids are a bit romantic about boarding school. The japes, the apple pie bed, the midnight feasts, the society of children.

As a day boy who did the prep with milk and biscuits but then got to go home I was close enough to see that it was fairly miserable, but I can suspend that memory when reading.

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I can't stand the repetition in the gruffalo and stick man but the snail and the whale is a pleasure.

A Squash and a Squeeze is my favourite followed by What the Ladybird Heard.

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Hmmm, I pretty much like all of the books mentioned; now and as a child.

Harry Potter was Greyfriars or (more my era) Jennings with some flying thrown in.

Most kids are a bit romantic about boarding school. The japes, the apple pie bed, the midnight feasts, the society of children.

As a day boy who did the prep with milk and biscuits but then got to go home I was close enough to see that it was fairly miserable, but I can suspend that memory when reading.

Agreed.

The concept of taking children out of the family situation and placing them in a boarding school where they can act as independent agents in control of their destiny is a story device as old as the hills. Rowling just gave it a new twist in Harry Potter and cleaned up financially. The appeal it has for children who never experienced that environment is strange since many British boarding schools appear to be a cross between educational institutions and prisons. Interestingly the threat of violence to children from an adult world and from their own contemporaries albeit wrapped up in magical hocus pocus is very much present in Rowlings works so they pick up on much older themes in children's literature.

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Hotshot Hamish was good.

I always liked Hugh Fowler The Man Who Hates Football from the same comic mainly for his maniacal grinning countenance and his commitment to the cause

http://www.branchofscience.com/2014/04/wednesday-comics-hugh-fowler-the-man-who-hates-football/

http://lewstringer.blogspot.co.uk/2015/11/ken-reids-hugh-fowler-scorcher-1971-to.html

Actually I think this is what some of the posters on the House Prices and the Economy threads of this forum look like.

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Roald Dahl was good too. Much darker than the more modern children's books.

Edit: I've just seen that Steven Spielberg is making a film adaptation of The BFG, which could be awful...

I saw a trailer for that at the Star Wars film. I'm hoping its going to be good, it was my favourite Roald Dahl book as a child I think I read it about a dozen times or so.

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I can't stand the repetition in the gruffalo and stick man but the snail and the whale is a pleasure.

+1. Epic in scale. My boy likes Monkey Puzzle too.

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